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Syosset, NY - Sale Of Shul Goes To Court

Published on: May 5, 2009 02:42 PM
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East Nassau Hebrew Congregation has not had an active minyan for several years. photo credit: Michael DatikashEast Nassau Hebrew Congregation has not had an active minyan for several years. photo credit: Michael Datikash

Syosset, NY - The long-running saga over the fate of the East Nassau Hebrew Congregation in Syosset seems now to be at a crossroads.

A controversial plan to sell the synagogue to a Korean church deserves judicial scrutiny, according to State Attorney General Andrew Cuomo.

In papers filed before State Supreme Court Justice Thomas Phelan in Mineola, Assistant Attorney General Dorothy Nese asked the judge to conduct a full evidentiary hearing if necessary before deciding whether to permit the sale.

At issue is which of two groups of residents are telling the truth when they claim to be the synagogue’s trustees.

A group that includes the congregation’s rabbi, Sol Appleman insists that there is no longer an active congregation and that there has not been a minyan there for several years. In court papers, Rabbi Appleman said he is seeking dissolution of the congregation so he can sell the synagogue and three homes it owns.

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The group seeking to block the sale, he said, wants to bring about “a hostile takeover” of the building, which he said his late parents bought and later donated to the congregation. Rabbi Appleman’s father, Morris, had been the Orthodox congregation’s spiritual leader for more than 40 years.

He charged also that Chabad-Lubavitch of Plainview is behind the group seeking to block the sale and that “their real goal is to obtain possession of East Nassau’s real property.”

Gerald Gross, the attorney for the objecting residents, claimed in court papers filed by an associate, Elliot Pasik, that Rabbi Appleman was “trying to play this court like a fiddle” in order to pull off “an elaborate scam.” He insisted that the board Rabbi Appleman said truly represents the synagogue is actually a “sham” because it is “populated by his family and friends who do not reside in the Syosset area.”

“Rabbi [Appleman] has, quite intentionally, driven this synagogue into the ground, closing it, looting its assets, and behaved like a neighborhood street bully, all in an effort to enrich himself with a $300,000 plus judgment,” Pasik wrote.

Rabbi Appleman said in an interview that he has arranged for the proceeds from the sale of the congregations’ properties to go to 25 different charities and yeshivas.

A bet din or Jewish religious court awarded Rabbi Appleman more than $290,000 in back pay that he said the congregation owed him. A court later affirmed that award in an uncontested proceeding that the objecting residents are now seeking to vacate.

In her papers to the court, Nese said she has been following this dispute for more than two years. At first it concerned allegations that the rabbi improperly leased the synagogue to an outside group and was planning to sell it. To do so or lease it for longer than five years would need her office’s approval.
Nese said she wrote to Rabbi Appleman to tell him of complaints about his “purported misuse or misappropriation of the synagogue property” and the way he was “conducting himself as the rabbi.”
She said also that she is still awaiting information from him that she requested a year ago and that the objecting residents had sought to argue their case before a bet din. When Rabbi Appleman declined, the religious court issued a ruling barring him from selling the congregation’s property.

Rabbi Appelbaum said the proceedings were holding up funds that were eagerly awaited by charitable beneficiaries.

Rabbi Appleman said three different developers want to buy the houses and that “a church wants to buy the synagogue indirectly.” He said the sale price is $2.5 million.

Rabbi Tuvia Teldon, executive director of Lubavitch of Long Island, said his organization is trying to see if there are other area residents interested in saving the congregation.

“They need to get more people on board to convince the court that there are enough people who want it to be a viable congregation,” he said. “We’re trying to help them get their shul back.”



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Read Comments (73)  —  Post Yours »

1

 May 05, 2009 at 01:52 PM Anonymous Says:

This reminds me of the Australian situation where the congregation wants to fire the rebbe to save money and survive....here the rebbe wants to "fire" the congregation (or what might be left of an olam that could revive the shul)

2

 May 05, 2009 at 02:03 PM Anonymous Says:

Rabbi Teldon is a true yiras shomayim. May HKB"H bentch him with hatzlacha to save the shul from going to corupt individuals.

3

 May 05, 2009 at 02:10 PM Anonymous Says:

Maybe Agudah will help "Rabbi" Appleman by filing an amicus brief!!

4

 May 05, 2009 at 02:49 PM Pashuteh Yid Says:

It was common knowledge that Rabbi Sol Appleman bought the property, and built the shul with his own money, and ran a successful and profitable Hebrew School and catering hall/catering business for many years from which he made his livelihood. I don't know what the hava amina is that outsiders can come along and try to take it from the family. Membership has dwindled, so let them sell the bldg and it should be the kid's yerusha or for them to donate as they see fit.

5

 May 05, 2009 at 02:52 PM Anonymous Says:

is this an orthodox shul, or conservative or reform? what alternative synagogues are in the local area?What are the synagogues expenses? How much revenue did it have last year? If the synagogue is operating at a large deficit and membership is small, then there are good reasons to consider closing it. More details are needed to make a reasonable judgement about this situation.

6

 May 05, 2009 at 02:40 PM Mentsh Says:

There hasn't been any activity in this building for several years. I work down the street and have never seen a soul in the building. It's very unfortunate; many synagogues on Long Island are closing. It would be nice to see this one open again.

7

 May 05, 2009 at 02:40 PM PMO Says:

I know the Teldon family well. They have been key players in advancing orthodoxy all over eastern Long Island and bringing MANY people back toward a life of Torah. B"H he is involved now... I have seen Tuvia Teldon make miracles happen on Long Island. He is VERY well respected by local government officials as he works WITH communities... not against them.... to build shuls all over Suffolk County. His wife opened a yeshiva for young children a number of years ago in East Northport, NY, near the Young Israel there (Chaim Bausk's shul). Nobody thought it would succeed, as a previous school had closed a few years prior. They have succeeded beautifully. Torah, genuine intelligence, and respect for the community are the winds in their sails and I have little doubt that they will be successful in obtaining this shul and re-building the community.

8

 May 05, 2009 at 03:44 PM Anonymous Says:

who really owns a shul? Since the property paid no taxes because it is exempt and the rabbi lived on the property without paying taxes, who really owns the shu?l do the congregants who paid dues so it kept running up to now? does the state own it because no taxes were paid? who decides where the sale proceeds are to go? does anyone know the law about this?

9

 May 05, 2009 at 04:16 PM More Sales to Come Says:

Just think about all the Conservative and Reform temples located in great locations throughout Long Island and the Northeast that will soon be closing. I bet there will be many Board of Trustee fights over who should get the money. The tax law states that 501(c)(3) tax exempt organizations must distribute their assets upon dissolution to other 501(c)(3) tax exempt organizations. As we see here, the Rabbi has a claim on back wages and I am certain other liabilities will be presented for payment. Since this transaction is under media scrutiny it will now have to be transacted correctly.

10

 May 05, 2009 at 06:16 PM Rabbi Sol Appleman Says:

Reply to #4  
Pashuteh Yid Says:

It was common knowledge that Rabbi Sol Appleman bought the property, and built the shul with his own money, and ran a successful and profitable Hebrew School and catering hall/catering business for many years from which he made his livelihood. I don't know what the hava amina is that outsiders can come along and try to take it from the family. Membership has dwindled, so let them sell the bldg and it should be the kid's yerusha or for them to donate as they see fit.

Thank you for your support. I'm glad someone knows the real story.

11

 May 05, 2009 at 06:15 PM Rabbi Sol Appleman Says:

Reply to #1  
Anonymous Says:

This reminds me of the Australian situation where the congregation wants to fire the rebbe to save money and survive....here the rebbe wants to "fire" the congregation (or what might be left of an olam that could revive the shul)

I'm the rabbi of the Shul in question. There is no "olam" there anymore. There are 30 paid up members who agreed to the sale. There are 5 people who oppose. 2 of the five had their house up for sale for almost 2 years. Another supposed "member" was the lawyer for the opposing group 2 years ago and he now claims to be a board member. One of this group is an intermarried Kohain. None of the 5 people in opposition has ever paid any kind of membership fee or even a donation to the Shul. Had they done so, maybe the we could have survived. I gave my life to the Shul. I placed a yeshiva there for three years. None of these purported members ever attempted to help keep it going. Now, when it's time to move on, they all of a sudden wake up because they smell there's money to be made. It's sickening that it had to come to this. Anyone interested in the list of mosdos who are to receive the money from the sale may contact me directly to see the side of the story that is not being reported.
I'm at rabbisa@gmail.com
Rabbi Sol Appleman

12

 May 05, 2009 at 06:29 PM Rabbi Sol Appleman Says:

Reply to #7  
PMO Says:

I know the Teldon family well. They have been key players in advancing orthodoxy all over eastern Long Island and bringing MANY people back toward a life of Torah. B"H he is involved now... I have seen Tuvia Teldon make miracles happen on Long Island. He is VERY well respected by local government officials as he works WITH communities... not against them.... to build shuls all over Suffolk County. His wife opened a yeshiva for young children a number of years ago in East Northport, NY, near the Young Israel there (Chaim Bausk's shul). Nobody thought it would succeed, as a previous school had closed a few years prior. They have succeeded beautifully. Torah, genuine intelligence, and respect for the community are the winds in their sails and I have little doubt that they will be successful in obtaining this shul and re-building the community.

I had no problem selling the Shul to the Chabad of Oyster Bay. In fact, in 2003, I personally contact Rabbi Shmuel Lipsycz of the Town of Oyster Bay Chabad and asked him if he was interested in the Shul. He answered that he was and we had a meeting. He offered $300,000. We turned him down. Besides the "offer" being insulting, the courts would never allow a sum paid for real property of a not for profit religious corp to deviate by more than 10%. Shortly after, The Torah Academy of Long Island signed a lease for 4 years. They tried to build up the school, but a flood and asbestos cleanup ended that dream. After they left in Aug. 2006, I tried to sell the Shul to YU, Chofetz Chaim, Touro and others. No one wanted it. People from The Chabad of OB - the same ones involved here - tried to stop any sale then. However, rather than come up with the fair market value of the building, they wanted to simply take it over by importing chasidim from Crown Heights. I called Tuvia Teldon in March 2007 to ask him to stop them from doing that. He told me that he doesn't get involved in internal disputes in a Shul. He called me before Pesach this year and informed me that he was now getting involved. So I guess he lied to me. Again, had Chabad offered a fair market value, they could have had it. However, I will not stand by and let them steal it. Some of the money will go to pay debts incurred. At least 3/4 of the money will go to institutions that my parents A"H supported their entire lives. Every day that goes by, these institutions are losing money. That is on the head of these 4 imposters, 1 lawyer and Rabbi Teldon.

13

 May 05, 2009 at 07:55 PM Anonymous Says:

Are there other synagogues in the area? If so, then closing the synagogue might be the best choice, especially if a large portion of the proceeds of the sale will be gives to shuls or yeshivas that are in need. If there aren't any other shuls in the area though, then closing it without giving people an alternative might be an issue.

