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Dallas, TX - Halloween Ruled Out as Influence in Hate Crime at Kosher Restaurant

Published on: November 1, 2009 06:30 PM
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  Graffiti was found on Natalies Kitchen and International Market over the weekend. OSCAR DURAND/DMNThe vandalism probably will qualify as a hate crime, the Anti-Defamation League says.   Graffiti was found on Natalies Kitchen and International Market over the weekend. OSCAR DURAND/DMNThe vandalism probably will qualify as a hate crime, the Anti-Defamation League says.

Dallas, TX - Natalie and Yohai Pinhas don’t think it was Halloween pranksters that spray-painted obscene and anti-semitic graffiti on the sidewalk and near the front door of their kosher restaurant and market in Far North Dallas.

“It could be, but why curse? Mr. Pinhas said Sunday after his wife, Natalie found the vandalism when she arrived at the restaurant Sunday morning. ““I believe it’s not Halloween.”

Mark Briskman, ADL (Anti-Defamation League) regional director in Dallas, said such incidents were rare in this area. He confirmed the burglary last week of a synagogue in Sherman in which property was damaged and items were taken.

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A link between the cases seems unlikely, Briskman said, because Sherman police arrested two suspects in that case Thursday night or early Friday morning. The vandalism at Natalie’s Kitchen was done Saturday night.

Briskman said the Sherman case appears to be a crime of opportunity with alcohol involved rather than a hate crime. He said similar offenses have been reported by Sherman-area churches.

The vandalism at Natalie’s Kitchen likely will qualify as a hate crime given the content of the messages, he said, but there were elements included that make it seem unlikely to be the work of an organized anti-semitic group.


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1

 Nov 01, 2009 at 06:38 PM Anonymous Says:

The good news is that fewer jewish organizations and schools are sponsoring Halloween related or theme events this year. Its amazing how many yiddeshe families, though, allow their kids to go trick or treating. Most of the candies they collect may be kosher but for many of us, Halloween still is a goiyeshe celebrtion and has little relationship with yiddishkeit.

2

 Nov 01, 2009 at 08:21 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #1  
Anonymous Says:

The good news is that fewer jewish organizations and schools are sponsoring Halloween related or theme events this year. Its amazing how many yiddeshe families, though, allow their kids to go trick or treating. Most of the candies they collect may be kosher but for many of us, Halloween still is a goiyeshe celebrtion and has little relationship with yiddishkeit.

You make me laugh,, I remember a few years ago, I lived out of town, and closed all my lights so that it should look like I was not home on Halloween night, cuz I did not want to have to deal with it. I was talking to my friend from Monroe, and she is chasidish, never heard of Halloween, so she had no idea what I was talking about, that goyim have an immitation purim,,,, She went about her daily life, and I felt so sad, that I had to deal with the whole shtus of the outside world

3

 Nov 01, 2009 at 07:56 PM Anonymous Says:

My Rav (Orthodox) holds that Halloween is no longer a goyishe holiday, but rather it is an American holiday (like Thanksgiving and 4th of July) and it is entirely Muttar to partake in the festivities

4

 Nov 01, 2009 at 07:49 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #1  
Anonymous Says:

The good news is that fewer jewish organizations and schools are sponsoring Halloween related or theme events this year. Its amazing how many yiddeshe families, though, allow their kids to go trick or treating. Most of the candies they collect may be kosher but for many of us, Halloween still is a goiyeshe celebrtion and has little relationship with yiddishkeit.

where are these Jewish schools and yiddishe families celebrating Halloween? I don't see them in flatbush or boro park. Thanks Giving, July 4, Mother's day is also "goyishe." People these days don't celebrate Halloween for any religious purpose, so it has become a very secular holiday, with just bit more creativity than Purim.

5

 Nov 01, 2009 at 07:30 PM Trustee Says:

i wont forget.....holloween ...the skootzim targeted the shul......g-t beheet you wore a yalmuka....then you got a free egg (and it wasnt hardboiled)...and what about .

6

 Nov 01, 2009 at 07:28 PM Who? Says:

Reply to #1  
Anonymous Says:

The good news is that fewer jewish organizations and schools are sponsoring Halloween related or theme events this year. Its amazing how many yiddeshe families, though, allow their kids to go trick or treating. Most of the candies they collect may be kosher but for many of us, Halloween still is a goiyeshe celebrtion and has little relationship with yiddishkeit.

I live in Brooklyn and nobody's kids go trick or treating. Its a clearly non jewish holiday with its non jewish customs and we have no interest to take part in it. Where do jewish kids trick or treat?

7

 Nov 01, 2009 at 09:34 PM Milhouse Says:

Reply to #2  
Anonymous Says:

You make me laugh,, I remember a few years ago, I lived out of town, and closed all my lights so that it should look like I was not home on Halloween night, cuz I did not want to have to deal with it. I was talking to my friend from Monroe, and she is chasidish, never heard of Halloween, so she had no idea what I was talking about, that goyim have an immitation purim,,,, She went about her daily life, and I felt so sad, that I had to deal with the whole shtus of the outside world

There's a big difference between Halloween and Purim: on Purim children learn to give, and on Halloween they learn to demand with menaces. ראו מה בין בני לבן חמי

8

 Nov 01, 2009 at 09:34 PM Pentakika Says:

Reply to #3  
Anonymous Says:

My Rav (Orthodox) holds that Halloween is no longer a goyishe holiday, but rather it is an American holiday (like Thanksgiving and 4th of July) and it is entirely Muttar to partake in the festivities

Maybe Holloween became Americanized, but its origins are still pagan. The holiday celebrates death, ghouls, witches, ghosts, zombies and other goyishe things. Also, it teaches children to take and receive "free" candies instead of give candies to each other. A person has to buy candy at his/her expense to feed selfish children and typically if such children don't receive candy they get upset and rowdy.

