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New York - Prestigious Award For Stern College Student Who Scores Big In Class And On The Court

Published on: February 25, 2013 12:10 PM
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Rebecca Yosher,Rebecca Yosher,

New York - A 20 year old Stern College student has made history at Yeshiva University, as the first female student ever to be recognized by a nationwide program that honors students who excel in both athletics and academics.

Rebecca Yoshor, who is majoring in English Literature and minoring in Psychology, has a 3.97 grade point average at the college and is also a junior forward on the women’s Maccabees basketball team.  The Houston native, who was named to the Capital One’s NCAA Division III Academic All-America women’s team for the 2012-2013 academic year, is just one of 816 students to be recognized annually for their accomplishments both in the classroom and on the playing field.

“I am incredibly honored to be the first student at Stern to receive this kind of recognition and am sure I won’t be the last,” Miss Yoshor told VIN News.  “We have so many amazing student athletes at Stern.”

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Miss Yoshor, who is currently contemplating careers in either public relations or advertising, says that it takes effort to juggle her responsibilities as both an athlete and a student.

“I balance my practice and game schedule and heavy course load by managing my time well,” explained Miss Yoshor.  “I try to be truly present and give my best effort in whatever I am doing.”

This is the 5’11 student’s second season playing on the Stern College basketball team and she has been named to the Hudson Valley Women’s Athletic All Conference team twice as well as having been selected as player of the week four times this season by the conference.  Only one other student at Yeshiva University has ever been recognized by the Capital One Academic All America honors program.

“Rebecca is a great person and a great athlete,” said Joe Bednarsh, director of athletics at Yeshiva University.  “Her name will go down in history for her accomplishments here at the school and she is a role model for young Jewish girls who can follow her example and excel both academically and athletically.”


More of today's headlines

Albany, NY - A veteran New York Assemblyman on Monday stood by his decision to wear blackface makeup, an Afro wig and a basketball jersey to a costume party in the face... Lubbock, Texas - National Weather Service officials in Kansas and Oklahoma issued blizzard warnings and watches through late Monday as the storm packing snow and high...

 

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Read Comments (29)  —  Post Yours »

1

 Feb 25, 2013 at 12:44 PM sechelyoshor Says:

I ask the following question with respect, because I just don't know and would like to understand how this works:
When the Stern basketball team competes, how do they do so in a manner that is compatible with the basic laws of tznius? I assume there are men in the audience watching and that some of the men are family and community members. Is that correct? Are their uniforms somehow halachically ok?

I recall attending a modern orthodox day school as a kid/teen. Each team had cheerleaders wearing mini-skirts dancing in front of all of us guys. For some reason that was acceptable. Is that still an accepted standard?

That was a very long time ago. I'm wondering if there is a concern at Stern about this and some sort of workaround for having a woman's basketball team that competes publicly, or would my question be considered prudish.

2

 Feb 25, 2013 at 01:59 PM blk123 Says:

from what I understand, Stern lets women compete in t-shirts and shorts. They can layer longer sleeves under the tee and wear skirts over the shorts, which some do. There are also many Stern students who would not participate in these competitions out of tznius concerns.

3

 Feb 25, 2013 at 02:07 PM clear-thinker Says:

Reply to #1  
sechelyoshor Says:

I ask the following question with respect, because I just don't know and would like to understand how this works:
When the Stern basketball team competes, how do they do so in a manner that is compatible with the basic laws of tznius? I assume there are men in the audience watching and that some of the men are family and community members. Is that correct? Are their uniforms somehow halachically ok?

I recall attending a modern orthodox day school as a kid/teen. Each team had cheerleaders wearing mini-skirts dancing in front of all of us guys. For some reason that was acceptable. Is that still an accepted standard?

That was a very long time ago. I'm wondering if there is a concern at Stern about this and some sort of workaround for having a woman's basketball team that competes publicly, or would my question be considered prudish.

Respect? I think not. You want to know how mo day schools view tznius. You want to know if their Rabbonim agree with your view of "the basic law of tznius" Or do they follow another definition which you, and possibly your Rabbonim, think wrong.
Go to a game and get an answer. However, I suggest you don't look to closely incase your sensibilities, or religious views, are somehow challenged.
Why not just congratulate someone for her accomplishments?
That is what I plan to do....Congratulations Rebecca!

4

 Feb 25, 2013 at 02:07 PM Erlich Says:

Reply to #1  
sechelyoshor Says:

I ask the following question with respect, because I just don't know and would like to understand how this works:
When the Stern basketball team competes, how do they do so in a manner that is compatible with the basic laws of tznius? I assume there are men in the audience watching and that some of the men are family and community members. Is that correct? Are their uniforms somehow halachically ok?