14

 May 05, 2009 at 07:30 PM PMO Says:

Reply to #12  
Rabbi Sol Appleman Says:

I had no problem selling the Shul to the Chabad of Oyster Bay. In fact, in 2003, I personally contact Rabbi Shmuel Lipsycz of the Town of Oyster Bay Chabad and asked him if he was interested in the Shul. He answered that he was and we had a meeting. He offered $300,000. We turned him down. Besides the "offer" being insulting, the courts would never allow a sum paid for real property of a not for profit religious corp to deviate by more than 10%. Shortly after, The Torah Academy of Long Island signed a lease for 4 years. They tried to build up the school, but a flood and asbestos cleanup ended that dream. After they left in Aug. 2006, I tried to sell the Shul to YU, Chofetz Chaim, Touro and others. No one wanted it. People from The Chabad of OB - the same ones involved here - tried to stop any sale then. However, rather than come up with the fair market value of the building, they wanted to simply take it over by importing chasidim from Crown Heights. I called Tuvia Teldon in March 2007 to ask him to stop them from doing that. He told me that he doesn't get involved in internal disputes in a Shul. He called me before Pesach this year and informed me that he was now getting involved. So I guess he lied to me. Again, had Chabad offered a fair market value, they could have had it. However, I will not stand by and let them steal it. Some of the money will go to pay debts incurred. At least 3/4 of the money will go to institutions that my parents A"H supported their entire lives. Every day that goes by, these institutions are losing money. That is on the head of these 4 imposters, 1 lawyer and Rabbi Teldon.

This is the problem with rabbonim thinking they "own" the shul. This is a non-profit organization... it belongs to the community... The Rav should have no say in the business dealings of the shul.... or we end up here.... every time.

Rabbi Appleman... I'm sorry that you have watched your father's work go do down the tubes... and I am sorry that this shul was not what you hoped it would be. You should stand aside and let someone with the resources to rebuild the community step in. I am sure you can be personally compensated for your salary. The board should allow Chabad to come in and take over the 501c3. A shul should stand there... forever. Every community that falters can be rebuilt. If need be, sell off the houses and donate the proceeds to whatever charity you like. Perhaps Chabad can start a school as they have in East Northport (I could have told you that TALI would never have worked with the "rabbis" who were behind that place). They have the ability to start something new. There is nobody better to do that on Long Island than Tuvia Teldon. Sell him the building and then donate the money back to chabad to run the shul.

15

 May 05, 2009 at 08:25 PM Anonymous Says:

Go Rabbi Appleman! I am behind you one hundred percent. Do not let these imposters under any circumstances upset you. You have been the life of the shul for your entire life and without all of your and your parents hard work there would have never been any shul there in the first place. I cant fathom the fact that these imposters only offered you 300,000 dollars for that beautiful shul. What an INSULT and they should be ashamed of themselves. I am so sorry you have to go through this and deal with this situation when you are no where deserving of it. I just dont get how they can go through life life with out guilt and fear of facing Hakadosh Baruch Hu after 120. I hope they realize they may be able to fool people b'olam hazeh but they can not fool G-d.

16

 May 05, 2009 at 08:08 PM Some respect, please. Says:

Reply to #12  
Rabbi Sol Appleman Says:

I had no problem selling the Shul to the Chabad of Oyster Bay. In fact, in 2003, I personally contact Rabbi Shmuel Lipsycz of the Town of Oyster Bay Chabad and asked him if he was interested in the Shul. He answered that he was and we had a meeting. He offered $300,000. We turned him down. Besides the "offer" being insulting, the courts would never allow a sum paid for real property of a not for profit religious corp to deviate by more than 10%. Shortly after, The Torah Academy of Long Island signed a lease for 4 years. They tried to build up the school, but a flood and asbestos cleanup ended that dream. After they left in Aug. 2006, I tried to sell the Shul to YU, Chofetz Chaim, Touro and others. No one wanted it. People from The Chabad of OB - the same ones involved here - tried to stop any sale then. However, rather than come up with the fair market value of the building, they wanted to simply take it over by importing chasidim from Crown Heights. I called Tuvia Teldon in March 2007 to ask him to stop them from doing that. He told me that he doesn't get involved in internal disputes in a Shul. He called me before Pesach this year and informed me that he was now getting involved. So I guess he lied to me. Again, had Chabad offered a fair market value, they could have had it. However, I will not stand by and let them steal it. Some of the money will go to pay debts incurred. At least 3/4 of the money will go to institutions that my parents A"H supported their entire lives. Every day that goes by, these institutions are losing money. That is on the head of these 4 imposters, 1 lawyer and Rabbi Teldon.

Every story has two sides to it.

Rabbi Apleman, you have every right to state your case. But how dare you accuse Rabbi Teldon of being a liar. I myself have been touched by him and am currently frum thanks to him. I know many people who have been touched by him and his wife as well. He is the most honest and straightforward type of guy you can meet.

State your case, not your hatred.

17

 May 05, 2009 at 09:23 PM Pashuteh Yid Says:

Reply to #10  
Rabbi Sol Appleman Says:

Thank you for your support. I'm glad someone knows the real story.

Your welcome. BTW, I'm sorry for mixing up the first names. I meant to say that your father, Rabbi Morris Appleman A"H, started the shul years back.

18

 May 05, 2009 at 08:49 PM Anonymous Says:

I can see the hurt and pain the Rabbi must be feeling. I am horrified that he felt the need to vent on the web to many like myself who do not know all the details involving the shul and the sale. Loshon Hora about another Jew is unacceptable (especially since there is no gain for the other Rabbi). After reading Rabbi Applemans letter filled with hate, and loshon hora I wonder why he wouldn't agree to Bais Din? I am confused

19

 May 05, 2009 at 10:19 PM Anonymous Says:

Im flabbergasted!! 300.000 was an "insulting offer", but its ok to convert a shul into a church and justifying it by saying that the proceeds will go to Tzedaka!!!?!
Its unbelievable how $$ can blind people....
A shul is a mikdash me-at, kedusha eino zaz mimkomo! The mishna says how we shouldnt even cut the overgrown grass in an abandoned shul so that people will be distraught at the churbon and do everything possible to rebuild it!
Maybe one should look at R Wasserman as an example. In LA he built a nice Yeshiva building but than didnt have enough people or talmidim to keep it up, so he gave it over to the chabad yeshiva with the condition that the building will be kept as a yeshiva, and that his father name will stay on it.
Its 30 years now that the succesful and ever expanding Yeshiva Ohr Elchonon Chabad is functioning.
The best way to honor you father, Rabbi Sol , is to have others rebuild the community on the condition that the building stays a shul/school and your fathers name is placed on the building.

20

 May 05, 2009 at 10:08 PM Doc Says:

So the issue is that Chabad offered a small amount and the Korean church offered more money.
How can you sell it to a church!
The other 3 properties can be sold to whomever- it doesn't look like anyone contests that.
Rabbi Applebaum- you will get your $300,000 in back wages-but the ability to give more proceeds to charity is not a reason to sell to a church!
(Which is also a complicated halachic problem.)

21

 May 06, 2009 at 04:06 AM Bochur Says:

To see a "Rabbi" write such hatred brings tears to my eyes, if such people call themselves leaders of our generation are we even worthy to exist?
Every story has two sides and the bashing going on here is against Halocha. LH is NEVER allowed and I am appaulded to see the Rabbi having no busha and rattling off like he is.

The fact the Shul is going to be a Church is not a simple matter mitzad Halocha, it seems all they care about is $ which is a shame.

Every machlokes for the sake of shamayim will last, those not will not. May Hashem bless those who seek good and helping others and not those who seek their own benefit. Hashem is the true judge and will reward the honest party whoever it is.


22

 May 06, 2009 at 02:48 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #15  
Anonymous Says:

Go Rabbi Appleman! I am behind you one hundred percent. Do not let these imposters under any circumstances upset you. You have been the life of the shul for your entire life and without all of your and your parents hard work there would have never been any shul there in the first place. I cant fathom the fact that these imposters only offered you 300,000 dollars for that beautiful shul. What an INSULT and they should be ashamed of themselves. I am so sorry you have to go through this and deal with this situation when you are no where deserving of it. I just dont get how they can go through life life with out guilt and fear of facing Hakadosh Baruch Hu after 120. I hope they realize they may be able to fool people b'olam hazeh but they can not fool G-d.

1. Appleman created is the one who created an imposter board that was not duly elected pursuant to any body of law in respect to an NPO or religious corp. How can people who object to an illegal act in a democratic society in a proper forum of law be "imposters"?
2. "[Sol has] been the life of the shul for [his] entire life..." Perhaps the online expression LOL would be an approriate response to that fallacious statement (he has not lived in syosset for a number of years now). However, I do give credence to that statement only in the early years and when his father was still alive. In his latter years and his departure to the five towns, Solly was the reason that place became empty becuase of his apathetic attitude; lack of outreach to new members; disrespect towards existing longtime members. This is not an exhaustive list.
3. His parents hard work - Sol is disgracing that by selling it to a church, even if secular law permits it, under Jewish law the mitigating circumstances to allow such a such a sale do not exist in a region that has over 30,000 Jews. I would like to know how there are no reasonable JEWISH alternatives when we live in a state that has millions of Jews?
4. That "beautiful shul" will now be a church, thus reneging his father's vision to have a shul in that area.
5. How will sol go through life knowing he sold his father and mother's shul to a church, misapproriated funds, used fraudulent means to induce the sale. Shouldn't that invoke the fear of G-d as an orthodox Jew? Any orthodox Jew should be disturbed by this act; even from a secular standpoint this raises a public policy issue, community members should express concern when a clergyman pirates the coffers of a Not for profit religious organization under such a guise.

I do not mean any disrespect to the church that is involved in this, I hope they know that if they do get the Shul, it was not transferred with clean hands, which would not be reflective of the common morals and religious beliefs espoused by Judeo-Christian doctrines.

23

 May 06, 2009 at 02:17 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #4  
Pashuteh Yid Says:

It was common knowledge that Rabbi Sol Appleman bought the property, and built the shul with his own money, and ran a successful and profitable Hebrew School and catering hall/catering business for many years from which he made his livelihood. I don't know what the hava amina is that outsiders can come along and try to take it from the family. Membership has dwindled, so let them sell the bldg and it should be the kid's yerusha or for them to donate as they see fit.

How could it be his property when there is a legal chrater indicating it is incorporated as a NPO/Religious organization under NYS law. Common knowledge does not reflect legal realities. Also, Appleman would need to go through the courts, even if no one objected. There be no issue if it was in fact personal property. Teyovtah!!

24

 May 06, 2009 at 01:52 AM Anonymous Says:

Orthodx schules all over New York City ave been sold to churches. There may be halachic issues, but they have built dealt wiht.

A simple little ugly fact.All over the country some Chabad shluchim play dirtygames to advance thier cause. look at the current casein Short Hills NJ. The Chabad Rabbi specificlaly said there are no services in his home to the village adminastrator and that his home is not a schule.And in Jewish newspapers he is advertising minyanim in his home.

The Applemans have a long hinirable history on Long Island.

25

 May 06, 2009 at 06:15 AM Pashuteh Yid Says:

Reply to #23  
Anonymous Says:

How could it be his property when there is a legal chrater indicating it is incorporated as a NPO/Religious organization under NYS law. Common knowledge does not reflect legal realities. Also, Appleman would need to go through the courts, even if no one objected. There be no issue if it was in fact personal property. Teyovtah!!

I do not kow all the pratim. But bmishkal rishon we have a clear morei kama who is the father, Rabbi Morris Appleman. Now, if we have a dispute over whether or not he donated it to a board, or as to which board is the legitimate authority, then uki chad l'vahadi chad, v'uki mamonah bchezkas marei.

We all agree that it would be much better for it to remain a shul. But let the interested parties give fair market value. If that value is 2.5 million, then at least offer something reasonable. the offer of 10% of fair market value does not seem reasonable.

I really don't know much more about this issue, in general, so will probably not post further on this matter.

26

 May 06, 2009 at 06:11 AM Rabbi Sol Appleman Says:

Reply to #16  
Some respect, please. Says:

Every story has two sides to it.

Rabbi Apleman, you have every right to state your case. But how dare you accuse Rabbi Teldon of being a liar. I myself have been touched by him and am currently frum thanks to him. I know many people who have been touched by him and his wife as well. He is the most honest and straightforward type of guy you can meet.

