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New York - Bloomberg Embarks On Hearing Loss Prevention

Published on: March 6, 2013 10:04 AM
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New York - A New York Post (http://bit.ly/WJpnCv) exclusive today says that New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s new crusade is “preventing New Yorkers from going deaf.”

According to the POST, armed with a study showing that hearing loss among teens is up 30 percent between 1988 and 2006, the mayor’s health officials are embarking on a campaign aimed at warring young people about the risks of listening to music at high volume on personal MP3 players.

The Hearing Loss Prevention Media Campaign is targeting teens and young adults through social media sites like Facebook and Twitter.

“With public and private support, a public-education campaign is being developed to raise awareness about safe use of personal music players…and risks of loud and long listening,” said Nancy Clark, the city Health Department’s assistant commissioner of environmental-disease prevention.

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The cost of the campaign will be $250,000, and is being financed through a grant from the Fund for Public Health, the Health Department’s fundraising arm.

Bloomberg has long been a proponent of noise reduction in the city, signing into law in 2005—-‘Operation Silent Night’—-which cracked down on noise levels made by jackhammers on construction sites and the level of noise blaring out of night clubs.

Bloomberg’s new campaign is targeting the “iPod generation,” the first to use “buds” that are inserted directly into the ear.

Health experts say that, due to the fact that new players hold thousands of songs and have longer life batteries, prolonged loud listening is commonplace.

An iPod at maximum volume currently reaches 115 decibels, exceeding the 85 decibels researchers say is safe.


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1

 Mar 06, 2013 at 10:48 AM Anonymous Says:

I am among those who resents the mayor's intrusion into our lives, with his incessant efforts to control and legislate matters of personal choice. Here, however, I am more generous and will be a bit kinder in my opinion.

The noise issue certainly involves personal audio equipment that has enabled so many to remain plugged in for much of their waking time. Those who are in such constant listening mode are distracted from much else in life, missing much, sometimes in danger when in public. But I do hope that there can be intervention to limit the volume of music at chasunas. This has been a topic of discussion for many years, and things have only gotten worse. One does not need to stand near the amplifiers to have ear splitting experiences at a simcha. I personally find it impossible to communicate with anyone at simchas, unable to raise my voice over the decibels of the music, and completely unable to hear anything. Some people remain deluded that the volume makes the simcha. So sad. Might legislation work?

2

 Mar 06, 2013 at 10:54 AM sambayon Says:

I hope he cracks down on musicians by the chasenes, the plain bust our ears

3

 Mar 06, 2013 at 11:09 AM ComeOn Says:

Reply to #1  
Anonymous Says:

I am among those who resents the mayor's intrusion into our lives, with his incessant efforts to control and legislate matters of personal choice. Here, however, I am more generous and will be a bit kinder in my opinion.

The noise issue certainly involves personal audio equipment that has enabled so many to remain plugged in for much of their waking time. Those who are in such constant listening mode are distracted from much else in life, missing much, sometimes in danger when in public. But I do hope that there can be intervention to limit the volume of music at chasunas. This has been a topic of discussion for many years, and things have only gotten worse. One does not need to stand near the amplifiers to have ear splitting experiences at a simcha. I personally find it impossible to communicate with anyone at simchas, unable to raise my voice over the decibels of the music, and completely unable to hear anything. Some people remain deluded that the volume makes the simcha. So sad. Might legislation work?

Legislation is not the answer.
It may work in the short term, however, government intrusion into our lives has never helped.
What will help is if people decide that they will not hire bands that play too loudly, or if you don't stay at weddings that are uncomfortable and then let the baal simcha why you were unhappy.
Before you be "generous" to Chairman Bloomberg and let him ban earphones, please remember that large bottles of soda are harmful if 1 person consumes the whole thing, not when a poor family of 8 splits it.
Headphones are harmful when the volume is set to max, but are very helpful at safe levels when you don't want to hear what the person sitting next to you on the subway is listening to.
The road to socialism is paved with good intentions.

