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Jerusalem - Matza Exports Seen Falling 5-10% Due To Economic Crisis

Published on: March 23, 2009 09:32 AM
By: Globes
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Jerusalem - Last year was good for matza exports, which rose 31% to $12 million, the Israel Export and International Cooperation Institute reports.

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Top matza export destinations in 2008 were the US, which accounted for 59% of exports amounting to $7 million; Italy - 10% of exports, worth $1.2 million; the UK - 5% of exports, worth $621,000; France - 5% of exports, worth $600,000; Belgium - 5% of exports, worth $560,000; Canada - 3% of exports, worth $390,000; and Australia, with $345,000 worth of matza exports.

Export Institute director general Avi Hefetz attributed last year’s growth of matza exports to the US to contracts closed before the economic crisis worsened. He said the US Jewish community, which had tended to celebrate Passover at hotels in recent years, will celebrate at home this year. The Export Institute predicts that matza exports will fall 5-10% in 2009.



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Read Comments (5)  —  Post Yours »

1

 Mar 23, 2009 at 09:34 AM Anonymous Says:

Does this article seem to imply that people eat less matzoh when they are home than when they are away? That seems odd to me. In NY Aviv Matzoh made in Israel is less expensive than US made matzoh. Why would people here buy US made matzoh rather than Aviv?

I am reminded of the time I was in a supermarket and saw a woman buying matzoh, ham, and other items. I said to her that matzoh and ham is a stange combination. She said that she isn't Jewish. I imagined her going home and making a ham on matzoh sandwich!I wonder what percentage of matzoh sold in the US is eaten by non Jews?

2

 Mar 23, 2009 at 10:21 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #1  
Anonymous Says:

Does this article seem to imply that people eat less matzoh when they are home than when they are away? That seems odd to me. In NY Aviv Matzoh made in Israel is less expensive than US made matzoh. Why would people here buy US made matzoh rather than Aviv?

I am reminded of the time I was in a supermarket and saw a woman buying matzoh, ham, and other items. I said to her that matzoh and ham is a stange combination. She said that she isn't Jewish. I imagined her going home and making a ham on matzoh sandwich!I wonder what percentage of matzoh sold in the US is eaten by non Jews?

Aviv has always been my favorite. I've been using it for years.
Maybe people aren't buying the more expensive imported brands or the shmurah.
They may also be using up the leftover matzo from last year. I know I always have some left over and it sits until the following passover when I throw it out. This year, I'll use it for matzo brie if its stale but otherwise edible.

3

 Mar 23, 2009 at 10:11 AM Anonymous Says:

Why is whole wheat matzoh often hard to find, and so much more expensive than matzoh that is not whole wheat? Why isn't whole wheat matzoh the norm? Why is matzoh so thin? Wasn't the original matzoh quite thick? Was matzoh alway so low in moisture content, or is the low moisture content to make it less perishable?

4

 Mar 23, 2009 at 10:57 AM Economy Says:

The economy effects every decision. Buying trends are less than usual and people are doubling up on potatos and carrots and less shmura matzohs. That is the way it goes...

5

 Mar 23, 2009 at 02:39 PM chremzel Says:

Reply to #3  
Anonymous Says:

Why is whole wheat matzoh often hard to find, and so much more expensive than matzoh that is not whole wheat? Why isn't whole wheat matzoh the norm? Why is matzoh so thin? Wasn't the original matzoh quite thick? Was matzoh alway so low in moisture content, or is the low moisture content to make it less perishable?

Because whole of anything always costing more than haf of sumpting. silly qvestion.

6

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