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New York - United Airlines Finds Wiring Problem On 787

Published on: January 9, 2013 08:29 AM
By: Reuters
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An undated handout photo of a United Airlines 787 Dreamliner supplied by United Airlines December 5, 2012. REUTERS/Gail Hanus/United AirlinesAn undated handout photo of a United Airlines 787 Dreamliner supplied by United Airlines December 5, 2012. REUTERS/Gail Hanus/United Airlines

New York - United Airlines (UAL.N) has found a wiring problem on one of its Boeing Co (BA.N) 787 jets, an issue that affects the same system that caused a fire aboard a Japan Airlines Co 787 in Boston on Monday, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing a source.

The airline found improperly installed wiring in electrical components associated with the auxilliary power unit, the Journal reported. United examined the components after the fire on Monday, which took the Japan Airlines jet out of service.

United spokeswoman Christen David said United inspected its 787s after the Boston incident, but she declined to confirm the Journal report or to discuss the results of the inspections.

 

 


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1

 Jan 09, 2013 at 09:06 AM good news Says:

Finding a problem in wiring implies that it was installed wrong and can be fixed. This would be good because this plane is pretty close to be grounded, just like the DC-10 was many years ago.
Historically, the DC-10 continued in production as versions of the DC-10 and MD-11 while its most direct competitor the L-1011 was a financial flop but a pretty good plane.

2

 Jan 09, 2013 at 11:06 AM Anonymous Says:

The DC-10 was never grounded, although there were calls to do so. The power of the airline lobby, consisting of aircraft manufacturers, and their henchmen prevented the DC-10 from being grounded.

3

 Jan 09, 2013 at 02:56 PM DC-10 was grounded Says:

Reply to #2  
Anonymous Says:

The DC-10 was never grounded, although there were calls to do so. The power of the airline lobby, consisting of aircraft manufacturers, and their henchmen prevented the DC-10 from being grounded.

I traveled international that summer after a milestone graduation. Booking flights was horrendous because many planes were grounded. Please read below
The Chicago accident also highlighted a major deficiency in the DC-10 design; its lack of a locking mechanism to maintain the position of the leading-edge slats in the event of a hydraulic or pneumatic failure.[65] Other wide-body aircraft of the day carried such a feature. Another deficiency highlighted in the NTSB report was the vulnerable placement of wiring at the leading-edge (front) of the wing.[citation needed] When the engine pulled up and over the wing, it tore out these lines, thus rendering vital warning instruments in the cockpit inoperable. Following the Chicago crash, the type certificate of the DC-10 wasWITHDRAWN by the FAA, GROUNDING the aircraft on June 6, 1979. The aircraft resumed service after modifications were made to the slat actuation and position systems, along with stall warning and power supply changes.

4

 Jan 09, 2013 at 05:12 PM Ex-Cessna Pilot Says:

To #3 (DC-10 was grounded)- It was not the design flaw of the DC-10, which caused the worst single aviation accident in American history, at O'Hare Airport, in May, 1979. It was the negligent and defective manner, in which the airline mechanics rendered repairs to the engines, causing the engine to fall off, and causing debris from the falling engine, to damage other systems of the aircraft. Numerous recommendations were made by the NTSB, and unfortunately, not all of them were followed. One of the recommendations called for the redesign of the hydraulic systems, on the DC-10. The latter recommendation was never ordered by the FAA. As a result, another disastrous accident involving the DC-10 at the Sioux City Airport, in July, 1989, took place.

5

 Jan 09, 2013 at 06:24 PM cbdds Says:

Reply to #4  
Ex-Cessna Pilot Says:

To #3 (DC-10 was grounded)- It was not the design flaw of the DC-10, which caused the worst single aviation accident in American history, at O'Hare Airport, in May, 1979. It was the negligent and defective manner, in which the airline mechanics rendered repairs to the engines, causing the engine to fall off, and causing debris from the falling engine, to damage other systems of the aircraft. Numerous recommendations were made by the NTSB, and unfortunately, not all of them were followed. One of the recommendations called for the redesign of the hydraulic systems, on the DC-10. The latter recommendation was never ordered by the FAA. As a result, another disastrous accident involving the DC-10 at the Sioux City Airport, in July, 1989, took place.

To #4,
All that you state is indeed true, I follow stories like this and I read. The error was caused by removing and installing the engine and pylon as one piece which they thought was OK but was not.
The other accident was caused by depressurization after an unsealed cargo door fell off even though sensors showed it as closed. This caused the passenger floor to buckle outward and damaaged all the hydraulics that ran right below the floor. I am guessing that the sensors not being able to sense an unlocked cargo door might be a design flaw.

6

 Jan 10, 2013 at 08:47 AM Aviation Historian Says:

To CBDDS-#5- The July, 1989 accident, at the Sioux City, Iowa airport, involving a DC-10, was not caused by an unsealed cargo door, damaging the hydraulics. You must be thinking of another accident, which encompassed that scenario. The Sioux City accident was caused by one of the engines exploding, causing debris to destroy all of the hydraulic systems. It was determined by the NTSB that the engine was not properly inspected. Capt. Al Haynes, pilot of the DC-10, managed to make it to the Sioux City airport, but at the last few seconds, he lost control, and the plane split into several parts. There were nearly 200 survivors, but unfortunately, over 100 passengers died. One of the passengers who safely escaped, heard the cries of a baby coming from the plane. He managed to go through the burning aircraft, and save the life of a 10 month old baby girl, who fortunately, had only a few scratches. When the hero met with Capt. Haynes at a survivor's reunion, Haynes wanted to know how he did it.

7

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