State your case, not your hatred.

Reply to PMO #16:
For the record - I loved Rabbi Teldon from the moment I met him and his lovely wife, Chaya, more than 30 years ago. I know he has done tremendous things in the Jewish community for so many years. We have both given our lives for Torah and our fellow Jews. All I did was to state the facts. Ask Rabbi Teldon himself if what I wrote was true or not. I and my Shul have our derech to Hashem, and he has his. Shivim panim. May Rabbi Teldon and his family continue to help Klall Yisrael ad maya v'esrim.
I'm sorry if it sounded like I hate anyone in any of my previous posts. I've re-read them and I'm not sure how you got the impression that I hate anyone. I just wrote the history (very briefly) of what has been going on in an attempt to fill in the missing pieces of the article.
We were doing outreach long before Chabad came to the area. There are countless Jews in this country and in Israel who have been learning, observing and raising Jewish families because of our work. Ironically, as I write this, I have in one of my classes now a child whose father I taught almost 30 years ago in my Hebrew School.
However, this dispute is not Rabbi Teldon's. Nor is it any of the business of the purported "board" or "members" the paper talks about. The duly elected Board of Directors of East Nassau Hebrew Cong., Inc. decided on dissolution and many worthy institutions here and in Israel are waiting to benefit from the funds that will be generated from this Shul. These mosdos were all the type of which my parents a"h supported, and the money will be given in their memory.
There are currently 5 Orthodox Shuls within a 2 mile radius of my Shul. The Jewish community there cannot support all of them. The numbers just do not add up. No one is sadder than me and my family to have to do this. We have tried for almost 8 years to find a Jewish institution willing to buy the property at fair-market value and nobody wants to. This was our last, but only choice.

27

 May 06, 2009 at 06:20 AM Rabbi Sol Appleman Says:

Reply to #22  
Anonymous Says:

1. Appleman created is the one who created an imposter board that was not duly elected pursuant to any body of law in respect to an NPO or religious corp. How can people who object to an illegal act in a democratic society in a proper forum of law be "imposters"?
2. "[Sol has] been the life of the shul for [his] entire life..." Perhaps the online expression LOL would be an approriate response to that fallacious statement (he has not lived in syosset for a number of years now). However, I do give credence to that statement only in the early years and when his father was still alive. In his latter years and his departure to the five towns, Solly was the reason that place became empty becuase of his apathetic attitude; lack of outreach to new members; disrespect towards existing longtime members. This is not an exhaustive list.
3. His parents hard work - Sol is disgracing that by selling it to a church, even if secular law permits it, under Jewish law the mitigating circumstances to allow such a such a sale do not exist in a region that has over 30,000 Jews. I would like to know how there are no reasonable JEWISH alternatives when we live in a state that has millions of Jews?
4. That "beautiful shul" will now be a church, thus reneging his father's vision to have a shul in that area.
5. How will sol go through life knowing he sold his father and mother's shul to a church, misapproriated funds, used fraudulent means to induce the sale. Shouldn't that invoke the fear of G-d as an orthodox Jew? Any orthodox Jew should be disturbed by this act; even from a secular standpoint this raises a public policy issue, community members should express concern when a clergyman pirates the coffers of a Not for profit religious organization under such a guise.

I do not mean any disrespect to the church that is involved in this, I hope they know that if they do get the Shul, it was not transferred with clean hands, which would not be reflective of the common morals and religious beliefs espoused by Judeo-Christian doctrines.

Reply to 22:
Wow! Talk about hate!

28

 May 06, 2009 at 06:21 AM Rabbi Sol Appleman Says:

Reply to #22  
Anonymous Says:

1. Appleman created is the one who created an imposter board that was not duly elected pursuant to any body of law in respect to an NPO or religious corp. How can people who object to an illegal act in a democratic society in a proper forum of law be "imposters"?
2. "[Sol has] been the life of the shul for [his] entire life..." Perhaps the online expression LOL would be an approriate response to that fallacious statement (he has not lived in syosset for a number of years now). However, I do give credence to that statement only in the early years and when his father was still alive. In his latter years and his departure to the five towns, Solly was the reason that place became empty becuase of his apathetic attitude; lack of outreach to new members; disrespect towards existing longtime members. This is not an exhaustive list.
3. His parents hard work - Sol is disgracing that by selling it to a church, even if secular law permits it, under Jewish law the mitigating circumstances to allow such a such a sale do not exist in a region that has over 30,000 Jews. I would like to know how there are no reasonable JEWISH alternatives when we live in a state that has millions of Jews?
4. That "beautiful shul" will now be a church, thus reneging his father's vision to have a shul in that area.
5. How will sol go through life knowing he sold his father and mother's shul to a church, misapproriated funds, used fraudulent means to induce the sale. Shouldn't that invoke the fear of G-d as an orthodox Jew? Any orthodox Jew should be disturbed by this act; even from a secular standpoint this raises a public policy issue, community members should express concern when a clergyman pirates the coffers of a Not for profit religious organization under such a guise.

I do not mean any disrespect to the church that is involved in this, I hope they know that if they do get the Shul, it was not transferred with clean hands, which would not be reflective of the common morals and religious beliefs espoused by Judeo-Christian doctrines.

Solly? That's real respectful. This is what we have to deal with.

29

 May 06, 2009 at 07:13 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #26  
Rabbi Sol Appleman Says:

Reply to PMO #16:
For the record - I loved Rabbi Teldon from the moment I met him and his lovely wife, Chaya, more than 30 years ago. I know he has done tremendous things in the Jewish community for so many years. We have both given our lives for Torah and our fellow Jews. All I did was to state the facts. Ask Rabbi Teldon himself if what I wrote was true or not. I and my Shul have our derech to Hashem, and he has his. Shivim panim. May Rabbi Teldon and his family continue to help Klall Yisrael ad maya v'esrim.
I'm sorry if it sounded like I hate anyone in any of my previous posts. I've re-read them and I'm not sure how you got the impression that I hate anyone. I just wrote the history (very briefly) of what has been going on in an attempt to fill in the missing pieces of the article.
We were doing outreach long before Chabad came to the area. There are countless Jews in this country and in Israel who have been learning, observing and raising Jewish families because of our work. Ironically, as I write this, I have in one of my classes now a child whose father I taught almost 30 years ago in my Hebrew School.
However, this dispute is not Rabbi Teldon's. Nor is it any of the business of the purported "board" or "members" the paper talks about. The duly elected Board of Directors of East Nassau Hebrew Cong., Inc. decided on dissolution and many worthy institutions here and in Israel are waiting to benefit from the funds that will be generated from this Shul. These mosdos were all the type of which my parents a"h supported, and the money will be given in their memory.
There are currently 5 Orthodox Shuls within a 2 mile radius of my Shul. The Jewish community there cannot support all of them. The numbers just do not add up. No one is sadder than me and my family to have to do this. We have tried for almost 8 years to find a Jewish institution willing to buy the property at fair-market value and nobody wants to. This was our last, but only choice.

Did your lawyer advise you that what you said previously about Rabbi Teldon was scurrilous? This post sounds like attempted damage control to me.

I'm not as au fait on the inyan of selling a Shul to a church as I should be (perhaps someone can clearly state the Halacha for clarification), but isn't it asser to sell to a place of Avodah Zorah? Wouldn't a Korean church come under that umbrella? Or is it a Christian congregation?

Regardless, if Rabbi Appelbaum really cared about Jewish life in the neighborhood he would do anything rather than sell to a church. I know of a girls' school that wanted to move out to LI but couldn't find a property. If I know of something, surely others do? Did Rabbi Appelbaum publicly appeal in the frum veldt for a buyer?

30

 May 06, 2009 at 08:35 AM a simple man Says:

a fundamental question arises here

is a shul or any other mosad the property of the "board" or the people if the neighborhhod changeswho gets it.

does the "board" have a right to close a shul and then say there is no activity there so we need to sell it. or do they have to give it over to others that live there ifthey want to make a go at it. it is momoin hekdash not a personal fortune that people can sell as they see fit...

why should anyone have to pay for it even one penny .... if people living there want a shul they should get it for free (or at least the right to use and maitain it and then see if they do so for a number of years they should own it) why should chabad or anyone have to pay for a "public" thing they do not need to rent it ....

this is the problem today with "rabbis " "boards" they think these institutions are their private rtirement account. if the building belongs to a congergation then let the congergation use it. and who decides who is the congergation ?.....

the people that want to use it

that is why when our family wrote a sefer torah in my parents memory we were told by the rabbi that the family should "own" and keep it in a shul for their use. and not "give" it to a shul because then whi knows what might happen with the torahs ..

what happened here with all the torahs ? were they "dontaed" to other shuls for a donation or some money on the side

hahsem yeracheim on us all trying to make money on tehse things thinking that these are personnel property ... we need to learn the haluchois of doating to the beis hamikdash. so hashem should bring goel tzedek..

31

 May 06, 2009 at 09:05 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #25  
Pashuteh Yid Says:

I do not kow all the pratim. But bmishkal rishon we have a clear morei kama who is the father, Rabbi Morris Appleman. Now, if we have a dispute over whether or not he donated it to a board, or as to which board is the legitimate authority, then uki chad l'vahadi chad, v'uki mamonah bchezkas marei.

We all agree that it would be much better for it to remain a shul. But let the interested parties give fair market value. If that value is 2.5 million, then at least offer something reasonable. the offer of 10% of fair market value does not seem reasonable.

I really don't know much more about this issue, in general, so will probably not post further on this matter.

""We all agree that it would be much better for it to remain a shul. But let the interested parties give fair market value. If that value is 2.5 million, then at least offer something reasonable. the offer of 10% of fair market value does not seem reasonable."

Chabad is in essence saying that if the bulk of the shul's assets are to be given to Jewish religious organizations, then why not just donate the building Chabad, since Chabad is a deserving organization. I guess the $300,000 figure is just to be able to pay the back pay owed to the rabbi. If Chabad can prove that they would make adequate use of the building, and it is also established that if the shul is sold to a church there would be enough people in the area without a local minyan, then perhaps letting Chabad have the building is the right thing to do. If however there are other synagogues close enough, and Chabad really doesn't have a great need for the property, then perhaps a sale to the church, and distributing most of the proceeds to to needy yeshivas and shuls makes sense.

32

 May 06, 2009 at 09:44 AM Pashuteh Yid Says:

Reply to #30  
a simple man Says:

a fundamental question arises here

is a shul or any other mosad the property of the "board" or the people if the neighborhhod changeswho gets it.

does the "board" have a right to close a shul and then say there is no activity there so we need to sell it. or do they have to give it over to others that live there ifthey want to make a go at it. it is momoin hekdash not a personal fortune that people can sell as they see fit...

why should anyone have to pay for it even one penny .... if people living there want a shul they should get it for free (or at least the right to use and maitain it and then see if they do so for a number of years they should own it) why should chabad or anyone have to pay for a "public" thing they do not need to rent it ....

this is the problem today with "rabbis " "boards" they think these institutions are their private rtirement account. if the building belongs to a congergation then let the congergation use it. and who decides who is the congergation ?.....

the people that want to use it

that is why when our family wrote a sefer torah in my parents memory we were told by the rabbi that the family should "own" and keep it in a shul for their use. and not "give" it to a shul because then whi knows what might happen with the torahs ..

what happened here with all the torahs ? were they "dontaed" to other shuls for a donation or some money on the side

hahsem yeracheim on us all trying to make money on tehse things thinking that these are personnel property ... we need to learn the haluchois of doating to the beis hamikdash. so hashem should bring goel tzedek..

