Welcome, Guest! - or
Easy to remember!  »  VinNews.com

Washington - OU: TSA To Permit Lulavim And Esrogim During Airplane Travel

Published on: October 1, 2009 02:11 PM
By: OU PR - VIN News
Change text size Text Size  
Bookmark and Share

Washington - Today, the national Transportation Security Administration (TSA) declared a special travel period for the Jewish holiday of Sukkot.  The travel period will begin approximately on Wednesday, September 30, 2009, and end on approximately on Tuesday, October 13, 2009.  This policy will allow observant Jewish travelers to carry their Lulavim and Etrogim in airports and through security checkpoints. (During the Sukkot holiday, Jews utilize four species of plants as part of their daily prayer service. See Leviticus 23:40.)

        The Orthodox Union (Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America), the nation’s largest Orthodox Jewish umbrella organization, approached TSA to issue this important policy.

        “TSA works closely with members of the Jewish faith to ensure our security workforce is familiar with the religious holiday Sukkot, and is familiar with the prayer items that passengers may be traveling with,” said Kimberly Walton, Special Counselor for the Transportation Security Administration”.

Advertisement:

        Nathan Diament, public policy director of the Orthodox Union stated:

        “The Orthodox Union is pleased to work with TSA on this important issue.  This special travel period will allow observant Jews to travel freely during Sukkot while still being able to practice the laws of Lulav and Etrog that are crucial to the holiday’s observance. We commend TSA on all of their efforts.” 

Here is the alert form the TSA web site 


More of today's headlines

Washington - When a poll was posted to the popular social networking site Facebook asking if President Obama should be killed, the Secret Service launched an... Litchfield, CT - The attorney for the Town of Litchfield has filed a motion to dismiss a federal lawsuit claiming discrimination in the rejection of a bid to expand a...

 

You can now automatically hide comments - New!

Don't worry, you can always display comments when you need to.

Total20

Read Comments (20)  —  Post Yours »

1

 Oct 01, 2009 at 02:16 PM Anonymous Says:

The tip of lulovim are very sharp, the Yidden should take care not to poke people with it.

2

 Oct 01, 2009 at 02:21 PM Anonymous Says:

Can I travel with a pop up Sukkah?

3

 Oct 01, 2009 at 02:30 PM BoredJew.Com Says:

awesome, hope some idiot screws it up.. by doing something stupid with it. like start poking people..

4

 Oct 01, 2009 at 02:29 PM formally Says:

yes this happens under the Obama administration for all you obama haters

5

 Oct 01, 2009 at 02:27 PM Anonymous Says:

I'm not sure this is a good precedent. Do the Sikhs now get to travel with their ceremonial swords? More importantly, do islamic terrorists get to board a plane with the "tools of their trade" since they view suicide bombing as a chiyuv under the jihadist view of the Koran.

6

 Oct 01, 2009 at 02:46 PM Aryeh Says:

We have always been able to travel with lulavim, why the fanfaire? On the other hand, I was once asked to dismantle several mezuzot scrolls for inspection at the Burlington airport. I prayed (without shoes on) that the confused security officer wouldn't want to tear apart anything else.

7

 Oct 01, 2009 at 02:58 PM Anonymous Says:

its funny that both the OU and the Agudah are claiming credit for this.

8

 Oct 01, 2009 at 02:57 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #5  
Anonymous Says:

I'm not sure this is a good precedent. Do the Sikhs now get to travel with their ceremonial swords? More importantly, do islamic terrorists get to board a plane with the "tools of their trade" since they view suicide bombing as a chiyuv under the jihadist view of the Koran.

OH PLEASE. be happy we live in such a great country. you are probably just an obnama hater who wouldnt react this way if it happened during bush time.

9

 Oct 01, 2009 at 03:26 PM Arnold Says:

Is there an exemption for bringing a lulav and esrog into the US from Canada by car? Can anyone supply a link? Thank you

10

 Oct 01, 2009 at 02:50 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #5  
Anonymous Says:

I'm not sure this is a good precedent. Do the Sikhs now get to travel with their ceremonial swords? More importantly, do islamic terrorists get to board a plane with the "tools of their trade" since they view suicide bombing as a chiyuv under the jihadist view of the Koran.

You do realize that the things you mentioned are weapons, right?