4

 Mar 06, 2013 at 11:16 AM Yochanan Bull Says:

"But I do hope that there can be intervention to limit the volume of music at chasunas."

Why don't you come and live in the so-called backward and socialist United Kingdom where municipal intervention in and the prosecution of unnecessarily high noise levels in the public domain have been standard practice for decades?

All it took was a simple Statutory Instrument - not even a law. Now, even if my neighbor holds a noisy party that continues beyond 11:00 PM all I need do is lodge a complaint with the police. If he does not comply with an order to cease and desist he will very soon find himself under arrest, and his guests will find themselves with no party.

But, that's what we do in a small, near third-world, island off the coast of Europe as your Baltimore correspondent once described this country. What do we know about solving problems quickly? Meanwhile, in the goldeneh medineh, you all continue to platz.

5

 Mar 06, 2013 at 11:18 AM Moish Says:

I commend the Mayor for raising pulic awareness on this matter. Many are unaware of the airbuds hearing loss risks. I fail to understand why bands continue to amplify music to intolerable levels at our simchos. The simcha is plenty enjoyable with lively dancing at much lower levels.

6

 Mar 06, 2013 at 11:21 AM Moish Says:

This is not an intrusion. It is raising public awareness. If he makes loud music illegal that would be an intrusion. We should appreciate his help in warning us of the risks.

7

 Mar 06, 2013 at 11:31 AM &Mrs; AmHaAretz Says:

? How many decibels is the sound of those excruciatingly high-pitched, piercing, actual-torture-to-the-ears FIRE ALARMS, that have been installed in public places (like schools, department stores, city halls) over the past twenty years? And what has been the role of these awful fire alarms in damaging people's hearing?

8

 Mar 06, 2013 at 01:01 PM Reb Yid Says:

Bloomberg's noise annoys me more hours of the day than loudspeakers and fire trucks.

9

 Mar 06, 2013 at 01:27 PM Butterfly Says:

How about these loud radios in cars that blast and continuous horn-honking?(Which is supposed? to be ticketed for but never is?)

10

 Mar 06, 2013 at 01:49 PM enlightened-yid Says:

Reply to #7  
&Mrs; AmHaAretz Says:

? How many decibels is the sound of those excruciatingly high-pitched, piercing, actual-torture-to-the-ears FIRE ALARMS, that have been installed in public places (like schools, department stores, city halls) over the past twenty years? And what has been the role of these awful fire alarms in damaging people's hearing?

What asylum do you live in where fire alarms go off daily for hours? The pitch of a sound is not the culprit, it is the decibel of sound for certain amount of time of exposure that causes hearing loss. Like, FDNY fire trucks are banned from using certain mechanical sirens because they are too loud and contribute to hearing loss.

11

 Mar 06, 2013 at 01:59 PM chayamom Says:

Reply to #5  
Moish Says:

I commend the Mayor for raising pulic awareness on this matter. Many are unaware of the airbuds hearing loss risks. I fail to understand why bands continue to amplify music to intolerable levels at our simchos. The simcha is plenty enjoyable with lively dancing at much lower levels.

Oh please! Most people are aware of the dangers of loud music. The people who don't care won't care despite the "awareness" the Mayor is raising! Wedding music is catering to the young who believe to have a leibidige wedding the music needs to be loud. Since the chasan and kallah fall into the "young" category the music will be loud!

12

 Mar 06, 2013 at 02:18 PM Facts1 Says:

Or those new rumbler tumbler police cars. Government can do anything and everything.

13

 Mar 06, 2013 at 02:19 PM StevenWright Says:

I think his recommendation will fall on deaf ears...

14

 Mar 06, 2013 at 03:05 PM mewhoze Says:

RebYid, you made me laugh!

15

 Mar 06, 2013 at 06:11 PM TexasJew Says:

Now the thieves will have to put a silencer on their guns before killing someone.

16

 Mar 06, 2013 at 11:39 PM hearing loss victim Says:

Reply to #1  
Anonymous Says:

I am among those who resents the mayor's intrusion into our lives, with his incessant efforts to control and legislate matters of personal choice. Here, however, I am more generous and will be a bit kinder in my opinion.

