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Jerusalem - Ramat Sharett Residents Angry Over Approval Of 3 Yeshivas

Published on: February 7, 2013 09:29 AM
By: Jerusalem Post
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Ultra-orthodox yeshiva students [illustrative] Photo:  REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun)Ultra-orthodox yeshiva students [illustrative] Photo:  REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun)

Jerusalem - Residents of the mixed religious/secular neighborhood of Ramat Sharett in Jerusalem are furious over the municipality’s approval of three yeshivas on the edge of their neighborhood at last week’s city council meeting.

On Thursday, the residents will hold a planning meeting with City Councilor Rachel Azaria (Yerushalmim) to try and submit a petition to the city’s Administrative Court to stop the yeshiva’s creation.

Last week, the City Council approved the creation of three yeshivas for haredi students on the border between the haredi neighborhood of Bayit Vegan and the mixed neighborhood of Ramat Sharett.

Azaria said this was an attempt to “blur the borders” between the haredi neighborhood and the surrounding area in order to make it easier for haredim to spread non-haredi areas.

“Jerusalem’s neighborhoods are diverse and complex, that’s our city’s beauty,” Azaria said on Wednesday.

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“Therefore, the declared city policy is to allocate public land and resources for the needs of each neighborhood’s residents in order to preserve its character. Ramat Sharett is a pluralistic neighborhood, with secular and modern orthodox working families. That’s why I was surprised to learn of the plan to build three haredi yeshivot on a public lot, a plan that seems intended to turn Ramat Sharett into a haredi neighborhood.”

A city spokeswoman said that the lot, in Kochav Square, is located in Bayit Vegan and not Ramat Sharett and it is the only place that the city can build classrooms in the area. The spokeswoman also said that the city is desperately trying to build the approximately 1,000 classrooms lacking in the capital for all segments of the population.

The haredi sector in particular has a large lack of classrooms.

“The municipality policy in the current tenure is building public institutions and educational buildings in neighborhoods from all segments of the population, and not in neighborhoods where residents are from another sector,” the spokeswoman said.

She stressed the city’s decision to cancel yeshivas planned for the Kiryat Hayovel neighborhood, another mixed secular/religious neighborhood, after residents objected to the “haredization” of their neighborhood.

Instead, the Secular Yeshiva, currently located in Ein Kerem, will move to Kiryat Hayovel.

Haredi city council members in charge of haredi education in the city would not return repeated calls for comment.

In the past, City Councilor Yitzhak Pindrus, who holds the haredi education portfolio, has highlighted the severe lack of classrooms for the city’s haredi students.


Content is provided courtesy of the Jerusalem Post


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1

 Feb 07, 2013 at 10:18 AM The Professor Says:

"in order to make it easier for haredim to spread non-haredi areas."

Mixed means mixed. I didn't realize that the antipathy by which haredim are regarded by some puts the former in the same context as the bubonic plague. Would the haredi members of that section object as vociferously as their chiloni neighbors if a non-kosher restaurant were to operate on Shabbos?

2

 Feb 07, 2013 at 10:30 AM Reb Yid Says:

It's like trying to build an eruv in the Hamptons.

3

 Feb 07, 2013 at 11:53 AM mytaxguy Says:

Very sad and a huge chilul Hashem. If the outside world reads that Jews are against yeshivas in their own country it serves as ammunition for them next time we try to build a shul or yeshiva in a secular area any where in the world

4

 Feb 07, 2013 at 12:48 PM greg8103 Says:

Reply to #1  
The Professor Says:

"in order to make it easier for haredim to spread non-haredi areas."

Mixed means mixed. I didn't realize that the antipathy by which haredim are regarded by some puts the former in the same context as the bubonic plague. Would the haredi members of that section object as vociferously as their chiloni neighbors if a non-kosher restaurant were to operate on Shabbos?

Yes!!!

5

 Feb 07, 2013 at 12:52 PM Pesach Says:

Maybe if the charedim were involved in more kiddush HaShem, people would view their presence in their community as a plus. Just a thought.

6

 Feb 07, 2013 at 01:30 PM shredready Says:

Reply to #1  
The Professor Says:

"in order to make it easier for haredim to spread non-haredi areas."

