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Manhattan, NY - New SoHo Restaurant To Serve Prepaid Shabbat Dinners and Nonmevushal Wines

Published on: May 13, 2012 11:02 PM
By: Full article at The Wall Street Journal
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Manhattan, NY - The plans for Jezebel look like many other SoHo restaurants aiming to draw a hip, downtown crowd.

The difference is in the details: A gold-plated shofar will serve as the door handle. Art work will include familiar pieces but with different faces (Woody Allen in a commissioned re-creation of “The Last Supper”). And an Orthodox Jewish overseer will keep a close eye on the kitchen at all times to make sure all’s kosher. Literally.

“We’re looking to change the norm of where the bar for kosher is,” said Menachem Senderowicz, 34 years old, one of Jezebel’s two owners. “We think we can take it up more than two notches and bring it to a whole new level.”

“We want to become the kings of kosher,” interjected co-owner Henry Stimler, 32.

Messrs. Stimler and Senderowicz plan to open Jezebel in June. It is the first restaurant for their group B&Y Hospitality (British and Yiddish, since Mr. Stimler is British and they both speak Yiddish), and they’ve hired James Beard Award-winning chef Bradford Thompson in the kitchen and Nick Mautone, formerly of Gramercy Tavern, to design the drink program.

The duo, who grew up Orthodox but now classify themselves as “modern Jews,” say the kosher aspect of the restaurant is almost an afterthought, albeit a carefully planned one that will include prepaid Shabbat dinners and unpasteurized kosher wine, which can only be handled by observant Jews.

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The owners say there is an unmet need for a cutting-edge restaurant for the Jewish demographic that is populating the likes of the nearby SoHo synagogue, but they insist they are not aiming for a predominately kosher or even Jewish clientele.

Jezebel plans to remain open on Friday night and has bought two special CVap ovens that are moisture-controlled and designed to hold products for a long period, Mr. Thompson said.

“We want it to be fresh, like you actually choose what you like that night,” he said. “We’re pushing it as far as we can and still staying within the guidelines.”

Also It is among the first kosher restaurant in the city—and possibly the U.S.—to serve unpasteurized, or nonmevushal wine, which must be handled at all times by a an observant Jew.

Most kosher certification agencies won’t permit this. But Rabbi Aaron Mehlman of the National Kosher Supervision agency on the Upper West Side is willing to give it a try.

“It’s an extra level of attention, and it’s very time consuming,” he said. “You have to have one or two people keeping track of these bottles. It’s also a pilot project. If it doesn’t work, I’m going to cancel it. We’re going to be very strict about it.”


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1

 May 13, 2012 at 11:12 PM Anonymous Says:

It's difficult but not impossible. I was mashgiach at a major affair and the State store - the only source of wine in the state - delivered non-mevushal wine. It was a Sunday and impossible to get new wine. We sent a mashgiach to stand and the bar and pour the wine (into new clean glasses only) and sent him around the tables to pour the wine. At the wedding, someone asked to see me. It was a local conservative rabbi and he was smiling. He said, "I've been a Rabbi for 30 years in this community and gone to many kosher affairs. When I saw an orthodox young man pouring the wine for everyone, I knew this was really kosher." Then he gave me a hug. It can be done but who's going to pour it on Shabbos or will they only sell it by the bottle?

2

 May 13, 2012 at 11:16 PM Anonymous Says:

It's a rather strange name for a kosher restaurant (or even for a hipster restaurant that happens to be kosher).

3

 May 13, 2012 at 11:16 PM Anonymous Says:

Doesn't it take away from the ambiance of a fancy restaurant to serve wine in disposable cups? Or will they kasher the glasses after non-frum use? Or just have two sets of glasses, kosher and traif?

4

 May 13, 2012 at 11:26 PM doc Says:

interesting to name it Jezebel.
She was a very wicked woman,and there is debate if she was even Jewish.

5

 May 13, 2012 at 11:26 PM mutti Says:

And what if other guests come in friday night? they wont be served?