Do you get your lulav and esrog for free? Your shmurah matza? Your child's Yeshiva tuition? A mitzvah is more choshuv when it is paid for, as it shows dedication on the part of the performer. Rabban Gamliel paid a 1000 dollars for an esrog.

In addition, your own family decided to keep the Torah rather than donate it for free.

We would all like to keep it as shul, but shuls don't grow on trees. If the community didn't support it under Rabbi Sol Appleman's tenure, and are unwilling to pay for it now, then it doesn't seem that the community really does want a shul.

BTW, demographics change, unfortunately, and nearby in Hicksville there is another beautiful Orthodox shul, Shaarei Zedek, that is struggling to get a minyan on Shabbos, and only meets once a month. The Jewish Heritage Center and others are valiantly struggling to help out and keep it going.

I am all for keeping it a shul. Maybe a compromise could be worked out that whatever portion the Appleman family would get were it sold to the Korean Church, could be given to them by Chabad and keep it a shul. But it was the Appleman's family personal property for many years, and can't be taken away from them for nothing.

33

 May 06, 2009 at 10:39 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #26  
Rabbi Sol Appleman Says:

Reply to PMO #16:
For the record - I loved Rabbi Teldon from the moment I met him and his lovely wife, Chaya, more than 30 years ago. I know he has done tremendous things in the Jewish community for so many years. We have both given our lives for Torah and our fellow Jews. All I did was to state the facts. Ask Rabbi Teldon himself if what I wrote was true or not. I and my Shul have our derech to Hashem, and he has his. Shivim panim. May Rabbi Teldon and his family continue to help Klall Yisrael ad maya v'esrim.
I'm sorry if it sounded like I hate anyone in any of my previous posts. I've re-read them and I'm not sure how you got the impression that I hate anyone. I just wrote the history (very briefly) of what has been going on in an attempt to fill in the missing pieces of the article.
We were doing outreach long before Chabad came to the area. There are countless Jews in this country and in Israel who have been learning, observing and raising Jewish families because of our work. Ironically, as I write this, I have in one of my classes now a child whose father I taught almost 30 years ago in my Hebrew School.
However, this dispute is not Rabbi Teldon's. Nor is it any of the business of the purported "board" or "members" the paper talks about. The duly elected Board of Directors of East Nassau Hebrew Cong., Inc. decided on dissolution and many worthy institutions here and in Israel are waiting to benefit from the funds that will be generated from this Shul. These mosdos were all the type of which my parents a"h supported, and the money will be given in their memory.
There are currently 5 Orthodox Shuls within a 2 mile radius of my Shul. The Jewish community there cannot support all of them. The numbers just do not add up. No one is sadder than me and my family to have to do this. We have tried for almost 8 years to find a Jewish institution willing to buy the property at fair-market value and nobody wants to. This was our last, but only choice.

The beautiful sentiments expressed by Rabbi Appleman should be read by all the Know Nothings & Leydigeyers making false accusations at the Rabbi,It is sad that Chabad by these kind of actions earns itself a negative reputation,despite the good work that it does.

34

 May 06, 2009 at 11:09 AM a simple man Says:

Reply to #32  
Pashuteh Yid Says:

Do you get your lulav and esrog for free? Your shmurah matza? Your child's Yeshiva tuition? A mitzvah is more choshuv when it is paid for, as it shows dedication on the part of the performer. Rabban Gamliel paid a 1000 dollars for an esrog.

In addition, your own family decided to keep the Torah rather than donate it for free.

We would all like to keep it as shul, but shuls don't grow on trees. If the community didn't support it under Rabbi Sol Appleman's tenure, and are unwilling to pay for it now, then it doesn't seem that the community really does want a shul.

BTW, demographics change, unfortunately, and nearby in Hicksville there is another beautiful Orthodox shul, Shaarei Zedek, that is struggling to get a minyan on Shabbos, and only meets once a month. The Jewish Heritage Center and others are valiantly struggling to help out and keep it going.

I am all for keeping it a shul. Maybe a compromise could be worked out that whatever portion the Appleman family would get were it sold to the Korean Church, could be given to them by Chabad and keep it a shul. But it was the Appleman's family personal property for many years, and can't be taken away from them for nothing.

an esrog and a lulav i pay for and it is mine and the matzah i eat so..

when i donate to a "mikdash" like a shul a scholl etc that is different

and since the proerty is in a congergation name it does not belong to them personnaly, and i am sure many others donated to them over the years also

as far as i can see it is hekdash public money a public building...

why do they not try and work out a deal with these people to let them use it a sa shul if it works it stay in hekdash if not they will own it, give them a 5 year free lease to use it

35

 May 06, 2009 at 11:03 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #25  
Pashuteh Yid Says:

I do not kow all the pratim. But bmishkal rishon we have a clear morei kama who is the father, Rabbi Morris Appleman. Now, if we have a dispute over whether or not he donated it to a board, or as to which board is the legitimate authority, then uki chad l'vahadi chad, v'uki mamonah bchezkas marei.

We all agree that it would be much better for it to remain a shul. But let the interested parties give fair market value. If that value is 2.5 million, then at least offer something reasonable. the offer of 10% of fair market value does not seem reasonable.

I really don't know much more about this issue, in general, so will probably not post further on this matter.

"We all agree that it would be much better for it to remain a shul. But let the interested parties give fair market value. If that value is 2.5 million, then at least offer something reasonable. the offer of 10% of fair market value does not seem reasonable."

You are assuming that the local Chabad has enough money to be able to pay 2.5 million. Keep in mind that it isn't just being able to afford the purchase price, but also being able to afford the building's expenses. The real issue is how well the Chabad could use the space, and what the local Chabad would provide to the community in the space(would there be weekday minyans for shachris, mincha and maariv, as well as shabbos minyons). If there is no other shul within reasonable walking distance for a large enough number of people, then selling it to a church without providing an alternative local shul for people would clearly be the wrong thing to do(could there be some other althernatives? ). Perhaps some might say that more publicity is needed, so that someone will donate $2.5 million + for Chabad to buy the building at full market value plus pay for at least some of the building's expenses.

36

 May 06, 2009 at 11:40 AM PMO Says:

Reply to #32  
Pashuteh Yid Says:

Do you get your lulav and esrog for free? Your shmurah matza? Your child's Yeshiva tuition? A mitzvah is more choshuv when it is paid for, as it shows dedication on the part of the performer. Rabban Gamliel paid a 1000 dollars for an esrog.

In addition, your own family decided to keep the Torah rather than donate it for free.

We would all like to keep it as shul, but shuls don't grow on trees. If the community didn't support it under Rabbi Sol Appleman's tenure, and are unwilling to pay for it now, then it doesn't seem that the community really does want a shul.

BTW, demographics change, unfortunately, and nearby in Hicksville there is another beautiful Orthodox shul, Shaarei Zedek, that is struggling to get a minyan on Shabbos, and only meets once a month. The Jewish Heritage Center and others are valiantly struggling to help out and keep it going.

I am all for keeping it a shul. Maybe a compromise could be worked out that whatever portion the Appleman family would get were it sold to the Korean Church, could be given to them by Chabad and keep it a shul. But it was the Appleman's family personal property for many years, and can't be taken away from them for nothing.

You have your facts wrong. Rabbi Appleman does not OWN the properties. The non-profit organization (East Nassau Hebrew Congregation) owns the property.

37

 May 06, 2009 at 03:39 PM Anonymous Says:

Even if a non-profit organization owns the shul, they would not accept an offer of 300,000 dollars, and Rabbi appleman wants to give the money from the shul to charity. I do not see what the question is here there is no community there that means that there is not a large enough number of people in order to keep the shul a shul that is why he wants to sell it. If Chabad wanted to buy it , like Rabbi Appleman said, he would be fine with it but to offer 300,000 dollars is an insult and I am sure they can come up with ways to raise money to buy the shul. To just take Rabbi Appleman to court instead of finding ways to raise money in order to buy the shul, shows that they do not sincerely care about having the shul, but just want to getr property for (basicully) free.

38

 May 06, 2009 at 04:18 PM PMO Says:

Reply to #37  
Anonymous Says:

Even if a non-profit organization owns the shul, they would not accept an offer of 300,000 dollars, and Rabbi appleman wants to give the money from the shul to charity. I do not see what the question is here there is no community there that means that there is not a large enough number of people in order to keep the shul a shul that is why he wants to sell it. If Chabad wanted to buy it , like Rabbi Appleman said, he would be fine with it but to offer 300,000 dollars is an insult and I am sure they can come up with ways to raise money to buy the shul. To just take Rabbi Appleman to court instead of finding ways to raise money in order to buy the shul, shows that they do not sincerely care about having the shul, but just want to getr property for (basicully) free.

You say THEY want to get the property. Who is THEY? The shul belongs to the community. While more and more unaffiliated yidden have moved into the area, it still has a HUGE Jewish population. Why should this community lose out like this?

39

 May 06, 2009 at 07:08 PM East Nassau Congregant and Documented Board Member Says:

Reply to #12  
Rabbi Sol Appleman Says:

I had no problem selling the Shul to the Chabad of Oyster Bay. In fact, in 2003, I personally contact Rabbi Shmuel Lipsycz of the Town of Oyster Bay Chabad and asked him if he was interested in the Shul. He answered that he was and we had a meeting. He offered $300,000. We turned him down. Besides the "offer" being insulting, the courts would never allow a sum paid for real property of a not for profit religious corp to deviate by more than 10%. Shortly after, The Torah Academy of Long Island signed a lease for 4 years. They tried to build up the school, but a flood and asbestos cleanup ended that dream. After they left in Aug. 2006, I tried to sell the Shul to YU, Chofetz Chaim, Touro and others. No one wanted it. People from The Chabad of OB - the same ones involved here - tried to stop any sale then. However, rather than come up with the fair market value of the building, they wanted to simply take it over by importing chasidim from Crown Heights. I called Tuvia Teldon in March 2007 to ask him to stop them from doing that. He told me that he doesn't get involved in internal disputes in a Shul. He called me before Pesach this year and informed me that he was now getting involved. So I guess he lied to me. Again, had Chabad offered a fair market value, they could have had it. However, I will not stand by and let them steal it. Some of the money will go to pay debts incurred. At least 3/4 of the money will go to institutions that my parents A"H supported their entire lives. Every day that goes by, these institutions are losing money. That is on the head of these 4 imposters, 1 lawyer and Rabbi Teldon.

Rabbi Teldon out of the generosity of his spirit and concern for our community that a Shul would be sold to a Missionary Church, has only provided our congregants with guidance in building support for our efforts to preserve ENHC as a Jewsih Shul. There are no dark or machiavelian meanings to his or Chabad's advice. It is our prayer to Hashem daily, that all Jews will come together and find a common solution that will preserve the Shul. There is a large and viable Jewish community here that will surely respond to dynamic and hard working efforts to continue Yidishkeit at ENHC. I urge everyone to be positive, work together as Jews and don't give up to negative self-defeating behavior. SHALOM!

