Welcome, Guest! - or
Easy to remember!  »  VinNews.com

Dallas, TX - Southwest: Flyers Can Pay $40 To Board First

Published on: January 21, 2013 08:09 PM
By: AP
Change text size Text Size  
Bookmark and Share

Dallas, TX - Want to board first on a Southwest Airlines flight? Now you can pay $40 for the privilege.

Advertisement:

Southwest Airlines will let people pay to be part of their first boarding group, group “A.” The airline does not have assigned seating and lets passengers board in three groups, A, B and C.

Currently, passengers can ensure they board first by buying a special business class ticket or joining a loyalty program. Now, everyone will have that option if spots are available. Passengers will be able to pay at the gate starting 45 minutes before a flight leaves.

Facing higher fuel and other costs, airlines have sought to boost revenue in a variety of ways including charging extra to check a bag or sit next to a loved one.


More of today's headlines

Jerusalem - With the imminent opening of election booths, the Shas Party’s political and spiritual leadership issued their final campaign messages on Monday, along... Washington - There was preaching, praying and singing at President Barack Obama's church service on Inauguration Day on Monday. But was there tweeting, too? As...

 

You can now automatically hide comments - New!

Don't worry, you can always display comments when you need to.

Total16

Read Comments (16)  —  Post Yours »

1

 Jan 21, 2013 at 08:42 PM Aron1 Says:

I might consider paying $40 extra to get OFF the plane first (& extra $10 if I can stand up before the FASTEN SEATBELT sign goes off).

2

 Jan 21, 2013 at 10:44 PM shmaltz222 Says:

why would anyone fly southwest

when JetBlue goes most places...no drama, great seats, great on board TV, pay for more legroom if you like that thing...I mean why fly an airline that shows how bad their customer service is (they had a reality show) and is proud of that

3

 Jan 21, 2013 at 11:20 PM CHANA1 Says:

I'd rather board last-who wants to sit on a plane one extra minute?

4

 Jan 21, 2013 at 11:43 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #2  
shmaltz222 Says:

why would anyone fly southwest

when JetBlue goes most places...no drama, great seats, great on board TV, pay for more legroom if you like that thing...I mean why fly an airline that shows how bad their customer service is (they had a reality show) and is proud of that

Southwest is awesome. I love that I can change my ticket without a change fee and keep the credit. They're almost always on time and super friendly. And two bags free, can't beat that.

5

 Jan 22, 2013 at 12:04 AM Frequent traveler Says:

Reply to #2  
shmaltz222 Says:

why would anyone fly southwest

when JetBlue goes most places...no drama, great seats, great on board TV, pay for more legroom if you like that thing...I mean why fly an airline that shows how bad their customer service is (they had a reality show) and is proud of that

why? because they are awesome! there is a sense of humor on board and not a bunch of stiff people. Given the choice I would fly WN a lot more!

6

 Jan 22, 2013 at 12:48 AM airtravelar Says:

Reply to #2  
shmaltz222 Says:

why would anyone fly southwest

when JetBlue goes most places...no drama, great seats, great on board TV, pay for more legroom if you like that thing...I mean why fly an airline that shows how bad their customer service is (they had a reality show) and is proud of that

Well 90% of the destinations South west fly's Jet blue doesn't,

7

 Jan 22, 2013 at 12:49 AM travel agent Says:

Reply to #3  
CHANA1 Says:

I'd rather board last-who wants to sit on a plane one extra minute?

Your so right, but on domestic flights the overhead bins full up very fast. then they start taking it away.

8

 Jan 22, 2013 at 12:50 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #4  
Anonymous Says:

Southwest is awesome. I love that I can change my ticket without a change fee and keep the credit. They're almost always on time and super friendly. And two bags free, can't beat that.

Hey you go!!! but they have a very bad record of delays

9

 Jan 22, 2013 at 07:27 AM Ex-Jet Blue flyer Says:

One time, we were coming into JFK Airport on Jet Blue. The inexperienced pilot went too close to the wake turbulence of another jet plane in front of us. As a result, our plane went into a very dangerous tilt to the right. The right wing dipped very rapidly, no less than 40 degres. it felt as it we were going to crash, since we were less than 1,500 feet above the ground.The pilot came on the intercom, and tried to minimize his error. However, it is the pilot's responsibility to stay well enough away from another aircraft, to prevent aircrafts resulting from wake turbulence.

10

 Jan 22, 2013 at 08:03 AM Leon Zacharowicz Says:

I wonder if those paying this fee will get preference over handicapped individuals and families with little children.

11

 Jan 22, 2013 at 09:02 AM too close, blame ATC Says:

Reply to #9  
Ex-Jet Blue flyer Says:

One time, we were coming into JFK Airport on Jet Blue. The inexperienced pilot went too close to the wake turbulence of another jet plane in front of us. As a result, our plane went into a very dangerous tilt to the right. The right wing dipped very rapidly, no less than 40 degres. it felt as it we were going to crash, since we were less than 1,500 feet above the ground.The pilot came on the intercom, and tried to minimize his error. However, it is the pilot's responsibility to stay well enough away from another aircraft, to prevent aircrafts resulting from wake turbulence.