6

 May 13, 2012 at 11:32 PM Anonymous Says:

Er - I don't think I'll be there. Good luck, gentlemen. I think you'll need it.

7

 May 13, 2012 at 11:41 PM Opening Says:

A little risqué but there obviously is a market for it

8

 May 14, 2012 at 12:13 AM Anonymous Says:

Why ? Why do we need all these places? Do we always have to push the limit in every possible circumstance ?
I think that rabbi mehlman should write a piece on why he is willing to always take on the risky side of Kashrus. Let's face it most people won't even inquire about anything one they hear it's kosher they eat it there regardless of who certifies
Is it so important for the rabbi to certify such an establishment ?
Is there not a little achrius

9

 May 14, 2012 at 12:14 AM Avrohomk Says:

From the way it is described, including the name, it sounds too much like "naval birshus HaTorah", it is a shame someone is willing to give a hashgacha

10

 May 14, 2012 at 12:52 AM concerned Says:

There are a few concenrs with serving non-mevushal wines 1) there can be no refills since if you refill it into a cup that has leftover stam yayin or if the goy is holding the cup while the mashgiach is refilling it - the remaining wine in the bottle become treif (nitzuk hachibutr)
2) all wine glasses will have to be washed seperately (in cold water) since you don't want to put any amount of treif wine (that is left in the glasses) in the dishwasher that will now be washed hot with all the other dishes of the day.
I hope Rabbi Melhman will at least hire an extra mashgiach to stand by the dishwasher so that no dirty glasses make it in.
3) When having a meal with either non-Jewish family members or business people it is inevitable for guests to move each others wine glasses or even take a sip and one is causing a yid to drink non-kosher wine.

If I were Rabbi Melhman I wouldn't be able to sleep well worrying about this.

11

 May 14, 2012 at 12:59 AM Materetsky Says:

Jezebel I think is seen as a hero in the feminist community (see: Liberal). There is a feminist magazine called Jezebel.

12

 May 14, 2012 at 01:04 AM Mark Levin Says:

Rabbi Mehlman is a trustworthy individual. If there are issues here, he WILL drop the hashgocha.

13

 May 14, 2012 at 02:30 AM brooklyn mom Says:

Trust me--with a name like Jezebel we will not partake in such a place--what's going to open across the street--Lot's Place? It might be technically kosher, but it certainly not within the spirit of the law. Remind me to check out Rabbi Mehlman's credential's and which other restaurants he gives a hashgacha on. Mir darfen tanzten nuch de goyim mit alless?

14

 May 14, 2012 at 03:17 AM proud-mo-israeli Says:

Reply to #3  
Anonymous Says:

Doesn't it take away from the ambiance of a fancy restaurant to serve wine in disposable cups? Or will they kasher the glasses after non-frum use? Or just have two sets of glasses, kosher and traif?

that is a disgusting & racist comment ... it's even a chumra on a disgraceful & racist halacha

15

 May 14, 2012 at 05:20 AM Respect Says:

This is clearly not for everyone, but if they can be matsliach without compromising hallacha kol hakavod. To anyone who would not eat there - please understand that this is an orthodox hashgacha and it is a personal decision as to whether or not to eat any individual hashgacha. This is between an individual and hashem (and hopefully his rav to discuss) but not something for the hamon am to comment on.

16

 May 14, 2012 at 07:46 AM Anonymous Says:

This kind of restaurant would do much better in Lakewood than in Soho. In Lakewood they are bored with the same old kosher pizza, burger and schwarma joints so a new cutting edge restaurant with innovative cuisine and top of the line chassideshe hasghacha would go over much better.

17

 May 14, 2012 at 06:50 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #15  
Respect Says:

This is clearly not for everyone, but if they can be matsliach without compromising hallacha kol hakavod. To anyone who would not eat there - please understand that this is an orthodox hashgacha and it is a personal decision as to whether or not to eat any individual hashgacha. This is between an individual and hashem (and hopefully his rav to discuss) but not something for the hamon am to comment on.