11

 Oct 01, 2009 at 03:35 PM Anonymous Says:

only in america! hooray for the obama administration1 they are ture ohavei yisroel...oh wait, they ARE all jews

12

 Oct 01, 2009 at 03:36 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #6  
Aryeh Says:

We have always been able to travel with lulavim, why the fanfaire? On the other hand, I was once asked to dismantle several mezuzot scrolls for inspection at the Burlington airport. I prayed (without shoes on) that the confused security officer wouldn't want to tear apart anything else.

read the link - the "fain fare" is an advisory to airline staff to not think that the people are engaged in something shady or strange teyrrist like activity

13

 Oct 01, 2009 at 02:40 PM Milhouse Says:

Reply to #5  
Anonymous Says:

I'm not sure this is a good precedent. Do the Sikhs now get to travel with their ceremonial swords? More importantly, do islamic terrorists get to board a plane with the "tools of their trade" since they view suicide bombing as a chiyuv under the jihadist view of the Koran.

No, they don't. Because they're dangerous and we're not.

As for Sikhs, they should be allowed to board with their kirpans, but most seem to find a way to get around it. Either they interpret the requirement to be armed loosely enough to count a kirpan that's in the luggage compartment, or they use a non-metal one that the detectors don't pick up.

14

 Oct 01, 2009 at 04:13 PM Anonymous Says:

Does xraying the esrog hurt the fruit?

15

 Oct 01, 2009 at 04:28 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #13  
Milhouse Says:

No, they don't. Because they're dangerous and we're not.

As for Sikhs, they should be allowed to board with their kirpans, but most seem to find a way to get around it. Either they interpret the requirement to be armed loosely enough to count a kirpan that's in the luggage compartment, or they use a non-metal one that the detectors don't pick up.

You may think all yiddin are not dangerous, but I assure you the TSA does not. ALL travelers should be treated with the same level respect but I would be just as worried about some terrorist dressed up as chassid as one who fit the steretype of an "arab terrorist".

16

 Oct 01, 2009 at 04:26 PM AuthenticSatmar Says:

Seems like someone in the OU is close to someone at the TSA. First the 0U hosted the TSA screeners course, and now they are reassuring we can take a lulav onboard.

17

 Oct 01, 2009 at 05:20 PM Anonymous Says:

So, you buy a Lulav and Etrog imported from Eretz Yisrael and then fly it back where it came from.

18

 Oct 01, 2009 at 09:07 PM Milhouse Says:

Reply to #17  
Anonymous Says:

So, you buy a Lulav and Etrog imported from Eretz Yisrael and then fly it back where it came from.

What makes you think anyone is doing that? Though it does make sense, if you're flying there on erev yomtov.

19

 Oct 02, 2009 at 11:16 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #18  
Milhouse Says:

What makes you think anyone is doing that? Though it does make sense, if you're flying there on erev yomtov.

Just because the TSA should let you through security, doesn't negate the fact that it is illegal to travel with any Lulav and Esrog internationally.

Unless you have an import license, and store the agricultural products in a bonded facility and quarantined - you may not bring these or any other similar items into the USA, UK, Israel, etc.

If you smuggle them in, that's your responsibility. I cannot forget last year flying from Israel with (only) an esrog (no lulav or anything else). It was in my checked baggage - not carry on. The dogs were out in full force at Newark, and my bags were opened in customs.

Not only was the esrog confiscated, I was given a warning and explained that it was a federal offence for which I could be fined. The customs officer happened to be Jewish himself (as he told me) and thus he "let it slide only with a confiscation".

20

 Oct 02, 2009 at 01:36 PM Milhouse Says:

Reply to #19  
Anonymous Says:

Just because the TSA should let you through security, doesn't negate the fact that it is illegal to travel with any Lulav and Esrog internationally.

Unless you have an import license, and store the agricultural products in a bonded facility and quarantined - you may not bring these or any other similar items into the USA, UK, Israel, etc.

If you smuggle them in, that's your responsibility. I cannot forget last year flying from Israel with (only) an esrog (no lulav or anything else). It was in my checked baggage - not carry on. The dogs were out in full force at Newark, and my bags were opened in customs.

Not only was the esrog confiscated, I was given a warning and explained that it was a federal offence for which I could be fined. The customs officer happened to be Jewish himself (as he told me) and thus he "let it slide only with a confiscation".

This is not true. You are allowed to bring ONE esrog into Israel legally.

21

Sign-in to post a comment

Scroll Up
Advertisements:

Sell your scrap gold and broken jewelry and earn hard cash sell gold today!