I recall attending a modern orthodox day school as a kid/teen. Each team had cheerleaders wearing mini-skirts dancing in front of all of us guys. For some reason that was acceptable. Is that still an accepted standard?

That was a very long time ago. I'm wondering if there is a concern at Stern about this and some sort of workaround for having a woman's basketball team that competes publicly, or would my question be considered prudish.

Even in Saudi Arabia, they're now allowing girls to play basketball. This is not Satmar tznius, where they don't allow women to even drive a car.

5

 Feb 25, 2013 at 03:24 PM esq Says:

Hooray for her. To anyone worried about tznuis, get off the internet wherre you might actually catch a glimpse of (gasp) knees.

6

 Feb 25, 2013 at 03:25 PM esq Says:

Reply to #4  
Erlich Says:

Even in Saudi Arabia, they're now allowing girls to play basketball. This is not Satmar tznius, where they don't allow women to even drive a car.

not yet... Its only just begun. As we all know, years ago thiings were different - everywhere.\

7

 Feb 25, 2013 at 03:30 PM TexasJew Says:

Another great Texan. Proud to know her and her family.
I remember watching her play ball as early as three years old. Very talented and very tzinius off the court.

8

 Feb 25, 2013 at 03:34 PM rationalman Says:

Reply to #1  
sechelyoshor Says:

I ask the following question with respect, because I just don't know and would like to understand how this works:
When the Stern basketball team competes, how do they do so in a manner that is compatible with the basic laws of tznius? I assume there are men in the audience watching and that some of the men are family and community members. Is that correct? Are their uniforms somehow halachically ok?

I recall attending a modern orthodox day school as a kid/teen. Each team had cheerleaders wearing mini-skirts dancing in front of all of us guys. For some reason that was acceptable. Is that still an accepted standard?

That was a very long time ago. I'm wondering if there is a concern at Stern about this and some sort of workaround for having a woman's basketball team that competes publicly, or would my question be considered prudish.

they wear baggy shorts that cover their knees, and they wear a shell under the basketball jersey.....is it ok now

9

 Feb 25, 2013 at 04:15 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #4  
Erlich Says:

Even in Saudi Arabia, they're now allowing girls to play basketball. This is not Satmar tznius, where they don't allow women to even drive a car.

No need to bash Chasidim... How about opening a Shulchan Aruch or a Ramah? Just because you aren't able to mentally comprehend certain laws doesn't mean you are allowed to break them. This goes for laws of your country, state, or religion.

10

 Feb 25, 2013 at 04:35 PM HappyOlah Says:

If you look at the official team t-shirt she's wearing, you can see that it has long sleeves and a closed neckline
.

11

 Feb 25, 2013 at 05:01 PM Anonymous Says:

Just an FYI... for anyone not familiar with the laws of Tzniut... Tzniut is not just about your clothing. Tzniut is also how a person walks, talks, or acts in front of men.

I don't know if this young lady plays ball in front of men... If she is - even if wearing a burka she would be breaching the laws of Tzniut.

12

 Feb 25, 2013 at 06:36 PM username Says:

1) Mazel tov Rebecca.
2) If she's at Stern, playing in a girl's league, and men show up, it's on them, not her. It's up to a man not to put himself in such a situation. She's not playing in the middle of the street.

13

 Feb 25, 2013 at 06:44 PM Halacha is not chassidus Says:

Reply to #9  
Anonymous Says:

No need to bash Chasidim... How about opening a Shulchan Aruch or a Ramah? Just because you aren't able to mentally comprehend certain laws doesn't mean you are allowed to break them. This goes for laws of your country, state, or religion.

THANK YOU!!!!
I am married in to a MO family and sorry to burst everyones bubble... the lack of tzniyus is atrocious!! tzniyus is NOT chassidic laws!!! It is part of the very foundation of our religion. Read about Sara- In chumash.
How is sleeveless, low cut neck lines, mini skirts, uncovered hair...or covered with a 5 inch wig in the center of natural hair- considered orthodox?

not even mentioning the blatant chilul Shabbos I observed them doing and saying it is ok.- taking an elevator on shabbos, adjusting the air conditioner, driving with a cab for a non emergency event..... or complete lack of shomer negiah- which they admit to.....
all this was accepted as religious. If one does not want to observe certain commandments that are clear in the Torah- then don't be a coward and delusional.... I am not perfect and have broken commandments- but I own up to it and do teshuva.
chassidim are not perfect- some are far from perfect- but why are you mixing apples and oranges....2 wrongs do not make a right.