40

 May 06, 2009 at 06:49 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #26  
Rabbi Sol Appleman Says:

Reply to PMO #16:
For the record - I loved Rabbi Teldon from the moment I met him and his lovely wife, Chaya, more than 30 years ago. I know he has done tremendous things in the Jewish community for so many years. We have both given our lives for Torah and our fellow Jews. All I did was to state the facts. Ask Rabbi Teldon himself if what I wrote was true or not. I and my Shul have our derech to Hashem, and he has his. Shivim panim. May Rabbi Teldon and his family continue to help Klall Yisrael ad maya v'esrim.
I'm sorry if it sounded like I hate anyone in any of my previous posts. I've re-read them and I'm not sure how you got the impression that I hate anyone. I just wrote the history (very briefly) of what has been going on in an attempt to fill in the missing pieces of the article.
We were doing outreach long before Chabad came to the area. There are countless Jews in this country and in Israel who have been learning, observing and raising Jewish families because of our work. Ironically, as I write this, I have in one of my classes now a child whose father I taught almost 30 years ago in my Hebrew School.
However, this dispute is not Rabbi Teldon's. Nor is it any of the business of the purported "board" or "members" the paper talks about. The duly elected Board of Directors of East Nassau Hebrew Cong., Inc. decided on dissolution and many worthy institutions here and in Israel are waiting to benefit from the funds that will be generated from this Shul. These mosdos were all the type of which my parents a"h supported, and the money will be given in their memory.
There are currently 5 Orthodox Shuls within a 2 mile radius of my Shul. The Jewish community there cannot support all of them. The numbers just do not add up. No one is sadder than me and my family to have to do this. We have tried for almost 8 years to find a Jewish institution willing to buy the property at fair-market value and nobody wants to. This was our last, but only choice.

"There are currently 5 Orthodox Shuls within a 2 mile radius of my Shul. "

I guess the question is how many who use the shul live more than 10 blocks away from another orthodox shul? How many live more than 20 blocks away from another orthodox shul? Two miles(40 blocks) seems like a very long distance to walk to shul in very cold or very hot weather. The other question is if there are too many orthodox synagogues in the area, is this the one that makes the most sense to close, or would one of the others be a better choice? I guess it depends on how the orthodox population is distributed within the area, how these synagogues have managed financially(ie. which has the largest deficit) what the expenses are for each shul and what the capacity is for each, as well as what the alternative use or sales value for each could be.

41

 May 06, 2009 at 07:58 PM PMO Says:

Reply to #40  
Anonymous Says:

"There are currently 5 Orthodox Shuls within a 2 mile radius of my Shul. "

I guess the question is how many who use the shul live more than 10 blocks away from another orthodox shul? How many live more than 20 blocks away from another orthodox shul? Two miles(40 blocks) seems like a very long distance to walk to shul in very cold or very hot weather. The other question is if there are too many orthodox synagogues in the area, is this the one that makes the most sense to close, or would one of the others be a better choice? I guess it depends on how the orthodox population is distributed within the area, how these synagogues have managed financially(ie. which has the largest deficit) what the expenses are for each shul and what the capacity is for each, as well as what the alternative use or sales value for each could be.

You make very valid points.

However, on Long Island, shuls are also built for the purpose of kiruv. Many fo those who daven in these shuls are not frum, but on the way there. There is no reason why this shul should not be a beacon to this community. The community is not gone... the shul ran out of money. Chabad has the resources to bring it back. To just let it go to a group of missionaries is a disgrace.

42

 May 06, 2009 at 08:39 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #41  
PMO Says:

You make very valid points.

However, on Long Island, shuls are also built for the purpose of kiruv. Many fo those who daven in these shuls are not frum, but on the way there. There is no reason why this shul should not be a beacon to this community. The community is not gone... the shul ran out of money. Chabad has the resources to bring it back. To just let it go to a group of missionaries is a disgrace.

“ You make very valid points.

However, on Long Island, shuls are also built for the purpose of kiruv. Many fo those who daven in these shuls are not frum, but on the way there. There is no reason why this shul should not be a beacon to this community. The community is not gone... the shul ran out of money. Chabad has the resources to bring it back. To just let it go to a group of missionaries is a disgrace.”

I am trying to read between the lines here. I am assuming that this shul is probably running at a large deficit, and that other shuls in the area might also be running at a large deficit. Is this shul much different than the others in the area? Is it much larger, much newer? Worth more from a real estate vantage point? Running a much larger deficit than the others? Perhaps if a few shuls in the area are running a large deficit, then a coordinated plan should be worked out by a beit din to decide which one would be best to close. One approach might be to address the points I made in my last post, then get mapping software and map the addresses of the combined membership list for the 5 shuls to help establish geographically which to close. I am assuming that all the shuls in the area have excess capacity, although some might have more excess capacity than others. Closing one shul will bring more revenue to the others, as the members of the shul being closed will join other shuls, so one shouldn't just view this one shul in isolation, but what the situation is in the other shuls in the area. The goal should be efficiency and sustainability. What is the demographic shift in the area? Are the orthodox on average leaving the area and being replaced by those who are conservative, reform, or not Jewish, or is synagogue membership dropping since people are suffering economic hardship and can't afford it?

This seems very much like a business school case, where a company has many stores in an area, then business declines, and they must decide which if any of the stores to close. The unique constraint here is that how the population is distributed geographically compared to where the shuls are is so important, since people need to be able to comfortably walk to shul for shabbat and yom tov..

43

 May 06, 2009 at 09:59 PM Rabbi Sol Appleman Says:

Just wanted to share a d'var Torah from the Daf Yomi from a few days ago. Shmuel switched the statements of the Tanna Kamma and R' Meir, and taught the Mishnah as follows: (In the case of a wagon being pulled by 2 animals of different species ie a donkey and an ox) the Sages exempt the one sitting in the wagon (from makos) so you can learn from this that someone riding alone in a wagon - even if there is no leader leading the wagon - the rider does not acquire the wagon. Surely, if there is a leader, the rider cannot acquire the wagon (the leader does). So apparently, according to Shmuel, it is the leader who acquires as opposed to the rider just sitting in the shul. Er, I mean the wagon. Just sayin'
BTW, does it make any sense to anyone out there that 3 or 4 individuals should be allowed to hold a shul ransom thus preventing thousands of Jews from benefiting from the proceeds? We are talking about the greater good for the greater Jewish community. Now take into account that the 3 or 4 individuals are not even members of the shul! It's chutzpah of the highest order.

44

 May 06, 2009 at 10:45 PM Anonymous Says:

I guess the idea is to leave time for all the alternatives to be considered, and not just make a quick decision that might not be the best possible choice. To figure out what is really best for the community, many factors need to be considered, such as those broght up in the past few posts. Perhaps those who are objecting feel that enough research hasn't been done to decide what is best.

45

 May 06, 2009 at 10:35 PM Frum yid Says:

Reply to #19  
Anonymous Says:

Im flabbergasted!! 300.000 was an "insulting offer", but its ok to convert a shul into a church and justifying it by saying that the proceeds will go to Tzedaka!!!?!
Its unbelievable how $$ can blind people....
A shul is a mikdash me-at, kedusha eino zaz mimkomo! The mishna says how we shouldnt even cut the overgrown grass in an abandoned shul so that people will be distraught at the churbon and do everything possible to rebuild it!
Maybe one should look at R Wasserman as an example. In LA he built a nice Yeshiva building but than didnt have enough people or talmidim to keep it up, so he gave it over to the chabad yeshiva with the condition that the building will be kept as a yeshiva, and that his father name will stay on it.
Its 30 years now that the succesful and ever expanding Yeshiva Ohr Elchonon Chabad is functioning.
The best way to honor you father, Rabbi Sol , is to have others rebuild the community on the condition that the building stays a shul/school and your fathers name is placed on the building.

Actually, in the case of East Nassau, it is perfectly fine to sell the shul to a church. There are certain cases in which a shul can be converted into other types of buildings that a shul isn't normally used for. I see that you have some knowledge of judaism, so I guess it won't shock you if you look in Igros Moshe and see what he says about what you're allowed to do with an abandoned shul. Just in case you don't know what it is, it's a book of questions and answers from Rav Moshe Feinstien. You know what yeshivah he was involved in, right?

46

 May 07, 2009 at 12:23 AM Milhouse Says:

Reply to #45  
Frum yid Says:

Actually, in the case of East Nassau, it is perfectly fine to sell the shul to a church. There are certain cases in which a shul can be converted into other types of buildings that a shul isn't normally used for. I see that you have some knowledge of judaism, so I guess it won't shock you if you look in Igros Moshe and see what he says about what you're allowed to do with an abandoned shul. Just in case you don't know what it is, it's a book of questions and answers from Rav Moshe Feinstien. You know what yeshivah he was involved in, right?

Where does he say it's OK to sell to a church? And what circumstances exist in East Nassau that would justify it, according to RMF?

47

 May 07, 2009 at 01:46 PM PMO Says:

The area around this shul has become increasingly less "frum" over the years. However, there is still a HUGE Jewish population there. This town is the perfect place for kiruv organization to come in and take this over. Whether it is Chabad, or Young Israel, or the OU, it does not matter. There are thousands of Jewish families there that barely know they are Jewish. I could understand if there were no Jews left in Syosset, fine.... but there are thousands!


I understand that Rabbi A wants the money to go to his selected charities, but why not keep the money in the community and let a capable organization work toward bringing people of the community that built the shul back to yiddishkeit??? Is that not just as noble a cause as any other??

48

 May 07, 2009 at 10:32 PM Bottom Line Says:

Rabbi Appleman doesn't appear to have any personal gain from selling the shul. Other than back salary awarded to him, over 2 million dollars will be donated to Jewish organizations and charities throughout the NY area. If Labuvitz were to gain control in the hostal takeover, very little money would be put back into the community, but much would go into their deep pockets, which allows them to continue to look for more prey (struggling shules) to take over.

49

 May 07, 2009 at 10:23 PM The voice of reason says Says:

To me, a convert, this is such a sad situation. It doesn't make any sense. First of all so many people hate the Jews why must we fight amongst ourselves. To me Rabbi Appleman is an amazing person who devoted his entire life to trying to reach out to many people from various backgrounds and show them the real meaning about being Jewish. I am one of the people who have benefited first hand his patience, love for Judaism and passion for Torah. I felt badly as I converted towards the end of East Nassau's active state. I saw the Rabbi attempt to have carnivals for Purim to attract younger children however his attempts or willing to spend his own money few turned out. Partly because I live on the border of Plainview and Syosset and had heard of Rabbi Applemans great reputation and chose him over the 7 other shules. He had such patience and I found I wanted to learn more.
To me it doesn't make sense. I saw the lack of his congregations motivation, initatian and even lack of finances to maintian the shule. Who do you think kept the lights on? water going? I felt so badly that I didn't have money to help him. After all he did for me.
I wish Rabbi Appleman get awarded the rights to his "Families" building as it was built by his father and his family ran it. It is not a "typical" shule owned by the "community"!
Rabbi Appleman doesn't gain anything as he is donating the money to jewish charities which the Lebovitch are blocking so that they can get into a building for nothing! Who is the real sheister?
Also, it was my understanding that Lebovitch come into help a "dying community" however Jericho,Hicksville and Plainview are all well populated and have shules. Maybe Lebovitch should attempt to take over an area that actually needs it!!!!!

50

 May 08, 2009 at 08:01 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #48  
Bottom Line Says:

Rabbi Appleman doesn't appear to have any personal gain from selling the shul. Other than back salary awarded to him, over 2 million dollars will be donated to Jewish organizations and charities throughout the NY area. If Labuvitz were to gain control in the hostal takeover, very little money would be put back into the community, but much would go into their deep pockets, which allows them to continue to look for more prey (struggling shules) to take over.

""Rabbi Appleman doesn't appear to have any personal gain from selling the shul. Other than back salary awarded to him, over 2 million dollars will be donated to Jewish organizations and charities throughout the NY area. If Labuvitz were to gain control in the hostal takeover, very little money would be put back into the community, but much would go into their deep pockets, which allows them to continue to look for more prey (struggling shules) to take over."