Really? That is ridiculous the "hamon am " is the most affected by this , the minute any sort of certification paper goes up in the window ,regardless of who it is the "hamon am" stats eating there. How can a person justify certifying this placeI .
"if I don't give a hecsher people will eat non- kosher et.." doesn't fly anymore , if they don't get a certification they will not make it by the frum yidden period.
If you read the rest of the article ,you will see the owners are quoted as specifically looking for a lenient hechsher.
There is so much to write on this topic , of how these places don't a hechser that it would take up pages . However you have to keep in mind one thing . The rabbi who certifies does it for money only thats it for money only.

18

 May 14, 2012 at 06:55 AM Anonymous Says:

To #12 No disrespect intended at all, but I never heard of Rabbi Mehlman. As I like to go out for dinner with family & friends, I'm always looking for new places to try. What can you tell me about him & his hashgacha?

19

 May 14, 2012 at 07:04 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #14  
proud-mo-israeli Says:

that is a disgusting & racist comment ... it's even a chumra on a disgraceful & racist halacha

"disgraceful & racist halacha"

Glad we heard that from you. Please let us know which other Halachos are "disgraceful & racist" so we don't have to keep them.

Who need Sages when we have you?

to #15:
This was put in the Wall Street Journal. It is for "hamon am" to comment on.

20

 May 14, 2012 at 08:18 AM Yeshivaboy Says:

This restaurant is obviously not targeted towards the ultra orthodox community, its trying to entice an oilum that run away from Kosher because its incomparable to high end places in the city. Just from the name, program, hechser and probably decor it simple to deduce that its clientele will mainly be Manhattan, read the article they want to attract that audience. I wouldn't worry about Lots place, I would worry why a mother is online at 2.30 AM, but I don't pass judgment so maybe you shouldn't to.

21

 May 14, 2012 at 08:49 AM It's gonna bring Moshiach for sure! Says:

I was going to comment on the rather inappropriate name, but, I see there are already many before me. Maybe it isn't so inappropriate after all - I don't think it is in the spirit of Shabbos to eat in a restaurant, maybe it's not wicked like Jezebel, but, it's not quite right. It most certainly would NOT belong in Lakewood as #16 said. There are already far too many restaurants there already and they don't need one that is open on Shabbos. (Yeah, maybe in Manhattan where all the modern singles are is the place to be)

22

 May 14, 2012 at 09:14 AM GG_Jew Says:

They are going for a Jewish crowd who dont really care about Kashrus too much, but will stop just short of eating 'proper' treif i.e. non-kosher meat and chicken. As long as it stays within the parameters of halacha its a good thing, although I certainly dont think anyone who is makpid on a decent level of kashrus should go anywhere near it. Anyway, good luck Ushi!

23

 May 14, 2012 at 09:14 AM ExpatriateOwl Says:

What's in a name?

If this Jezebel restaurant is a success, then maybe I shall open an establishment called "The Seething Kid."

24

 May 14, 2012 at 09:36 AM notsofrummie Says:

Reply to #17  
Anonymous Says:

Really? That is ridiculous the "hamon am " is the most affected by this , the minute any sort of certification paper goes up in the window ,regardless of who it is the "hamon am" stats eating there. How can a person justify certifying this placeI .
"if I don't give a hecsher people will eat non- kosher et.." doesn't fly anymore , if they don't get a certification they will not make it by the frum yidden period.
If you read the rest of the article ,you will see the owners are quoted as specifically looking for a lenient hechsher.
There is so much to write on this topic , of how these places don't a hechser that it would take up pages . However you have to keep in mind one thing . The rabbi who certifies does it for money only thats it for money only.

if you think these 'lenient' rabbi are only in it because of the money, why do you think the more reputable hashgachas are in in it for the goodness of their heart. Its all a business. There are many very kosher places that dont want to pay vaad or OU prices when they can get the same exact thing for half the price. I doubt there wont be much of a difference with a different rmashgiach

25

 May 14, 2012 at 09:36 AM Babishka Says:

Reply to #22  
GG_Jew Says:

They are going for a Jewish crowd who dont really care about Kashrus too much, but will stop just short of eating 'proper' treif i.e. non-kosher meat and chicken. As long as it stays within the parameters of halacha its a good thing, although I certainly dont think anyone who is makpid on a decent level of kashrus should go anywhere near it. Anyway, good luck Ushi!