14

 Feb 25, 2013 at 07:11 PM Velvel Says:

Reply to #1  
sechelyoshor Says:

I ask the following question with respect, because I just don't know and would like to understand how this works:
When the Stern basketball team competes, how do they do so in a manner that is compatible with the basic laws of tznius? I assume there are men in the audience watching and that some of the men are family and community members. Is that correct? Are their uniforms somehow halachically ok?

I recall attending a modern orthodox day school as a kid/teen. Each team had cheerleaders wearing mini-skirts dancing in front of all of us guys. For some reason that was acceptable. Is that still an accepted standard?

That was a very long time ago. I'm wondering if there is a concern at Stern about this and some sort of workaround for having a woman's basketball team that competes publicly, or would my question be considered prudish.

Take your mind out of the gutter. What these girls wear is NOT your business. STAY in your DALED AMOS and leave the rest of us alone.

15

 Feb 25, 2013 at 08:27 PM MarkTwain2 Says:

Reply to #1  
sechelyoshor Says:

I ask the following question with respect, because I just don't know and would like to understand how this works:
When the Stern basketball team competes, how do they do so in a manner that is compatible with the basic laws of tznius? I assume there are men in the audience watching and that some of the men are family and community members. Is that correct? Are their uniforms somehow halachically ok?

I recall attending a modern orthodox day school as a kid/teen. Each team had cheerleaders wearing mini-skirts dancing in front of all of us guys. For some reason that was acceptable. Is that still an accepted standard?

That was a very long time ago. I'm wondering if there is a concern at Stern about this and some sort of workaround for having a woman's basketball team that competes publicly, or would my question be considered prudish.

Let them worry about their own Tzinius.

16

 Feb 25, 2013 at 08:29 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #13  
Halacha is not chassidus Says:

THANK YOU!!!!
I am married in to a MO family and sorry to burst everyones bubble... the lack of tzniyus is atrocious!! tzniyus is NOT chassidic laws!!! It is part of the very foundation of our religion. Read about Sara- In chumash.
How is sleeveless, low cut neck lines, mini skirts, uncovered hair...or covered with a 5 inch wig in the center of natural hair- considered orthodox?

not even mentioning the blatant chilul Shabbos I observed them doing and saying it is ok.- taking an elevator on shabbos, adjusting the air conditioner, driving with a cab for a non emergency event..... or complete lack of shomer negiah- which they admit to.....
all this was accepted as religious. If one does not want to observe certain commandments that are clear in the Torah- then don't be a coward and delusional.... I am not perfect and have broken commandments- but I own up to it and do teshuva.
chassidim are not perfect- some are far from perfect- but why are you mixing apples and oranges....2 wrongs do not make a right.

It is up to Hashem to judge, not man (or woman). You work on yourself, and stop judging others. There are plenty of MO jews who dont do any of the above, and there are others who do. Each will be judged against their own potential, not yours, and certainly not a set of laws that are sometimes more cultural than theological. (granted tzniyus has a significant element of cultural norm in the halacha, but that's far from the point here).

In the meantime, this young woman has a made a kiddush hashem. In our current golus we need more kiddushei hashem and ahavas chinam. not senseless Jew bashing.

17

 Feb 25, 2013 at 10:17 PM kweanbea Says:

Reply to #13  
Halacha is not chassidus Says:

THANK YOU!!!!
I am married in to a MO family and sorry to burst everyones bubble... the lack of tzniyus is atrocious!! tzniyus is NOT chassidic laws!!! It is part of the very foundation of our religion. Read about Sara- In chumash.
How is sleeveless, low cut neck lines, mini skirts, uncovered hair...or covered with a 5 inch wig in the center of natural hair- considered orthodox?

not even mentioning the blatant chilul Shabbos I observed them doing and saying it is ok.- taking an elevator on shabbos, adjusting the air conditioner, driving with a cab for a non emergency event..... or complete lack of shomer negiah- which they admit to.....
all this was accepted as religious. If one does not want to observe certain commandments that are clear in the Torah- then don't be a coward and delusional.... I am not perfect and have broken commandments- but I own up to it and do teshuva.
chassidim are not perfect- some are far from perfect- but why are you mixing apples and oranges....2 wrongs do not make a right.

I've never seen such wholesale MO-bashing.

Boy it must be a lot of fun at your family simchas and yom tovim when you have to spend time with your in-laws.

