Welcome, Guest! - or
Easy to remember!  »  VinNews.com

Jerusalem - Daylight Saving Time Won’t Be Extended Until After Yom Kippur

Published on: March 27, 2012 10:01 PM
Change text size Text Size  
Bookmark and Share

Jerusalem - The Ministry of Interior announced on Sunday that summer time will once again end before Yom Kippur, on September 23, despite Interior Minister Eli Yishai’s decision last year to extend daylight savings time into October.

According to the ministry, the legislation has not yet been approved, which means that there will not be enough time to bring the bill into effect this year.

A Knesset committee comprised of government personnel, academics and industrialists, tasked with reviewing Israel’s relatively short period of DST, recommended last May that it should be increased from the current level of 185 days to 193 days.

Since 2005, DST has ended before Yom Kippur so that the fast finishes earlier in the day. DST will therefore end again this year on September 23, three days before the fast.

When the new legislation is finally passed, it will mean that, on average, 50 percent of the time Yom Kippur will fall before the switch and 50 percent of the time it will fall afterward.

Proponents of extending the summer time say that turning the clocks back at an earlier date leads to increased road accidents and saves the economy money due to energy savings on lighting. Most European countries begin DST on the last Friday in March, as in Israel, but end it on the last Sunday in October. The US summer time is even longer, beginning on the second Sunday in March and ending on the first Sunday of November.

Advertisement:

In addition to the government bill, several other private members bill have been proposed. MK Nitzan Horowitz (Meretz) has submitted a bill, supported by 20 MKs, that would extend summer time till the end of October, but it has been delayed several times in committee.

On Monday, Horowitz blasted Eli Yishai on his Facebook page for delaying his bill. “There is no limit to stupidity and indifference,” he wrote.

Two years ago, more than 300,000 people signed an online petition calling on the government to extend DST.

Content is provided courtesy of the Jerusalem Post


More of today's headlines

New York, NY - New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg says his successor shouldn't live in the mansion that has long been the official mayoral residence. The... Turkey - A Turkish TV advert for men's shampoo, featuring Adolf Hitler, has been withdrawn following complaints from the country's Jewish community. The 12-second...

 

You can now automatically hide comments - New!

Don't worry, you can always display comments when you need to.

Total10

Read Comments (10)  —  Post Yours »

1

 Mar 27, 2012 at 11:19 PM JackC Says:

The Fast is the same duration no matter what. If it ends earlier then it starts earlier. What nonsense!

2

 Mar 27, 2012 at 11:35 PM Anonymous Says:

Of all the absurd and simple-minded decisions imposed on residents of EY by a small cadre of rabbonim, this has to be somthing that would make even the Chief Rabbi of Chelm feel proud. The fast is 25 hours, whenever it starts and ends. Making it end earlier means that it starts earlier. What are Yishai' and his cronies using for sechel?

3

 Mar 28, 2012 at 12:15 AM baruchb Says:

Reply to #2  
Anonymous Says:

Of all the absurd and simple-minded decisions imposed on residents of EY by a small cadre of rabbonim, this has to be somthing that would make even the Chief Rabbi of Chelm feel proud. The fast is 25 hours, whenever it starts and ends. Making it end earlier means that it starts earlier. What are Yishai' and his cronies using for sechel?

Correct. Yet there is something psychologically satisfying when the fast ends earlier in the day. An extra hour at the beginning seems easier than an extra hour at the end. Of course, when all is said and done, it's all the same.

4

 Mar 28, 2012 at 02:22 AM Respect Says:

Reply to #2  
Anonymous Says:

Of all the absurd and simple-minded decisions imposed on residents of EY by a small cadre of rabbonim, this has to be somthing that would make even the Chief Rabbi of Chelm feel proud. The fast is 25 hours, whenever it starts and ends. Making it end earlier means that it starts earlier. What are Yishai' and his cronies using for sechel?

Believe it or not, somehow it works. I've been in EY for four Yom Kippurs so far and the fast did feel shorter. Keep in mind that davening typically starts earlier in the day than in the US, so there is no extra rush on the davening. But when it comes time to let it all go at Neilah, I feel like I have more energy. No doubt this is also kedushas ha'arets.

That said, there is also something to be said for an entire country who changes their clocks around the yomim tovim, closes public services (for the most part) on shabbos, and even secular society plans for and celebrates most yomim tovim in some fashion. In the US, most of my Jewish colleagues didn't even remember when or why regariding Purim, Shavuos and Succos.

6

 Mar 28, 2012 at 04:30 AM Reb Yid Says:

Reply to #3  
baruchb Says:

Correct. Yet there is something psychologically satisfying when the fast ends earlier in the day. An extra hour at the beginning seems easier than an extra hour at the end. Of course, when all is said and done, it's all the same.

But it doesn't end earlier in the day, it just ends earlier by the clock. If you use DST to start davening (and sleep) an hour later, you wouldn't notice any difference.

7

 Mar 28, 2012 at 06:25 AM TannaKamma Says:

Reply to #3  
baruchb Says:

Correct. Yet there is something psychologically satisfying when the fast ends earlier in the day. An extra hour at the beginning seems easier than an extra hour at the end. Of course, when all is said and done, it's all the same.

Even psychologically it's nonsense being that the zemanin for davening in the morning are earlier as a result so we have to wake up earlier...

8

 Mar 28, 2012 at 07:06 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #3  
baruchb Says:

Correct. Yet there is something psychologically satisfying when the fast ends earlier in the day. An extra hour at the beginning seems easier than an extra hour at the end. Of course, when all is said and done, it's all the same.

Well said,I agree!

9

 Mar 28, 2012 at 07:25 AM Normal Says:

Having the same argument for a couple of years now.

If Yom Kippur Shachris starts at the same time in daylight saving time as non-daylight saving then you will be awake (and fasting) for an extra hour before you can eat.

If Shachris is pushed 'later' one hour, (9am instead of 8am) then everything is identical as if it were not daylight saving.

For those worried about the time don't wear a watch and don't look at the clock.

10

 Mar 28, 2012 at 09:50 AM Queenbee Says:

I still agree with #3. It's psychologically easier for some when the fast ends earlier no matter when it started.

11

 Mar 28, 2012 at 10:00 AM Mima Says:

Reply to #9  
Normal Says:

Having the same argument for a couple of years now.

If Yom Kippur Shachris starts at the same time in daylight saving time as non-daylight saving then you will be awake (and fasting) for an extra hour before you can eat.

If Shachris is pushed 'later' one hour, (9am instead of 8am) then everything is identical as if it were not daylight saving.

For those worried about the time don't wear a watch and don't look at the clock.

There are mahn-de'amars who hold that a watch is muktzeh anyway (halachas of tiltul, kishut, etc).
Many don't wear watches on Shabbos (and, by extension, yom kippur - which has the same tiltul laws).
So if you're looking in your siddur, or yourself, or the heichal of the shul, or the aron kodesh - when will you see the time?
The clock would be on the side, the back, or up on the wall - don't let your eyes wander there on the holiest day, maybe it will prevent you looking at the ezras nashim too.

12

Sign-in to post a comment

Scroll Up
Advertisements:

Sell your scrap gold and broken jewelry and earn hard cash sell gold today!