A plane getting too close is scary. I would first blame Air Traffic Control, they calculate this in accordance with the size of planes involved. The airline also should have minimum rules, I have been on several aborted landings when the pilot later explained that the conditions did not meet LH airlines minimum rules.
Ultimately, it is the pilot in charge.

12

 Jan 22, 2013 at 09:50 AM TexasJew Says:

Please stop making fun of a great TEXAS airline. Again, we've proven how to run an airline successfully. Always on time, always friendly service, etc...

13

 Jan 22, 2013 at 12:43 PM ShmuelG Says:

Reply to #9  
Ex-Jet Blue flyer Says:

One time, we were coming into JFK Airport on Jet Blue. The inexperienced pilot went too close to the wake turbulence of another jet plane in front of us. As a result, our plane went into a very dangerous tilt to the right. The right wing dipped very rapidly, no less than 40 degres. it felt as it we were going to crash, since we were less than 1,500 feet above the ground.The pilot came on the intercom, and tried to minimize his error. However, it is the pilot's responsibility to stay well enough away from another aircraft, to prevent aircrafts resulting from wake turbulence.

And what does it have to do with anything being discussed here? Did you just feel lonely?

14

 Jan 22, 2013 at 03:00 PM Ex Jet-Blue Flyer Says:

To #13- To Shmuel G- Your consistency pertaining to your abrasive/confrontational postings, always intrigues me! The reason that I mentioned Jet Blue, is that #2 mentioned that he preferred Jet Blue over Southwest.

To #12-Texas Jew- I've been on Southwest a number of times, and I've found some of their personnel as obnoxous as I've encountered on other airlines. For example, one time, at the Nashville Airport, there was an old lady on a wheelchair; the Southwest gate attendant initially refused to help board the plane, even when she was asked to by other passengers, including myself. When she finally assisted her, she was very mean to her, and acted as if she was doing her the biggest favor . Other times, I've encountered Southwest flight attendants who were very mouthy and rude! However, to Southwest's credit, it responds to such complaints, which it takes seriously.

To #11- Ultimately, it is the pilot's responsibility, not ATC, regarding separation rules. ATC frequently makes errors, regarding planes following others too closely. If there is a collision, the NTSB will come after the pilot first, and only cite ATC's negligence, as a secondary contributory factor.

15

 Jan 22, 2013 at 03:02 PM Mark Levin Says:

Reply to #9  
Ex-Jet Blue flyer Says:

One time, we were coming into JFK Airport on Jet Blue. The inexperienced pilot went too close to the wake turbulence of another jet plane in front of us. As a result, our plane went into a very dangerous tilt to the right. The right wing dipped very rapidly, no less than 40 degres. it felt as it we were going to crash, since we were less than 1,500 feet above the ground.The pilot came on the intercom, and tried to minimize his error. However, it is the pilot's responsibility to stay well enough away from another aircraft, to prevent aircrafts resulting from wake turbulence.

You obviously don't know how air traffic works so let me teach you.

The captain had NO say in how "close" he was to the other plane. When in the air, they must follow Air Traffic Control. Sometimes the wake coming off the plane in front doesn't dissipate as fast as it "should." I was on a flight into LAX and we got bounced around really bad from San Bernadino to downtown at which point the captain went for a go around. It wasn't his fault we were caught in wake turbulence.


If that was your only reason not to fly JetBlue, you should really work harder on finding a better reason.

16

 Jan 22, 2013 at 06:20 PM Ex Jet VBlue Flyer Says:

To: #15- Years ago, we were flying a Cessna 152 out of Port Columbus International Airport, near the vicinity of Rickenbacker Airport, when we noticed a large cargo jet in close proximity. The incompetent air traffic controller told us to make a turn, which would have placed us squarely in the wake turbulence of that large jet. We radioed ATC and told them that we couldn't make that turn, because of the above situation. He immediately countermanded his previous order. Otherwise, the Cessna (chas v'shalom) could have crashed! Also, the FAA rules are very specific as to separation among aircraft. Whenever we took off from Port Columbus, and were in back of a larger commercial jet, we would always routinely wait several minutes until the wake turbulence in front of us cleared. The air traffic controllers cannot force pilots to commit suicide. It is the pilot who must make the ultimate decision, as to the safety of his aircraft. On Dec. 16, 1960, a United DC-8 jet crashed into a TWA Constellation over Staten Island. ATC was clearly at fault in that accident, yet the CAB placed most of the blame on the United pilot. If something happens, the pilot is left holding the bag!

17

Sign-in to post a comment

Scroll Up
Advertisements:

Sell your scrap gold and broken jewelry and earn hard cash sell gold today!