My opinion, I think they want to appeal to out of town tourists and business travelers who keep Shabbos and kashrus but find it uncomfortable spending Shabbos with cold takeout food in a hotel room. I once spent Shabbos in L.A. at a hotel in the Pico Robertson neighborhood, it would have been really nice if one of those fancy restaurants had prepaid Shabbos meals. (Maybe they do now, I haven't been there for a few years)

26

 May 14, 2012 at 09:37 AM jonawolf Says:

Reply to #3  
Anonymous Says:

Doesn't it take away from the ambiance of a fancy restaurant to serve wine in disposable cups? Or will they kasher the glasses after non-frum use? Or just have two sets of glasses, kosher and traif?

I have lots of doubts about this restaurant's plans-- if they allow ANY walk-in Jewish customers and are owned entirely by Jews, it's hard to see how they can retain a proper hashgacha. And the non-mevushal wine is a perilous and complicated undertaking which is probably not worth the difficulties; there are numerous outstanding flash-heated fine wines. But the disturbing and filthy-minded commentators above should remember that prohibited wine is NOT "treif" (a convenient but misleading shorthand) in the sense that lard is, and does not contaminate everything around it in the same way. And as for some halachic opinions (not to mention the vulgar and behemahdic common parlance of many "observant" Jews), there is plenty of room for appropriate criticism, even condemnation ["lo maalin v'lo moridin"; the teshuvot which prohibit saving a non-Jew's life on Shabbat]. The grandeur of our tradition has NOT kept some authorities and some frum Jews from holding base attitudes toward fellow humans, non-Orthodox Jews, and women. Though there may have been a yerida b'kodesh/ hitkatnut hadorot in some senses, there has also (as Rav Kuk wrote) been an evolution of moral awareness. Thank G-d!

27

 May 14, 2012 at 09:37 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #16  
Anonymous Says:

This kind of restaurant would do much better in Lakewood than in Soho. In Lakewood they are bored with the same old kosher pizza, burger and schwarma joints so a new cutting edge restaurant with innovative cuisine and top of the line chassideshe hasghacha would go over much better.

Chassidishe hashgacha is not necessarily better! I can think of at least a few places that had Chassidishe Hashgacha and it was found to be treif or at least have problems.
Better to have a trustworthy one than a Chassidishe one.

28

 May 14, 2012 at 10:02 AM monseychick Says:

They should be matzliach. I give them credit for trying to open a kosher restaurant. Everyone is free to make their own choice about whether the kashrut meets their own standard.

30

 May 14, 2012 at 10:19 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #27  
Anonymous Says:

Chassidishe hashgacha is not necessarily better! I can think of at least a few places that had Chassidishe Hashgacha and it was found to be treif or at least have problems.
Better to have a trustworthy one than a Chassidishe one.

"Better to have a trustworthy one than a Chassidishe one...."

Agreed. But a trustworthy Chassideshe hashgacha is without a doubt the gold standard for mehadrim and will be relied upon by even the most machmir 'hipster' who tend to be very sophisticated and can check on line for instant updates about whats new in kashruth. The few cases where there were "problems" were really not true chassideshe hashgachos but simply had mashgichim who wore the lvush of a particular chassidus and it was guilt by association.

31

 May 14, 2012 at 10:26 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #14  
proud-mo-israeli Says:

that is a disgusting & racist comment ... it's even a chumra on a disgraceful & racist halacha

It's not racist - the halachah is that non-mevushal wine touched by a non-shomer shabbos Jew is not kosher, just like a non-Jew. Nothing to do with racism. (also, of course a frum ger no matter what race his wine is kosher, while the born "Jew" who is not frum it is not - nothing to do with race at all, only religion).