The noise issue certainly involves personal audio equipment that has enabled so many to remain plugged in for much of their waking time. Those who are in such constant listening mode are distracted from much else in life, missing much, sometimes in danger when in public. But I do hope that there can be intervention to limit the volume of music at chasunas. This has been a topic of discussion for many years, and things have only gotten worse. One does not need to stand near the amplifiers to have ear splitting experiences at a simcha. I personally find it impossible to communicate with anyone at simchas, unable to raise my voice over the decibels of the music, and completely unable to hear anything. Some people remain deluded that the volume makes the simcha. So sad. Might legislation work?

i agree with you # 1 this is one very necessary intervention; but the mayor cannot come to our simchas. . the musicians all wear earplugs so they "don't care.
very strong language info must be put out there so people musicians and baalei simchos will finally understand the real danger. loss of hearing is no fun

17

 Mar 07, 2013 at 01:21 AM I_Am_Me Says:

He's at it again!!!
I just don't understand it, NYC has many homeless (especially after Sandy) people, a money flux problem & more. Therefore, why is he spending 250,000 on this rule when he can be helping so many poor people & the economy with that funding?!

18

 Mar 07, 2013 at 09:39 AM Howard né Chaim Says:

Reply to #17  
I_Am_Me Says:

He's at it again!!!
I just don't understand it, NYC has many homeless (especially after Sandy) people, a money flux problem & more. Therefore, why is he spending 250,000 on this rule when he can be helping so many poor people & the economy with that funding?!

Had you ever stopped to consider that the Mayor and his advisors are taking a long-term view of the noise problem? Do you really think that a prudent investment of a lousy $250,000 will preclude (that means "prevent" for the ignorant amongst us) aiding the city's poor and the economy?

In my youth (early 1970s) I worked on the ramp at was was then still known as Lod Airport, probably one of the noisiest work environments in the country. Yes, our employer furnished us with ear muffs, but very few of us had the seichel to realize what damage was being caused to our ears. Believe me, we all know now, though!

People may consider the mayor's initiative as intrusive, but they will grudgingly thank him later on in life. Aside from that pious thought, all of us know the immediate annoyance caused by over-loud music emanating from a nearby simcha hall or even a party in a private home. Under current legislation in NYC it would seem that nothing can be done to prevent this invasive and unnecessary modern-day plague

19

 Mar 07, 2013 at 03:04 PM I_Am_Me Says:

Reply to #18  
Howard né Chaim Says:

Had you ever stopped to consider that the Mayor and his advisors are taking a long-term view of the noise problem? Do you really think that a prudent investment of a lousy $250,000 will preclude (that means "prevent" for the ignorant amongst us) aiding the city's poor and the economy?

In my youth (early 1970s) I worked on the ramp at was was then still known as Lod Airport, probably one of the noisiest work environments in the country. Yes, our employer furnished us with ear muffs, but very few of us had the seichel to realize what damage was being caused to our ears. Believe me, we all know now, though!

People may consider the mayor's initiative as intrusive, but they will grudgingly thank him later on in life. Aside from that pious thought, all of us know the immediate annoyance caused by over-loud music emanating from a nearby simcha hall or even a party in a private home. Under current legislation in NYC it would seem that nothing can be done to prevent this invasive and unnecessary modern-day plague

Wow! I think you need to step off your soap box (for the ignorant amongst us it means stop ranting). I reiterate Bumburg, is nothing but an arrogant, ignorant, fool, who thinks $250,000 of tax payers money is best spent on curbing ear buds/head phones

20

 Mar 07, 2013 at 11:53 PM Anonymous Says:

I think that in many cases the real culprits in the too-loud chasuna scene are the musicians themselves. I know of situations where the band refused the baal simcha's request to reduce the volume. Apparently they're afraid that if they're not loud enough, the won't attract the next customer (presumably they've already been paid for this gig).

Doesn't Israel send inspectors with meters to simchas to check the volume?

21

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