Each local Chabad is funded separately, so they are typically very minimally funded.
I often wondered why Chabad wasn't run as one integrated organization with centralized fundraising, so that there might be some economies of scale in funraising, and the ability to run programs where they feel they are most needed, and not just where they can have a branch that is self sustainable.

51

 May 08, 2009 at 08:37 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #48  
Bottom Line Says:

Rabbi Appleman doesn't appear to have any personal gain from selling the shul. Other than back salary awarded to him, over 2 million dollars will be donated to Jewish organizations and charities throughout the NY area. If Labuvitz were to gain control in the hostal takeover, very little money would be put back into the community, but much would go into their deep pockets, which allows them to continue to look for more prey (struggling shules) to take over.

"I wish Rabbi Appleman get awarded the rights to his "Families" building as it was built by his father and his family ran it. It is not a "typical" shule owned by the "community"!
Rabbi Appleman doesn't gain anything as he is donating the money to jewish charities which the Lebovitch are blocking so that they can get into a building for nothing! Who is the real sheister?
Also, it was my understanding that Lebovitch come into help a "dying community" however Jericho,Hicksville and Plainview are all well populated and have shules. Maybe Lebovitch should attempt to take over an area that actually needs it!!!!!


This is not such a simple matter, as Chabad doesn't provide what a normal orthodox shul typically provides. Chabad reaches out to those who aren't observant in order to help them become more observant. Most orthodox shuls do not have so many beginner classes. So many here think that Chabad has such deep pockets, as I used to think, until I found out that each local Chabad is funded separately, so they often also have financial struggles as individual shuls do. I guess worldwide there may be over 400 separate Chabad orgabizations. Many Chabads in the US seem to be classified by the IRS as a "church", so the financial records for them don't seem to be so easy for the general public to obtain. It is not so easy to determine how much the local Chabad is capable of paying. Imo this issue should be handled by a beit din. Perhaps all the publicity this is getting might motivate someone to donate the money to the local Chabad so that they could buy the building at full market value, which would make everyone happy.

52

 May 08, 2009 at 12:08 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #47  
PMO Says:

The area around this shul has become increasingly less "frum" over the years. However, there is still a HUGE Jewish population there. This town is the perfect place for kiruv organization to come in and take this over. Whether it is Chabad, or Young Israel, or the OU, it does not matter. There are thousands of Jewish families there that barely know they are Jewish. I could understand if there were no Jews left in Syosset, fine.... but there are thousands!


I understand that Rabbi A wants the money to go to his selected charities, but why not keep the money in the community and let a capable organization work toward bringing people of the community that built the shul back to yiddishkeit??? Is that not just as noble a cause as any other??

Oh, I get it now! So if the shul stays open and they put in some elbow grease, then the thousands of Jews who live in Syosset will come flocking in! Why didn't they think of that before? Hey, thanks a lot for the input. Maybe the shul should try and do that some time.....like from 1954 to 2004.
Out of the "HUGE Jewish population there" only 10 showed up for Rosh Hashana in 2007. They couldn't get a minyan until 9:45...and the services started at 9.
What about the Yom Kipur services, where they just had 10 people at the end?
How about a guy who lives down the street and didn't want to help make 10 men for prayers on sabbath?
I guess if you keep the shul open, than maybe THIS time people will show up. The reality is, people see a shul closing. That can fabricate an illusion that if it stays open, there's a chance and potential to see it grow once again. The problem is, nobody will come. The shul did try. And tried again. And again.
What will work is if that money from the sale goes and helps Yeshivas that can't pay their bills. A yeshiva that builds men who know halacha (by the way, comment 46, you can find in Igros Moshe CLEARLY what he says about shuls that are dead. Maybe you should learn before you speak) and can help others in effective areas.
The best thing is to see the money go to Yeshivas that are already built up and have people learning and praying there. Why waste peoples money on paying large utility bills on a building that can have up to 5 consistent people show up a week?

53

 May 08, 2009 at 04:31 PM Milhouse Says:

Reply to #52  
Anonymous Says:

Oh, I get it now! So if the shul stays open and they put in some elbow grease, then the thousands of Jews who live in Syosset will come flocking in! Why didn't they think of that before? Hey, thanks a lot for the input. Maybe the shul should try and do that some time.....like from 1954 to 2004.
Out of the "HUGE Jewish population there" only 10 showed up for Rosh Hashana in 2007. They couldn't get a minyan until 9:45...and the services started at 9.
What about the Yom Kipur services, where they just had 10 people at the end?
How about a guy who lives down the street and didn't want to help make 10 men for prayers on sabbath?
I guess if you keep the shul open, than maybe THIS time people will show up. The reality is, people see a shul closing. That can fabricate an illusion that if it stays open, there's a chance and potential to see it grow once again. The problem is, nobody will come. The shul did try. And tried again. And again.
What will work is if that money from the sale goes and helps Yeshivas that can't pay their bills. A yeshiva that builds men who know halacha (by the way, comment 46, you can find in Igros Moshe CLEARLY what he says about shuls that are dead. Maybe you should learn before you speak) and can help others in effective areas.
The best thing is to see the money go to Yeshivas that are already built up and have people learning and praying there. Why waste peoples money on paying large utility bills on a building that can have up to 5 consistent people show up a week?

Why don't you point me to the siman that says it's OK to sell to a church? And why don't you point me to the siman where he lays out criteria, which you claimed include this situation?

54

 May 09, 2009 at 08:50 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #53  
Milhouse Says:

Why don't you point me to the siman that says it's OK to sell to a church? And why don't you point me to the siman where he lays out criteria, which you claimed include this situation?

Well, you can start off with mishnah berura orach chaim siman kuf nun gimel siuf tes about the arbah devarim, look into the biur halacha (it's a long one and includes rishonim who agree on this, such as the Rambam, the Rosh, the Tur and the Riv). In the igros moshe orach chaim chelek aleph siman nun.
Based on what I said in #52, it is clear that this shul applies to what RMF is talking about, being that I saw these events first hand. Did you?

55

 May 10, 2009 at 11:01 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #52  
Anonymous Says:

Oh, I get it now! So if the shul stays open and they put in some elbow grease, then the thousands of Jews who live in Syosset will come flocking in! Why didn't they think of that before? Hey, thanks a lot for the input. Maybe the shul should try and do that some time.....like from 1954 to 2004.
Out of the "HUGE Jewish population there" only 10 showed up for Rosh Hashana in 2007. They couldn't get a minyan until 9:45...and the services started at 9.
What about the Yom Kipur services, where they just had 10 people at the end?
How about a guy who lives down the street and didn't want to help make 10 men for prayers on sabbath?
I guess if you keep the shul open, than maybe THIS time people will show up. The reality is, people see a shul closing. That can fabricate an illusion that if it stays open, there's a chance and potential to see it grow once again. The problem is, nobody will come. The shul did try. And tried again. And again.
What will work is if that money from the sale goes and helps Yeshivas that can't pay their bills. A yeshiva that builds men who know halacha (by the way, comment 46, you can find in Igros Moshe CLEARLY what he says about shuls that are dead. Maybe you should learn before you speak) and can help others in effective areas.
The best thing is to see the money go to Yeshivas that are already built up and have people learning and praying there. Why waste peoples money on paying large utility bills on a building that can have up to 5 consistent people show up a week?

"We have been bamboozled!" Quote from congregant that at first believed that Rabbi Aplleman was going to rebuild the Shul and not really intent on selling it to a Missionary Church.
In Nassau County Court filings outraged congregants have documented a systemic co-orindated plan to destroy ENHC in order to realize it's monetary assets. The 2007 High Holy Day services were part of that plan to justify ENHC dissolution. Rabbi Appleman in assuming control of ENHC when father became ill began the decline of ENHC. His temperment and often negative personality traits did not relate to the 99% secular non-orthodox congregation and community. Failure in his management and marketing skills compounded the decline. When Rabbi Appleman divorced and then remarried a wealth woman in the real estate business, moving to the Five Towns and no longer serving on-site as Rabbi, he further set in motion ENHC's decline by forcing (despite congregants objections) the leasing of ENHC to TALI Yeshiva. The Yeshiva's installation and strong orthodox mode of operation sent a glaring message to the intelligent astute overwhelming secular congregation base of ENHC - that they did not fit and that their needs and orientation were not spiritually and materially being addressed. Not surprisingly, they went elsewhere or nowhere. Little effort was made to market and outreach to this communities demographics (Kiruv - secular large Jewish population). TALI fails due to their many own missteps and Rabbi Appleman lists ENHC with the real estate broker Victoria K. Fischer, Manhattan. The broker admits that the Shul is being sold to a Missiony Church. The congregants and community are outraged and band together an initiate legal action to stop the sale to the Missionary Church. The full details of this story are in the Court filings, but to make this brief Rabbi Appleman in a series of co-ordinated actions closes down the Shul, only opens it on a few brief occassions, has security guards blocking admitance to members and/or community that do not agree and support him. The results are no surprise. The Shul fails because Rabbi Appleman, whose family long ago hijacked the goverance of ENHC despite NYS charity law rules for Not For Profit religious charities, manipulated directs that result. Furthermore, Rabbi Appleman's disengenuous claim that he was "insulted" by an offer to give him $300,000 because the Shul is worth on paper $2.5 millsion and the three Shul owned houses another $2 miilion or more. The NYS NPO charities law indicates that Rabbi Appleman is not an "owner" but only an "employee." Yet he blocks the congregation from rebuilding the Shul with experienced capable new management that would be able to relate and market to the large Jewish population in this and the surrounding community. He says he has tried, however, if the monetary bar was that they had to pay him millions of dollars, realistically there would be no buyers. Contolling self-interest also makes these claims suspect. Allies, cronies, predator competitor community interests also aid and abet this contrived viewpoint. Others also stand to gain monetarily from the dissolution of ENHC to varies marignal local Shuls and charities. Perhaps the rationalization is that the congregation and community here are deserving of their demise because they are not orthodox, they don't like or respond to Rabbi Appeman, they came little and late to High Holy Day services and as a result the money could better be used in supporting Rabbi Appleman's designated orthodox Yeshiva's and charities. The bottom line is, however, that in being divisive and not working together to solve this issue and keep ENHC a Jewish Shul (there are competent organizations and people out there willing and able to do the job, but an unbiased community group needs to be involved) a Missiony Church will begin a dramatic demographic change (launched by the Missiony Church as a platform for their mission) that will engulf and ensure the steady demise of all Jewish life in this and the surrounding communities, orthodox and non-orthodox. This pattern has been repeated in many communties. Open pandoras box and all others in this and surrounding communities will soon be fighting "alone" for their survival as a Jewish community. Look around it is already happening. By not working unselfishly for our Jewish community interests ENHC will provide a central and large platform to change the demographic character for all. Wake up and don't let this happen! Shalom.