9

 Nov 01, 2009 at 09:33 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #6  
Who? Says:

I live in Brooklyn and nobody's kids go trick or treating. Its a clearly non jewish holiday with its non jewish customs and we have no interest to take part in it. Where do jewish kids trick or treat?

In virtually every city in the U.S. outside the few "yiddeshe ghettos" in WB,BP, Monsey, Pikesville (MD), there is a surprisingly high percentage of secular and MO jewish kids who go trick or treating or participate in events with a Halloween theme. As poster no. 4 notes, many Orthodox rabbonim hold that Halloween is no longer a goyishe holiday, but rather it is an American holiday (like Thanksgiving and 4th of July) and it is entirely muttar to partake in the festivities. I don't necessarily subscribe to that view, but apparently many do. Your problem is that you need to get out of Brooklyn more oftern where we have a much more flexible view of adopting goiyeshe minhagim. Perhaps they view these parties as a belated Simchat Beis Hashoeva

10

 Nov 01, 2009 at 10:56 PM You make me very sad. Says:

How can yidden have a "Flexible view " on adopting goyish min hagim. Then you wonder why theres assimilation and intermarriage?

11

 Nov 01, 2009 at 11:21 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #10  
You make me very sad. Says:

How can yidden have a "Flexible view " on adopting goyish min hagim. Then you wonder why theres assimilation and intermarriage?

I think you missed the sarcasm in the post....I don't believe poster no. 10 was happy either about the "flexible" view on halacha but was making the point that once you get outside of Borough Park its a very different world..

12

 Nov 01, 2009 at 10:29 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #9  
Anonymous Says:

In virtually every city in the U.S. outside the few "yiddeshe ghettos" in WB,BP, Monsey, Pikesville (MD), there is a surprisingly high percentage of secular and MO jewish kids who go trick or treating or participate in events with a Halloween theme. As poster no. 4 notes, many Orthodox rabbonim hold that Halloween is no longer a goyishe holiday, but rather it is an American holiday (like Thanksgiving and 4th of July) and it is entirely muttar to partake in the festivities. I don't necessarily subscribe to that view, but apparently many do. Your problem is that you need to get out of Brooklyn more oftern where we have a much more flexible view of adopting goiyeshe minhagim. Perhaps they view these parties as a belated Simchat Beis Hashoeva

Why should someone have a flexible view about adopting goyishe minhagim? What about chukas hagoy?

13

 Nov 02, 2009 at 12:18 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #8  
Pentakika Says:

Maybe Holloween became Americanized, but its origins are still pagan. The holiday celebrates death, ghouls, witches, ghosts, zombies and other goyishe things. Also, it teaches children to take and receive "free" candies instead of give candies to each other. A person has to buy candy at his/her expense to feed selfish children and typically if such children don't receive candy they get upset and rowdy.

In today's age, children no longer believe in seriousness of ghosts, zombies, gouls, witches unless they have crazy parents teaching them that those stuff exist. No one really "celebrates" witches, more like teens and adults trying to replay childhood once a year. There is no deep thought behind Halloween that children learn negative lessons from. What is the difference between buying some stash of candies once a year to give out to little kids or having to buy shalohmanos that will cost you more per bag anyway? Some teenagers may go wild and throw around eggs or create some fuss, but it's not as bad as people make it sound.
One can say that on Purim we teach our kids that underage drinking or DUI is acceptable because the same story happens every year on Purim. But I don't think that minor aspect overshadows the entire holiday of Purim.

14

 Nov 02, 2009 at 08:16 AM Allan Says:

Reply to #8  
Pentakika Says:

Maybe Holloween became Americanized, but its origins are still pagan. The holiday celebrates death, ghouls, witches, ghosts, zombies and other goyishe things. Also, it teaches children to take and receive "free" candies instead of give candies to each other. A person has to buy candy at his/her expense to feed selfish children and typically if such children don't receive candy they get upset and rowdy.

A wonderful post, and I agree. To celebrate death in any way is just plain obscene. Let me add that Thanksgiving is an American holiday as is July4th..both reflecting on the history of the United States. As for Mother's Day or Fathers Day..I find them both to be ok but also stupid..if you are fortunate enough to have either or both parents every day should be those days.

15

 Nov 02, 2009 at 09:22 AM Anonymous Says:

"there is a surprisingly high percentage of secular and MO jewish kids who go trick or treating or participate in events with a Halloween theme."

What on earth are you talking about. I've never known a single "MO jewish kid" who ever observed any aspects of the day.

16

 Nov 02, 2009 at 10:58 AM Aharon Says:

Reply to #15  
Anonymous Says:

"there is a surprisingly high percentage of secular and MO jewish kids who go trick or treating or participate in events with a Halloween theme."

What on earth are you talking about. I've never known a single "MO jewish kid" who ever observed any aspects of the day.

Just another example of uninformed MO bashing

17

 Nov 02, 2009 at 04:00 PM You missed the earlier post. Says:

Reply to #16  
Aharon Says:

Just another example of uninformed MO bashing

Someone posted that he knows that MO rav's pasken that its ok to go trick or treating and that many modern orthodox kids go. He didn't sound like he was bashing he was stating facts and sadly I believe it. Nebach.

18

 Nov 02, 2009 at 04:56 PM Anonymous Says:

Name 1 mo Rav who paskens this way?

19

 Nov 02, 2009 at 06:33 PM Shmeel Says:

My aunt who went to frum school in the 1960's used to dress up in a costume and go trickortreating to the neighbors... they didn't know any better in those days and now her sons are in Mir and Lakewood so go figure ?

20

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