32

 May 14, 2012 at 10:27 AM Aloofknaz Says:

Rabbi Mehlman is the Hechsher on Dunkin Donuts, when Dale and Thomas Popcorn had a store in Times Square they were certified by his Hashgacha, that Icecream store on Avenue J was his hechser until he pulled it... Anyone know any oher?

33

 May 14, 2012 at 10:30 AM Secular Says:

Sounds chazir treif to me.

Jezebel? Really??

34

 May 14, 2012 at 11:02 AM Reb Yid Says:

R. Mehlman is well respected. All the major shuls in Manhattan have his restaurants on their "approved" list.

I'm sure he knows shulchan oruch at least as well as the commenters here. I would imagine he would not allow refills from a common bottle (not a problem if you buy the whole bottle--maybe they won't even sell by the glass). If a party has nochrim then that's an awkward situation to explain on the part of the Jewish members of the party, but isn't really the restaurant's obligation. And I assume that they'll rinse out the glasses before putting them in the dishwasher.

Bidieved nitzuk chibur doesn't apply to stam yeinom because it's really only a din by things that are issurei hano'oh. And the dishwasher problem is also not bidieved because the detergent is davar hapogem.

35

 May 14, 2012 at 11:03 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #26  
jonawolf Says:

I have lots of doubts about this restaurant's plans-- if they allow ANY walk-in Jewish customers and are owned entirely by Jews, it's hard to see how they can retain a proper hashgacha. And the non-mevushal wine is a perilous and complicated undertaking which is probably not worth the difficulties; there are numerous outstanding flash-heated fine wines. But the disturbing and filthy-minded commentators above should remember that prohibited wine is NOT "treif" (a convenient but misleading shorthand) in the sense that lard is, and does not contaminate everything around it in the same way. And as for some halachic opinions (not to mention the vulgar and behemahdic common parlance of many "observant" Jews), there is plenty of room for appropriate criticism, even condemnation ["lo maalin v'lo moridin"; the teshuvot which prohibit saving a non-Jew's life on Shabbat]. The grandeur of our tradition has NOT kept some authorities and some frum Jews from holding base attitudes toward fellow humans, non-Orthodox Jews, and women. Though there may have been a yerida b'kodesh/ hitkatnut hadorot in some senses, there has also (as Rav Kuk wrote) been an evolution of moral awareness. Thank G-d!

Yayin Nesech is assur b'mashehu.

36

 May 14, 2012 at 11:11 AM concerned_Jew Says:

Here is a pair of entreprenuers who want to make some honest money pleasing as many people as they can and everyone has to chime in with etzas and comments? When are you all opening up a kosher resturant? I'll be never. Yet you have no problem giving your highfelutin opinon on everything under the sun!
And if you don't know what highfelutin means then look it up in the dictionary!

37

 May 14, 2012 at 11:37 AM RebBaltimore Says:

Reply to #12  
Mark Levin Says:

Rabbi Mehlman is a trustworthy individual. If there are issues here, he WILL drop the hashgocha.

Proper supervision there on Shabbos is nigh impossible.
The owners repudiate the label Orthodox, i.e. Halachic, Jews.
They name the place after an evil person.
2+2=you do the math

38

 May 14, 2012 at 12:36 PM clear-thinker Says:

Reply to #37  
RebBaltimore Says:

Proper supervision there on Shabbos is nigh impossible.
The owners repudiate the label Orthodox, i.e. Halachic, Jews.
They name the place after an evil person.
2+2=you do the math

I am not in love with the name. However, there can be no proper supervision? Today there are hotels and restaurants (under good haskacha) which have been able to stay open on Shabbat. You certainly don't have to eat in any restaurant you have a problem with, but who appointed you chief halachic Jew of New York. Don't you have enough issues in Baltimore to keep you busy?

39

 May 14, 2012 at 12:58 PM BeKind Says:

Where is SoHo? What are the nearest crossroads?