56

 May 10, 2009 at 12:49 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #55  
Anonymous Says:

"We have been bamboozled!" Quote from congregant that at first believed that Rabbi Aplleman was going to rebuild the Shul and not really intent on selling it to a Missionary Church.
In Nassau County Court filings outraged congregants have documented a systemic co-orindated plan to destroy ENHC in order to realize it's monetary assets. The 2007 High Holy Day services were part of that plan to justify ENHC dissolution. Rabbi Appleman in assuming control of ENHC when father became ill began the decline of ENHC. His temperment and often negative personality traits did not relate to the 99% secular non-orthodox congregation and community. Failure in his management and marketing skills compounded the decline. When Rabbi Appleman divorced and then remarried a wealth woman in the real estate business, moving to the Five Towns and no longer serving on-site as Rabbi, he further set in motion ENHC's decline by forcing (despite congregants objections) the leasing of ENHC to TALI Yeshiva. The Yeshiva's installation and strong orthodox mode of operation sent a glaring message to the intelligent astute overwhelming secular congregation base of ENHC - that they did not fit and that their needs and orientation were not spiritually and materially being addressed. Not surprisingly, they went elsewhere or nowhere. Little effort was made to market and outreach to this communities demographics (Kiruv - secular large Jewish population). TALI fails due to their many own missteps and Rabbi Appleman lists ENHC with the real estate broker Victoria K. Fischer, Manhattan. The broker admits that the Shul is being sold to a Missiony Church. The congregants and community are outraged and band together an initiate legal action to stop the sale to the Missionary Church. The full details of this story are in the Court filings, but to make this brief Rabbi Appleman in a series of co-ordinated actions closes down the Shul, only opens it on a few brief occassions, has security guards blocking admitance to members and/or community that do not agree and support him. The results are no surprise. The Shul fails because Rabbi Appleman, whose family long ago hijacked the goverance of ENHC despite NYS charity law rules for Not For Profit religious charities, manipulated directs that result. Furthermore, Rabbi Appleman's disengenuous claim that he was "insulted" by an offer to give him $300,000 because the Shul is worth on paper $2.5 millsion and the three Shul owned houses another $2 miilion or more. The NYS NPO charities law indicates that Rabbi Appleman is not an "owner" but only an "employee." Yet he blocks the congregation from rebuilding the Shul with experienced capable new management that would be able to relate and market to the large Jewish population in this and the surrounding community. He says he has tried, however, if the monetary bar was that they had to pay him millions of dollars, realistically there would be no buyers. Contolling self-interest also makes these claims suspect. Allies, cronies, predator competitor community interests also aid and abet this contrived viewpoint. Others also stand to gain monetarily from the dissolution of ENHC to varies marignal local Shuls and charities. Perhaps the rationalization is that the congregation and community here are deserving of their demise because they are not orthodox, they don't like or respond to Rabbi Appeman, they came little and late to High Holy Day services and as a result the money could better be used in supporting Rabbi Appleman's designated orthodox Yeshiva's and charities. The bottom line is, however, that in being divisive and not working together to solve this issue and keep ENHC a Jewish Shul (there are competent organizations and people out there willing and able to do the job, but an unbiased community group needs to be involved) a Missiony Church will begin a dramatic demographic change (launched by the Missiony Church as a platform for their mission) that will engulf and ensure the steady demise of all Jewish life in this and the surrounding communities, orthodox and non-orthodox. This pattern has been repeated in many communties. Open pandoras box and all others in this and surrounding communities will soon be fighting "alone" for their survival as a Jewish community. Look around it is already happening. By not working unselfishly for our Jewish community interests ENHC will provide a central and large platform to change the demographic character for all. Wake up and don't let this happen! Shalom.

As I said in previous posts, this shul must not be looked at in isolation, but instead a solution that is best for the entire community needs to be worked out. A beis din could collect financial and demographic data for all the shuls in the local area, then determine if there is indeed an excess of shuls and if so which would make the most sense to close. It boils down to locations, capacities, operating expenses, financials, etc. If a few shuls in the local area are operating at deficits and have been doing so for a few years, then perhaps one or more shuls should close. If a shul should be closed, is this the best one to close, or would it make sense to close a different one?

Since your post states that Rabbi Appleman is no longer living in the local area of the shul, I am wondering if there is a full time rabbi there now? If not, then it is understandable that membership in the shul would decline. What are the capacities of the other shul buildings in the area and this one? Is this one much larger than any of the others? How does its expenses compare with those of the others? Perhaps it might make sense for another congregation in the area to be relocated into this space, and their old buiding be sold instead? Imo this really an issue for a beis din to solve and determine what is best for the community overall, after collecting plenty of data on all the shuls in the local area.

I can see compelling arguments on both sides of this issue, but without plenty of data on all the shuls in the area and how their combined memberships is situated geographically , imo the best solution can't be determined.

57

 May 10, 2009 at 02:56 PM reality check Says:

After reading this story in the paper I became intrigued as my grandfather was married in East Nassau Hebrew Congregation. I used to attend on the high holidays however I moved to another state and no longer am able to attend. I researched the alleged alligations towards Rabbi Appleman. It is unbelievable how in todays time anyone can make up anything they want and bring it to court as fact. For example, I recall one of the memebers who is bringing these lies to court, is an intermarried cohen. Now this is an obvious pathetic attempt at simple name calling which we all learned can ruin a reputation. I made a phone call to Rabbi Appleman offering any help as I am a lawyer and would love to set the record straight. Rabbi Appleman is a sincere, kind hearted one of a kind person who devotes his time to teaching others. I can't say the same for the ones making the accusations.

58

 May 11, 2009 at 08:12 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #56  
Anonymous Says:

As I said in previous posts, this shul must not be looked at in isolation, but instead a solution that is best for the entire community needs to be worked out. A beis din could collect financial and demographic data for all the shuls in the local area, then determine if there is indeed an excess of shuls and if so which would make the most sense to close. It boils down to locations, capacities, operating expenses, financials, etc. If a few shuls in the local area are operating at deficits and have been doing so for a few years, then perhaps one or more shuls should close. If a shul should be closed, is this the best one to close, or would it make sense to close a different one?

Since your post states that Rabbi Appleman is no longer living in the local area of the shul, I am wondering if there is a full time rabbi there now? If not, then it is understandable that membership in the shul would decline. What are the capacities of the other shul buildings in the area and this one? Is this one much larger than any of the others? How does its expenses compare with those of the others? Perhaps it might make sense for another congregation in the area to be relocated into this space, and their old buiding be sold instead? Imo this really an issue for a beis din to solve and determine what is best for the community overall, after collecting plenty of data on all the shuls in the local area.

I can see compelling arguments on both sides of this issue, but without plenty of data on all the shuls in the area and how their combined memberships is situated geographically , imo the best solution can't be determined.

Rabbi Appleman was first issued an Ikul by the Beis Din enjoining him not to proceed in Civil Court to dissolve ENHC religious corporation. He ignored that and all pleas to come to the Beis Din and as a result the Beis Din issued Rabbi Sol Appleman a Seruv.

59

 May 11, 2009 at 11:42 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #58  
Anonymous Says:

Rabbi Appleman was first issued an Ikul by the Beis Din enjoining him not to proceed in Civil Court to dissolve ENHC religious corporation. He ignored that and all pleas to come to the Beis Din and as a result the Beis Din issued Rabbi Sol Appleman a Seruv.

Actually, Rabbi Appleman was first summoned to a Civil Court, and he then summoned those people to Beis Din. They ignored the summons to Beis Din and were issued a seruv. He was then allowed to proceed in Civil Court.
After that, he was summoned to Beis Din (which is where you start your story) on baseless terms.

60

 May 11, 2009 at 12:13 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #59  
Anonymous Says:

Actually, Rabbi Appleman was first summoned to a Civil Court, and he then summoned those people to Beis Din. They ignored the summons to Beis Din and were issued a seruv. He was then allowed to proceed in Civil Court.
After that, he was summoned to Beis Din (which is where you start your story) on baseless terms.

Though those in opposition to Rabbi Appleman's hijacking of the goverance of ENHC as the NYS NPO charities law indicates is only an "employee" living in the Five Towns at first initiated legal action to save ENHC from becoming a Missionary Church, after recieving notice from Rabbi Appleman's Beis Din did agree to resolve the issue there, however, once we agreed to meet in Beis Din Rabbi Appleman disingenously found an excuse not to meet in that Beis Din. Further efforts to meet in Beis Din showed Rabbi Appleman's real intent - which was to sell the Shul to a Missionary Church and to award the pirated assets of ENHC to his self-dealing friends and cronies who would receive assets from ENHC property sold at below market value and inflated commisions.

61

 May 11, 2009 at 12:12 PM Anonymous Says:

Perhaps a different beit din could be chosen?

62

 May 11, 2009 at 02:24 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #59  
Anonymous Says:

Actually, Rabbi Appleman was first summoned to a Civil Court, and he then summoned those people to Beis Din. They ignored the summons to Beis Din and were issued a seruv. He was then allowed to proceed in Civil Court.
After that, he was summoned to Beis Din (which is where you start your story) on baseless terms.

What seems so sad here is that Rabbi Appleman instaed of being a moral paragon seeking every way possible to preserve Yiddishkeit at ENHC he finds every excuse to "outwit" the moral "intent" of Torah and Judaism by legal trickery and loopholes to justify his self-serving actions.
Our common purpose should find a way to ensure that ENHC does not become a Missionary Church. In that respect, I hope that Hashem would give Rabbi Appleman and his supporters a "new positve" spirit of common purpose working with the ENHC community (even if they are not so orthodox as his Five Towns home) to rebuild ENHC not to destroy it!

63

 May 12, 2009 at 08:55 PM Anonymous Says:

All who read these posts should note that the only person who posts his name here is Rabbi Appleman. The others, for whatever reason will not take responsibilty for their words. As someone who lives in the area, I can uncategorically state that the people trying to block the sale, did not regularly attend (not to mention that they did not provide financially support to East Nassau.)

The congregation was never Chabbad and the people who donated all the money to the shul did not donate it to a Shul that was Chabbad. There is a true theological differences between "Chabbad" , and all prior religious leaders and lay leaders of East Nassau.

The members who did donate to East Nassau, were not donating to Chabbad when they made donations. While the supporters of Chabbad who want this building, object to the influence of Rabbi Appleman, it is no secret that Chabbad Shuls and the corporations they form are wholly controled by the families of those Chabbad Rabbis.

Why do these people not object to the local Chabbad Rabbis who live in mansions paid for by donations? Why should the donations paid to East Nassau, a traditional/modern orthodox shul somehow go to benefit a theologically alien group of Lubavitch Hasidim? This is not to say Chabbad is not a worthy charity, it is simply not the organization that the benefactors of East Nassau donated their money too!

There has not been a large enough congregation nor donations to support East Nassau and pay their Rabbi for over 20 years. But for the largess of the Appleman family and Rabbi Appleman working for no or little pay the shul would have closed long ago. Many other local shuls have closed, and their building sold including the Hicksville Jewish Center, The Israel Community Center in Levittown, Bethpage Jewish Center and the Farmindale Jewish Center. There is nothing nefarious about those shuls or this shul, closing. It is simply a refection of changing demographics!

Forcing a charity to spend money on litigation instead of having the remaining money go to benefit similar theologically oriented organizations, is despicable. It is this travesty that the Attorney General should be looking into.

64

 May 12, 2009 at 10:12 PM Anonymous Says:

It is interesting to note that this same "newpaper" ran an article about East Nassau and the law suit brought against Rabbi Appleman about 2 years ago. Why didn't this news rag, report it when the cases brought by the same rabbleroisers, was dismissed by the court for being without merit?

This paper is not interested in trueth but only in smearing the name of a torah scholar!

65

 May 13, 2009 at 10:50 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #64  
Anonymous Says:

It is interesting to note that this same "newpaper" ran an article about East Nassau and the law suit brought against Rabbi Appleman about 2 years ago. Why didn't this news rag, report it when the cases brought by the same rabbleroisers, was dismissed by the court for being without merit?

This paper is not interested in trueth but only in smearing the name of a torah scholar!

Your information is incorrect. The court dissmissed the case at the time because of technical issues, not that the case was without merit. It is presently waiting to be heard by the court.

66

 May 13, 2009 at 10:48 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #63  
Anonymous Says:

All who read these posts should note that the only person who posts his name here is Rabbi Appleman. The others, for whatever reason will not take responsibilty for their words. As someone who lives in the area, I can uncategorically state that the people trying to block the sale, did not regularly attend (not to mention that they did not provide financially support to East Nassau.)