18

 Feb 25, 2013 at 10:32 PM wondering Says:

Reply to #13  
Halacha is not chassidus Says:

THANK YOU!!!!
I am married in to a MO family and sorry to burst everyones bubble... the lack of tzniyus is atrocious!! tzniyus is NOT chassidic laws!!! It is part of the very foundation of our religion. Read about Sara- In chumash.
How is sleeveless, low cut neck lines, mini skirts, uncovered hair...or covered with a 5 inch wig in the center of natural hair- considered orthodox?

not even mentioning the blatant chilul Shabbos I observed them doing and saying it is ok.- taking an elevator on shabbos, adjusting the air conditioner, driving with a cab for a non emergency event..... or complete lack of shomer negiah- which they admit to.....
all this was accepted as religious. If one does not want to observe certain commandments that are clear in the Torah- then don't be a coward and delusional.... I am not perfect and have broken commandments- but I own up to it and do teshuva.
chassidim are not perfect- some are far from perfect- but why are you mixing apples and oranges....2 wrongs do not make a right.

"They" admit to? Being married to a MO family you should know better. The whole point of MO is that it is not a cult, people dont answer to one Rabbi or to one Vaad Hatznius but rather people think for themselves and choose their own Rabbis (see Perkei Avot if you have a problem with that)..There is no "they". There are lots of communities with different standards. More likely than not, even though you dont realize it, you are probably married into a conservadox family, not an MO family. They may send their kids to an MO school (lot more of them than conservative schools) and belong to an MO shul but doesnt mean they are MO. By the way being judgmental of people who clearly are trying to be at least mostly Shomer Mitzvos is something that requires teshuva ewhile you are at it. For that matter being judgmental at all, does. it is not for us to judge.

19

 Feb 25, 2013 at 11:21 PM Mendel Says:

Reply to #13  
Halacha is not chassidus Says:

THANK YOU!!!!
I am married in to a MO family and sorry to burst everyones bubble... the lack of tzniyus is atrocious!! tzniyus is NOT chassidic laws!!! It is part of the very foundation of our religion. Read about Sara- In chumash.
How is sleeveless, low cut neck lines, mini skirts, uncovered hair...or covered with a 5 inch wig in the center of natural hair- considered orthodox?

not even mentioning the blatant chilul Shabbos I observed them doing and saying it is ok.- taking an elevator on shabbos, adjusting the air conditioner, driving with a cab for a non emergency event..... or complete lack of shomer negiah- which they admit to.....
all this was accepted as religious. If one does not want to observe certain commandments that are clear in the Torah- then don't be a coward and delusional.... I am not perfect and have broken commandments- but I own up to it and do teshuva.
chassidim are not perfect- some are far from perfect- but why are you mixing apples and oranges....2 wrongs do not make a right.

I doubt your story completely. You are poster #1 pushing your anti MO agenda. Go crawl back under your rock, you hater.

21

 Feb 25, 2013 at 11:36 PM Canadian Says:

Reply to #18  
wondering Says:

"They" admit to? Being married to a MO family you should know better. The whole point of MO is that it is not a cult, people dont answer to one Rabbi or to one Vaad Hatznius but rather people think for themselves and choose their own Rabbis (see Perkei Avot if you have a problem with that)..There is no "they". There are lots of communities with different standards. More likely than not, even though you dont realize it, you are probably married into a conservadox family, not an MO family. They may send their kids to an MO school (lot more of them than conservative schools) and belong to an MO shul but doesnt mean they are MO. By the way being judgmental of people who clearly are trying to be at least mostly Shomer Mitzvos is something that requires teshuva ewhile you are at it. For that matter being judgmental at all, does. it is not for us to judge.

While it may not be nice to point out, the standard of Tznius & Shomer Negiah happens to be somewhat lacking in the MO community (why are commentors insinuating there are different standards as if to deny the above when by virtue of the fact the label MO for those who call themselves as such is just that as well as other issues). That is not to say that other important Mitzvot don't lack in the Charedi communities. So best not to bash either group.

22

 Feb 26, 2013 at 02:03 AM SF2K1 Says:

Reply to #13  
Halacha is not chassidus Says:

THANK YOU!!!!
I am married in to a MO family and sorry to burst everyones bubble... the lack of tzniyus is atrocious!! tzniyus is NOT chassidic laws!!! It is part of the very foundation of our religion. Read about Sara- In chumash.
How is sleeveless, low cut neck lines, mini skirts, uncovered hair...or covered with a 5 inch wig in the center of natural hair- considered orthodox?

not even mentioning the blatant chilul Shabbos I observed them doing and saying it is ok.- taking an elevator on shabbos, adjusting the air conditioner, driving with a cab for a non emergency event..... or complete lack of shomer negiah- which they admit to.....
all this was accepted as religious. If one does not want to observe certain commandments that are clear in the Torah- then don't be a coward and delusional.... I am not perfect and have broken commandments- but I own up to it and do teshuva.
chassidim are not perfect- some are far from perfect- but why are you mixing apples and oranges....2 wrongs do not make a right.