40

 May 14, 2012 at 01:08 PM ShmuelG Says:

Reply to #31  
Anonymous Says:

It's not racist - the halachah is that non-mevushal wine touched by a non-shomer shabbos Jew is not kosher, just like a non-Jew. Nothing to do with racism. (also, of course a frum ger no matter what race his wine is kosher, while the born "Jew" who is not frum it is not - nothing to do with race at all, only religion).

You are trying to deprive a liberal of his best argument. You may have noticed: There is a finite number of talking points that a liberal is capable of memorizing.

("Racist," "hater," "homophobe," " Bush lied," "hopenchange" and perhaps few others for exceptionally talented liberals. "Halliburton" used to belong to this list, but then they had to make room for "hopenchange" so they let go of "Halliburton" and almost never bring it up anymore.)

And so the liberals try to apply their limited subset of arguments to every situation. (You may remember how Nancy Pelosi justified her approval of the war on Iraq because Saddam was bad for the "environment.") It never works but none of them would know the difference.

41

 May 14, 2012 at 01:16 PM Dave Says:

Reply to #30  
Anonymous Says:

"Better to have a trustworthy one than a Chassidishe one...."

Agreed. But a trustworthy Chassideshe hashgacha is without a doubt the gold standard for mehadrim and will be relied upon by even the most machmir 'hipster' who tend to be very sophisticated and can check on line for instant updates about whats new in kashruth. The few cases where there were "problems" were really not true chassideshe hashgachos but simply had mashgichim who wore the lvush of a particular chassidus and it was guilt by association.

Are you out of your mind?
Chasidishe hecsherim do not update anything .
They will never tell you if they found problems In a restaurant
In a million years if the problem is ever caught. We need erliche English reading mashgichim

42

 May 14, 2012 at 01:18 PM Dave Says:

Reply to #36  
concerned_Jew Says:

Here is a pair of entreprenuers who want to make some honest money pleasing as many people as they can and everyone has to chime in with etzas and comments? When are you all opening up a kosher resturant? I'll be never. Yet you have no problem giving your highfelutin opinon on everything under the sun!
And if you don't know what highfelutin means then look it up in the dictionary!

Did you not just give your opinion?

43

 May 14, 2012 at 04:08 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #41  
Dave Says:

Are you out of your mind?
Chasidishe hecsherim do not update anything .
They will never tell you if they found problems In a restaurant
In a million years if the problem is ever caught. We need erliche English reading mashgichim

You need to be careful about disparaging any Chassideshe hashgacha. These are all big tzadikim and yirai shamayim and do this work le'shem mitzvah. Any shortcomings in their English language skills are more than compensated for by their unique expertise in matters of hashgacha that will be critical to meeting the discerning standards of this restaurant's upscale customer base of ehrliche yidden who want only the best.

44

 May 14, 2012 at 04:16 PM ShmuelG Says:

Reply to #36  
concerned_Jew Says:

Here is a pair of entreprenuers who want to make some honest money pleasing as many people as they can and everyone has to chime in with etzas and comments? When are you all opening up a kosher resturant? I'll be never. Yet you have no problem giving your highfelutin opinon on everything under the sun!
And if you don't know what highfelutin means then look it up in the dictionary!

Didn't need to look it up in the dictionary to know it's spelled highfalutin. But it's fine. You learned a new word and attempted to use it in proper context. I'll give you C for effort.

45

 May 14, 2012 at 03:33 PM Yeshivaboy Says:

Reply to #39  
BeKind Says:

Where is SoHo? What are the nearest crossroads?

323 West Broadway between Canal and Grand, I drove past today and peeked in, looks mamash amazing.

46

 May 14, 2012 at 03:47 PM anonymously Says:

Reply to #39  
BeKind Says:

Where is SoHo? What are the nearest crossroads?

I am very excited for this establishment and think its needed

47

 May 14, 2012 at 07:36 PM BeKind Says:

Reply to #45  
Yeshivaboy Says:

323 West Broadway between Canal and Grand, I drove past today and peeked in, looks mamash amazing.

Thank you.

