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Augusta, GA - South Carolina Woman Ranked As Oldest American Dies At Age 114

Published on: January 5, 2013 07:29 PM
By: Reuters
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Mamie Rearden was born in South Carolina on September 7, 1898.Mamie Rearden was born in South Carolina on September 7, 1898.

Augusta, GA - A 114-year-old South Carolina woman who was born when William McKinley was president of the United States and had ranked as the oldest known living American for just over two weeks, has died, her daughter said on Saturday.

Mamie Rearden died on Wednesday at a hospital in Augusta, Georgia, about 20 miles south of her South Carolina home, her youngest daughter, Sara Rearden, told Reuters.

She had recently broken her hip and was having difficulty breathing earlier in the week, her daughter said, adding, “I was looking right at her when she took her last breath.”

Even at Rearden’s advanced age, she was younger than the oldest known living person in the world, identified as a 115-year-old Japanese man, Jiroemon Kimura, according to the Gerontology Research Group.

The group’s figures show Rearden became the oldest living person in the United States just 16 days before her death.

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Rearden was born on September 7, 1897, in Edgefield, South Carolina, where she was raised and lived all her life, her daughter said. She was a school teacher early in life, but after getting married and starting a family she left the job to become a homemaker, and went on to have 11 children in all.

She obtained her first driver’s license at age 65, and at about the same time became a case worker for an anti-poverty program, according to her daughter. Her husband, Oacy Rearden, died in 1979 at the age of 88.

Rearden lived by her Baptist faith, her daughter said.

“She was the type who would say, ‘Do unto others as you want them to do by you,’ and later she changed that, which is interesting, to ‘do unto others as they ought to do by you,’” Sara Rearden said.

Rearden became the oldest known living person in the United States after the December 17 death of 115-year-old Dina Manfredini in Iowa. At the time of her death, Manfredini also ranked as the world’s oldest person, according to Guinness World Records.


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1

 Jan 05, 2013 at 08:51 PM yaakov doe Says:

Seems common that the oldest living American rarely holds the title for any length of time.

2

 Jan 05, 2013 at 09:22 PM momof8 Says:

Reply to #1  
yaakov doe Says:

Seems common that the oldest living American rarely holds the title for any length of time.

Maybe that's because they are usually really, really, really old.

3

 Jan 05, 2013 at 11:42 PM TexasJew Says:

#1 Can't wait to be on the list even if it's only for an hour.

4

 Jan 06, 2013 at 06:33 AM civil rights Says:

when she was born was still slavery, i guess she was from last slaves left...

5

 Jan 06, 2013 at 08:26 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #4  
civil rights Says:

when she was born was still slavery, i guess she was from last slaves left...

No, she was born in 1897. Slavery ended in 1865 (end of Civil War).

6

 Jan 06, 2013 at 09:02 AM qazxc Says:

But when did yeahivos stop teaching basic American history?

7

 Jan 06, 2013 at 02:59 PM ShmuelG Says:

Reply to #4  
civil rights Says:

when she was born was still slavery, i guess she was from last slaves left...

Went to public school, didn't you? Slavery was abolished about 45 years before she was born.

8

 Jan 07, 2013 at 08:24 AM Materetsky Says:

Reply to #7  
ShmuelG Says:

Went to public school, didn't you? Slavery was abolished about 45 years before she was born.

In 1852?
Before yo make fun of someone else before getting the facts wrong, make sure you have them right yourself. The Emancipation Procolomation was in 1863 and didn't immediately free everyone.

9

 Jan 07, 2013 at 04:51 PM ShmuelG Says:

Reply to #8  
Materetsky Says:

In 1852?
Before yo make fun of someone else before getting the facts wrong, make sure you have them right yourself. The Emancipation Procolomation was in 1863 and didn't immediately free everyone.

Yep. A miscalculation on my part, I stand corrected: according to Civil Rights #4, she was a slave for the first -34 years of her life, not the first -44 years. Huge difference.

10

 Jan 08, 2013 at 11:35 AM Materetsky Says:

Reply to #9  
ShmuelG Says:

Yep. A miscalculation on my part, I stand corrected: according to Civil Rights #4, she was a slave for the first -34 years of her life, not the first -44 years. Huge difference.

Obviously not a huge difference, but when you take it upon yourself to correct someone's historical inaccuracies, you look a little silly when you are wrong as well. Especially when you say something like "Went to public school, did you?" ... as though to personally insult the person. It's not necessary in a forum like this.

I went to public school-- not by choice-- and had to memorize the entire Gettysburg Address before bas mitzvah.

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