The congregation was never Chabbad and the people who donated all the money to the shul did not donate it to a Shul that was Chabbad. There is a true theological differences between "Chabbad" , and all prior religious leaders and lay leaders of East Nassau.

The members who did donate to East Nassau, were not donating to Chabbad when they made donations. While the supporters of Chabbad who want this building, object to the influence of Rabbi Appleman, it is no secret that Chabbad Shuls and the corporations they form are wholly controled by the families of those Chabbad Rabbis.

Why do these people not object to the local Chabbad Rabbis who live in mansions paid for by donations? Why should the donations paid to East Nassau, a traditional/modern orthodox shul somehow go to benefit a theologically alien group of Lubavitch Hasidim? This is not to say Chabbad is not a worthy charity, it is simply not the organization that the benefactors of East Nassau donated their money too!

There has not been a large enough congregation nor donations to support East Nassau and pay their Rabbi for over 20 years. But for the largess of the Appleman family and Rabbi Appleman working for no or little pay the shul would have closed long ago. Many other local shuls have closed, and their building sold including the Hicksville Jewish Center, The Israel Community Center in Levittown, Bethpage Jewish Center and the Farmindale Jewish Center. There is nothing nefarious about those shuls or this shul, closing. It is simply a refection of changing demographics!

Forcing a charity to spend money on litigation instead of having the remaining money go to benefit similar theologically oriented organizations, is despicable. It is this travesty that the Attorney General should be looking into.

Living in the area does mean your opinions are accurately informed. In fact, those who are objecting to the sale of ENHC are long term congregants who 'regularly attended services and are documented Board members. While you cite other Shuls whose decline could have been the result of demographics ENHC's decline was largely orchestrated by the personality of Rabbi Appleman, his mismangement, remarrying and moving to the Five Towns and decision to systematically disenfranchise it's congregation in order to walk away with a golden parachute. Your comments about Chabad are also wildly missinformed. Though Chabad had shown interest in the past concerning a sale of ENHC with Rabbi Appleman it didn't work out. Chabad is not taking over ENHC. The community and real congregants who live here, attended regular services for many years and who are documented Board members have many alternative vigorous skilled modern orthodox sources whose skill in Kiruv and outreach to the dominate secular population in this area of over 28,000 Jews (according to recent census) will with that competent management revive, rebuild and prosper ENHC. What is "nefarious" is the Rabbi Appleman hijacked the goverance of ENHC and with a group who do not live in this community, are his relatives and friends, stand to predatory benefit from the disbursement of the assets of ENHC (such as nearby failing Shuls). All the while by inserting a Missionary Church in this community who will as a result be the one which fundamentely changes the demographics here and in surrounding Shuls and communities, orthodox and non-orthodox alike. That is the most important realization. Furthermore, if you were better informed and read the Attorney General's opinion you would see that Rabbi Appleman has not provided the transparent accountability that was requested in her letters to him. Instead, as usual it is Rabbi Appleman's way or the highway as he ignores the Beit Din Seruv on him and schemes to find ways to proceed in Civil Court. If anything, Rabbi Appleman in his self-dtermined egocentric manner has caused the wasting of thousands of dollars that could better be used in rebuilding ENHC with loving, dynamic competent new management.

67

 May 13, 2009 at 12:08 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #65  
Anonymous Says:

Your information is incorrect. The court dissmissed the case at the time because of technical issues, not that the case was without merit. It is presently waiting to be heard by the court.

I just went to the court and read the paper at the county clerks office and you have been deceived or are trying to deceive others. The case was dismissed be for 2 reasons. Th case was dismissed for lack of standing (which in layman's terms means the people of group of people who brought the case did not have a legal right to maintain the action). Is that what you meant by a technicality?

The secod reason the court gave for the dismissal was even more revealing. It said the "alleged facts" presented by the petitioners had "no probative value". Having no probative value means in a nut shell that there was no evidence (just smoke and mirrors) to support the claims being made. Is this what you meant by a technicality?

Anyone who has an interest in knowing the trueth should read all the old court papers. (They also contain some good material for a sit.com.) They make clear that the people attacking Rabbi Appleman have no legal standing, no evidence of any of their claims and are merely trying to harrass and coerce him into giving them whatever they want.

68

 May 13, 2009 at 03:42 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #67  
Anonymous Says:

I just went to the court and read the paper at the county clerks office and you have been deceived or are trying to deceive others. The case was dismissed be for 2 reasons. Th case was dismissed for lack of standing (which in layman's terms means the people of group of people who brought the case did not have a legal right to maintain the action). Is that what you meant by a technicality?

The secod reason the court gave for the dismissal was even more revealing. It said the "alleged facts" presented by the petitioners had "no probative value". Having no probative value means in a nut shell that there was no evidence (just smoke and mirrors) to support the claims being made. Is this what you meant by a technicality?

Anyone who has an interest in knowing the trueth should read all the old court papers. (They also contain some good material for a sit.com.) They make clear that the people attacking Rabbi Appleman have no legal standing, no evidence of any of their claims and are merely trying to harrass and coerce him into giving them whatever they want.

Funny, the Attorney General doesn't seem to agree with you!

69

 May 13, 2009 at 05:15 PM Anonymous Says:

I believe you misrepresent what the court said. The court said: "First, same are of no probative value because they were made on the grounds of the affirmants' religious beliefs and were not notarized as required by CPLR2309." Not having the petition to the court notarized of the congregants who held a meeting on January 29, 2007 was what the "tecnnicality" was meant. But if you parse words...
It is also glaringly apparent that you are an enabler of Rabbi Appleman, have no sense of common Jewish community spirit and have even less trouble seeing ENHC become a MISSIONARY CHURCH! It seems we Jews don't need our enemies to work against us we have more than enough of our own willing do that.

70

 Aug 07, 2009 at 09:02 AM Anonymous Says:

I am a former student of Rabbi Sol Appleman. I was Bar Mitzvahed by him in 1984. When my grandfather died in 1982, Rabbi Sol and is father Rabbi Morris hung a plaque in his memory in the temple. When my other Grandfather died in 1991, Rabbi Sol and his father both came to my house to sit Shiva. I visited camp Tagola on numerous occasions and witnessed how they worked with the children so as to have them enjoy there summer. I worked there during summers with the caterers during high school. I can say firsthand, that as a new father, the stories i recall of the Old Testament and whatever knowledge of Jewish Traditions and Holidays that i have and will share with my daughter, were taught to me by Rabbi Sol Appleman.

He has always been a true and caring Rabbi with the best interests of the Jewish people at heart. His family not only built East Nassau but worked there,cultivated its growth, attended to its needs, built its reputation and I am proud to have learned and been Bar Mitzvahed there. When my parents first moved to Syosset they had a choice between numerous Synogogues and chose ENHC due in large part to the trust and faith they had in the Appleman family, Sol included.

I am not religious, rarely attend Shul (except most high Holy Days) and certainly dont consider myself an observant Jew. However, i am proud to be a Jew and remember my younger years with good memories of how the Appleman Family treated all of us.

I cannot speak to the goings on with this recent sale or non sale. what i can speak to is the character of Rabbi Sol Appleman. He is a good and caring man who has always demonstrated that he has the best interests of ENHC and the Jewish people at heart. Those who castigate him, insult him or insinuate that his objectives here are not with good intentions should be ashamed of themselves......

71

 Feb 21, 2010 at 09:19 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #67  
Anonymous Says:

I just went to the court and read the paper at the county clerks office and you have been deceived or are trying to deceive others. The case was dismissed be for 2 reasons. Th case was dismissed for lack of standing (which in layman's terms means the people of group of people who brought the case did not have a legal right to maintain the action). Is that what you meant by a technicality?

The secod reason the court gave for the dismissal was even more revealing. It said the "alleged facts" presented by the petitioners had "no probative value". Having no probative value means in a nut shell that there was no evidence (just smoke and mirrors) to support the claims being made. Is this what you meant by a technicality?

Anyone who has an interest in knowing the trueth should read all the old court papers. (They also contain some good material for a sit.com.) They make clear that the people attacking Rabbi Appleman have no legal standing, no evidence of any of their claims and are merely trying to harrass and coerce him into giving them whatever they want.

This decision was revisited in light of new evidence showing Gerald Reiff and Mottehedeh family were long time members. Litigation is currently in front of Phelan. If you read the old papers without reading the opinion of the court in the current case allowing Appleman's opponents - who unlike him live in community - to go forward you do not get the whole picture. The issue now is how Appleman, a former employee of the Shul, has standing to lock the place up sell its real estate and loot it assets. He claims a board consisting of his relatives and his accountant approved all this but he appointed them and the certificate of incorpation says they are to be elected. At his deposition he claimed there were no Jews in Syosett or neigboring Jericho. When told there was a kosher butcher in both towns he said they were not sufficient to his standards. So the kosher butcher is not kosher enough but it OK to sell East Nassau to a church in violation of the injunction of the Beis Din. This man is in for a fall because he is arrogant and selfrightous.

72

 Feb 21, 2010 at 09:30 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #66  
Anonymous Says:

Living in the area does mean your opinions are accurately informed. In fact, those who are objecting to the sale of ENHC are long term congregants who 'regularly attended services and are documented Board members. While you cite other Shuls whose decline could have been the result of demographics ENHC's decline was largely orchestrated by the personality of Rabbi Appleman, his mismangement, remarrying and moving to the Five Towns and decision to systematically disenfranchise it's congregation in order to walk away with a golden parachute. Your comments about Chabad are also wildly missinformed. Though Chabad had shown interest in the past concerning a sale of ENHC with Rabbi Appleman it didn't work out. Chabad is not taking over ENHC. The community and real congregants who live here, attended regular services for many years and who are documented Board members have many alternative vigorous skilled modern orthodox sources whose skill in Kiruv and outreach to the dominate secular population in this area of over 28,000 Jews (according to recent census) will with that competent management revive, rebuild and prosper ENHC. What is "nefarious" is the Rabbi Appleman hijacked the goverance of ENHC and with a group who do not live in this community, are his relatives and friends, stand to predatory benefit from the disbursement of the assets of ENHC (such as nearby failing Shuls). All the while by inserting a Missionary Church in this community who will as a result be the one which fundamentely changes the demographics here and in surrounding Shuls and communities, orthodox and non-orthodox alike. That is the most important realization. Furthermore, if you were better informed and read the Attorney General's opinion you would see that Rabbi Appleman has not provided the transparent accountability that was requested in her letters to him. Instead, as usual it is Rabbi Appleman's way or the highway as he ignores the Beit Din Seruv on him and schemes to find ways to proceed in Civil Court. If anything, Rabbi Appleman in his self-dtermined egocentric manner has caused the wasting of thousands of dollars that could better be used in rebuilding ENHC with loving, dynamic competent new management.

Correct - actually Chadad of Woodbury is now opposing the community fearing that if East Nassau reopens it is competition for them. Appleman offered the group opposing him one of the three houses owned by East Nassau to function as a small shul if they would agree to let the Shul building be sold to a church. It was insisted that he return the eight torahs worth $250K and he refused so the settlement fell apart. At his deposition - at which I was present - he admitted giving the torah scrolls to a shul in Woodmere near his home that was also slated to get money from the proceeds of the sale East Nassau's real estate. If an elected board did not approve this essentially this is theft because - and this is what Appleman does not want to understand - he is a former employee of the shul. Period. It is not his property. The Attorney General's office notified Appleman that they will depose him as well about the mony check he wrote off Easy Nassau's bank account at a time when supposedly the place was defunct. Anyone wants to watch it will be in Nassau Supreme Wednesday.

73

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