48

 May 14, 2012 at 06:43 PM Anonymous Says:

There is nothing like this in either Monsey or Lakewood so they are likely to get a lot of business from visitors to New York from out of town. Its only a short trip to SoHo from either willy or BP.

49

 May 14, 2012 at 06:43 PM really high Says:

Reply to #43  
Anonymous Says:

You need to be careful about disparaging any Chassideshe hashgacha. These are all big tzadikim and yirai shamayim and do this work le'shem mitzvah. Any shortcomings in their English language skills are more than compensated for by their unique expertise in matters of hashgacha that will be critical to meeting the discerning standards of this restaurant's upscale customer base of ehrliche yidden who want only the best.

I wanna know what you're smokin'. Chassidishe hashgachas are no better than anyone else's--the real important thing is how erlich is the mashgiach himself. Since many places that called themselves kosher and claimed they had chassidishe schechita or used chassidishe meat were caught actually selling treif. Remember the supermarket in Monsey not so many years ago--just one example

50

 May 14, 2012 at 09:06 PM Knowledgable Says:

I know the owners - both very fine individuals from good homes. Just trying to make a dent in the kosher market. Not looking for those who criticize & judge to be their clientele. I know Rabbi Mehlman - an ehrlich & heimish Rabbi who doesn't give Hashgacha where this is Safek.

Bottom line - you don't want to eat there, don't. But, don't condemn.

51

 May 15, 2012 at 12:01 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #49  
really high Says:

I wanna know what you're smokin'. Chassidishe hashgachas are no better than anyone else's--the real important thing is how erlich is the mashgiach himself. Since many places that called themselves kosher and claimed they had chassidishe schechita or used chassidishe meat were caught actually selling treif. Remember the supermarket in Monsey not so many years ago--just one example

Of course it depends on the individual mashgiach but a chassideshe mashgiach is more likely to be ehrlich. Just one person's view but based on experience most heimeshe yidden will trust a chassideshe hashgacha (at least outside of Lakewood).

52

 May 15, 2012 at 03:51 AM The-Macher Says:

No one is forcing anyone to go there. Ask your rov if you're not sure.

53

 May 15, 2012 at 08:07 AM Bat Sheva Says:

The restaurant does not have to be glatt or hold by every chumra going to get a hechsher. Better that some Jews at least eat kosher, even at a more basic level, than feel the need to eat treif and pay for it on Shabbos. Strange though it may seem to most of the readers here, there are lots of Yidden about who do not look for glatt standards, who are not members of the "Chumra a day Club" and really don't have any idea what chassidishe shechita is or what makes a chassidishe mashgiach "more likely to be ehrlich".

54

 May 17, 2012 at 04:44 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #10  
concerned Says:

There are a few concenrs with serving non-mevushal wines 1) there can be no refills since if you refill it into a cup that has leftover stam yayin or if the goy is holding the cup while the mashgiach is refilling it - the remaining wine in the bottle become treif (nitzuk hachibutr)
2) all wine glasses will have to be washed seperately (in cold water) since you don't want to put any amount of treif wine (that is left in the glasses) in the dishwasher that will now be washed hot with all the other dishes of the day.
I hope Rabbi Melhman will at least hire an extra mashgiach to stand by the dishwasher so that no dirty glasses make it in.
3) When having a meal with either non-Jewish family members or business people it is inevitable for guests to move each others wine glasses or even take a sip and one is causing a yid to drink non-kosher wine.

If I were Rabbi Melhman I wouldn't be able to sleep well worrying about this.

Well, you're not him, so no problem.

Also, you are not the mashgiach for this restaurant, and you are not a posek, so why is it your business what and how they are doing?

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 Jul 27, 2012 at 01:26 PM reneeS Says:

I wish them success with their new venture. It is always difficult to start a new business. It is refreshing and good that one can eat outside one's usual setting a delicious and kosher meal. I

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