Mixed means mixed. I didn't realize that the antipathy by which haredim are regarded by some puts the former in the same context as the bubonic plague. Would the haredi members of that section object as vociferously as their chiloni neighbors if a non-kosher restaurant were to operate on Shabbos?

yes and worse

7

 Feb 07, 2013 at 01:32 PM shredready Says:

Reply to #1  
The Professor Says:

"in order to make it easier for haredim to spread non-haredi areas."

Mixed means mixed. I didn't realize that the antipathy by which haredim are regarded by some puts the former in the same context as the bubonic plague. Would the haredi members of that section object as vociferously as their chiloni neighbors if a non-kosher restaurant were to operate on Shabbos?

the problem is and historically one can see why. once they get a foothold in a community they pressure and demand that others comply with their believes like closing stores on shabbos closing streets and much more.

8

 Feb 07, 2013 at 01:34 PM shredready Says:

Reply to #3  
mytaxguy Says:

Very sad and a huge chilul Hashem. If the outside world reads that Jews are against yeshivas in their own country it serves as ammunition for them next time we try to build a shul or yeshiva in a secular area any where in the world

or the hatred that herideim have against others. Stoning them and their cars screaming Nazi and so on and of course not wanting to lift a finger to help the country they live in

9

 Feb 07, 2013 at 01:36 PM shredready Says:

before you condemn just think if it would be a religious zionist yeshiva and a yeshiva that send their students to the army and son would they still complain I would say no

10

 Feb 07, 2013 at 02:06 PM Yossi Says:

Maybe, if the chareidi yeshivalite would act as if they were actually a part of the neighborhood, the feeling might be different. Does anybody REALLY think that the yeshivot in question will encourage their students to mix with the secular and modern orthodox people of the area? Let's not kid ourselves.

11

 Feb 07, 2013 at 02:30 PM BakaMentch Says:

Reply to #1  
The Professor Says:

"in order to make it easier for haredim to spread non-haredi areas."

Mixed means mixed. I didn't realize that the antipathy by which haredim are regarded by some puts the former in the same context as the bubonic plague. Would the haredi members of that section object as vociferously as their chiloni neighbors if a non-kosher restaurant were to operate on Shabbos?

"Would the haredi members of that section object as vociferously as their chiloni neighbors if a non-kosher restaurant were to operate on Shabbos? ”. Was that question serious, or were you trying to make the point that the chiloni are acting just as poorly as the charedim do?

12

 Feb 07, 2013 at 03:27 PM 5TResident Says:

Reply to #2  
Reb Yid Says:

It's like trying to build an eruv in the Hamptons.

Except this is in Israel, which is supposed to be a Jewish state. If we encounter anti-religious bias in our own land, how can we expect not to encounter it anywhere else?

13

 Feb 07, 2013 at 04:46 PM favish Says:

Reply to #7  
shredready Says:

the problem is and historically one can see why. once they get a foothold in a community they pressure and demand that others comply with their believes like closing stores on shabbos closing streets and much more.

...and u as ehrlicher yid should be very happy about it as 'kol yiroel areivim zeh lazeh'

14

 Feb 07, 2013 at 04:50 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #7  
shredready Says:

the problem is and historically one can see why. once they get a foothold in a community they pressure and demand that others comply with their believes like closing stores on shabbos closing streets and much more.

'..... thier believes..' just like de rasha of the haggadah. 'ulefi shehotzi...min haklall hacai es shinov' and tell us what are ur beliefs?

15

 Feb 07, 2013 at 10:51 PM The Professor Says:

Reply to #11  
BakaMentch Says:

"Would the haredi members of that section object as vociferously as their chiloni neighbors if a non-kosher restaurant were to operate on Shabbos? ”. Was that question serious, or were you trying to make the point that the chiloni are acting just as poorly as the charedim do?

I would hope that the chareidim would set an example for everyone, and try to convince the owners of the non-kosher through quiet, non-confrontational negotiations to become kosher - in order to attract more business. If chilonim act in a manner which is not demeaning, the chareidim surely should not regard their actions as a paradigm for their own response. Es past nisht!

16

 Feb 09, 2013 at 08:42 PM making-machaa Says:

the chilonim will never be happy if there is more torah its the biggest threat to their existence like its the biggest fight with the yetzer hora

17

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