Tznius isn't a "chassidic law" but if your life depended on it you couldn't tell me where hilchos tznius ended and chassidishe chumra begins. Leave them to their poskim and spend less time judging others.

24

 Feb 26, 2013 at 08:45 AM monalisa Says:

Reply to #3  
clear-thinker Says:

Respect? I think not. You want to know how mo day schools view tznius. You want to know if their Rabbonim agree with your view of "the basic law of tznius" Or do they follow another definition which you, and possibly your Rabbonim, think wrong.
Go to a game and get an answer. However, I suggest you don't look to closely incase your sensibilities, or religious views, are somehow challenged.
Why not just congratulate someone for her accomplishments?
That is what I plan to do....Congratulations Rebecca!

You want to talk about respect? Well, your answer to #1 was way over the top. I don't get why a carefully worded & I think very respectful & genuine question generated such venom & anger. The man asked a question, a fair one. At no time did he criticize or denigrate Miss Yosher or her school. Why is there such a knee-jerk, nasty reaction from someone every time an innocent question is posed? Guilty conscience about your own lack of religious/moral values? Anger issues? Or just plain old stupidity??

25

 Feb 26, 2013 at 09:28 AM clear-thinker Says:

Reply to #24  
monalisa Says:

You want to talk about respect? Well, your answer to #1 was way over the top. I don't get why a carefully worded & I think very respectful & genuine question generated such venom & anger. The man asked a question, a fair one. At no time did he criticize or denigrate Miss Yosher or her school. Why is there such a knee-jerk, nasty reaction from someone every time an innocent question is posed? Guilty conscience about your own lack of religious/moral values? Anger issues? Or just plain old stupidity??

I have no anger issues. My conscious is clear about my religious/moral values. Do you think that my reaction was anywhere close to #23 who is ready to break his daughter's leg and place her in a wheel chair?
I disagree with you that #1 was asking a respectful or genuine question. If he attended a m.o. school he knows that their view of what is proper within tzmius is different from his understanding.
As to stupidity, you are free to view me any way you want. I, however, will end my comment with the view that tznius does not mean we have to blot out all accomplishments of women. We do not have to edit photos to remove any women from them. We can turn to Rebecca and congratulate her on her accomplishments.

26

 Feb 26, 2013 at 09:37 AM SG Says:

I hope you do not have any daughters.

28

 Feb 26, 2013 at 09:40 AM monalisa Says:

Now you'll all get your knives out for me. Oh, well. Not the first time! LOL

29

 Feb 26, 2013 at 10:33 AM FullabullaRebbe Says:

Stunning display of shtetl culture.

30

 Feb 26, 2013 at 10:43 AM clear-thinker Says:

Reply to #28  
monalisa Says:

Now you'll all get your knives out for me. Oh, well. Not the first time! LOL

Knives, oh no. I may disagree with you, but you have made me think. Do I have a lack of religious and moral values? I don't think so, but it is something I struggle with every day. I believe religion should, in addition to everything else, make me a moral person. I realize that some day I will face Hashem and answer for my actions. I am not as sure as some here that I am always correct.
I would not break my daughters legs for any disagreement over basketball. I try to respect others who are struggling in their attempt to do right.
I realize that you have strong beliefs. I hope that you struggle with them every day, since I believe these struggles are what brings us to Hashem.

31

 Feb 27, 2013 at 03:12 AM modern orthodox= double standard Says:

it is quite funny to see how members of the modern orthodox community always come back with the same comments "don't judge... it's loshon hara... you need to do tshuva for judging... " I am not judging. Of course only HaShem is the judge.

but do you use the same language of defense when you attack chassidim?
Live according to the standards you want others to treat you with.
Mostly modern orthodoxy is full of contradictions, double standards and hypocrisy..... I am sure not all of modern orthodoxy fall under that category- as we can never sterotype one group..... but definitely- the modern orthodox community have much more hate (yes - hate and its a strong word) towards the chassidish or yeshivish community than vice versa. I know because I come from the latter and married in to MO and have been treated with such disgust and contempt and heard the way they mock and ridicule anyone frummer than them- while ALL their grandparents- and fathers were chassidish before the holocaust.
Is it your subconscious telling you that maybe maybe halacha does matter..... you guys judge too and talk loshon hara too.... so please stop pretending like halacha doesn't matter & stop judging us.

32

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