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New Jersey - New Law Keep Snow Off Your Car or Face Fines

Published on: October 20, 2010 01:21 PM
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New Jersey - A law going into effect today imposes a fine for drivers who fail to clean snow or ice off their vehicles before driving.

Starting today, New Jersey drivers could face up to a $75 fine for failing to clean the ice and snow off their cars, state officials announced Wednesday.

In the past, said Division of Highway Traffic Safety Director Pam Fischer, drivers would only be fined if snow and ice fell off their vehicle and caused damage or injury. Now motorists will be expected to clean snow and ice off before hitting the road or face a fine of $25 to $75.

The fines for damage or injury range from $200 to $1,000, or $500 to $1,500 for commercial drivers.

“Snow and ice left on a vehicle, in particular on the hood, windows and roof, can become a deadly projectile, creating a hazard for everyone on the road,” Fischer said in a news release.  “The few moments it takes to clear ice and snow from your vehicle could prevent a crash or save a life.”

In anticipation of the winter weather, state officials encouraged motorists to:

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Tune up and winterize their vehicles, as well as check the radiator, battery, antifreeze, and all other fluid levels.

Check tire treads and replace them if they’re unsafe.

Check and replace windshield wiper blades if the rubber is cracked and/or brittle, and be sure to check and refill the washer fluid reservoir.

Maintain at least a half a tank of gas during the winter to prevent the fuel line from freezing.


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Read Comments (14)  —  Post Yours »

1

 Oct 20, 2010 at 01:49 PM Anonymous Says:

Long overdue. So for the Yidden and others who think it is cool not to clean the roofs of their SUV's and have the snow and ice flow to the cars behind them, you have been forewarned of hefty fines.

2

 Oct 20, 2010 at 01:51 PM CampRunamok Says:

It is incredible the number of cars I see after a snowstorm with a 4 x 8 inch square cut out of the snow covering the windshield. That is all the driver has available with which to see where he is going!

I am far from a nanny-statist but this is a public safety concern on stilts!

3

 Oct 20, 2010 at 02:06 PM sasregener Says:

I was on the New Jersey Turnpike 3 years ago driving behind a van and a large chunk of ice went flying off the roof of the van right into my windshield and shattered my windshield. Not something you want to happen to you at 60 miles an hour. My windshield literaly exploded. B'H nothing else happened but it was very scary. Good Law!

4

 Oct 20, 2010 at 02:06 PM mewhoze Says:

how much snow? a dusting? a foot? who determines?
does a person who is elderly and handicapped have to stand outside and try to clean off their car?

5

 Oct 20, 2010 at 02:10 PM My2Cents Says:

Nice one, I hope ny follows and enforces.

6

 Oct 20, 2010 at 02:54 PM Anonymous Says:

To #4-Mewhoze- Kindly let me educate you; the elderly and handicapped are subject to the same traffic laws, as the younger and non-disabled drivers. I've noticed a number of instances of drivers with the disability placards on their windshields speeding or cutting off other traffic. It distinctly states on the disability placard (in my state) to remove it while driving, but people don't pay attention. Incidentally, I've seen drivers of all ages who are too lazy or inept to remove snow and ice from their front and rear windshields, as well as from license plates. The law is very clear on the latter matter, as the license plate must be kept clean and clear of any obstructions, at all times. Also, when a driver's visibility is limited, because of snow and ice on the windows, it increases the danger not only to that driver and his/her passengers, but to other cars in the immediate area. With front and rear defrosters standard on most vehicles, there is no reason to drive with snow and ice on the windows.

8

 Oct 20, 2010 at 03:39 PM Worker Says:

I will have lots of fun standing on the roof of my school bus cleaning snow....

9

 Oct 20, 2010 at 03:54 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #4  
mewhoze Says:

how much snow? a dusting? a foot? who determines?
does a person who is elderly and handicapped have to stand outside and try to clean off their car?

I recognize your eName on numerous comments on different articles trying to instigate arguments on each.

Here is your answer:
1. who determines? the lawmakers. the code will be very specific and clear.

2. Elderly and handicapped? YES: able to drive? able to clean. If anybody needs to have as much visibility as possible, it would be elderly and handicapped drivers. If they can't do it, let them get someone to do it for them, or take a taxi or bus.

They have to shovel sidewalks, or hire someone else to, same thing here, except that this is even MORE of a safety issue than sidewalks.

And if you had any brains or the slightest amount of common sense, this would have been obvious to you.

10

 Oct 20, 2010 at 04:10 PM Joe-Shmoe Says:

Reply to #1  
Anonymous Says:

Long overdue. So for the Yidden and others who think it is cool not to clean the roofs of their SUV's and have the snow and ice flow to the cars behind them, you have been forewarned of hefty fines.

that's taking "bishvilli nivra haolam" to a whole new extent! laws are created only for and because the yiddin, only yiddin drive without getting up on their suv's with a ladder to clean the top of their suvs. "Those yiddin" aaaaaccccchhhh! Always crying, after they do "naive" things! waaaa. Goyim always clean their cars, so this would never happen to them (goyim as self hating jews!!!)

11

 Oct 20, 2010 at 04:19 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #9  
Anonymous Says:

I recognize your eName on numerous comments on different articles trying to instigate arguments on each.

Here is your answer:
1. who determines? the lawmakers. the code will be very specific and clear.

2. Elderly and handicapped? YES: able to drive? able to clean. If anybody needs to have as much visibility as possible, it would be elderly and handicapped drivers. If they can't do it, let them get someone to do it for them, or take a taxi or bus.

They have to shovel sidewalks, or hire someone else to, same thing here, except that this is even MORE of a safety issue than sidewalks.

And if you had any brains or the slightest amount of common sense, this would have been obvious to you.

How about my name! here you go!

Please read prior to attacking a fellow yid. He didn't say anything that outrageous for you to attack him!
Had you read, you would've seen the article about cleaning your car, which includes the roof. Soooo he has a good point. are we going to leave older people in their house (snow makes it very dangerous for them to step outside) except if you want to shop their bread every time it snows? Are you going to stand on a ladder to clean the roof of their car so that you can drive like a pooretz tailgating?

Please tell me exactly how far you have to be from another car when driving 60 mph, try it out with a big piece of snow on the roof and let it "FLY" off. when you keep your safe distance you are protecting your self, protecting the elderly peoples health. its called selfish.

12

 Oct 20, 2010 at 10:26 PM booky Says:

very good! finally they are making this law, its so dangerous to have snow on your roof if you make a short stop, the whole snow goes on the front window and chas veshulem what can happen... in Montreal its already in affect for years.

to no. 8
i don't know if you have to clean the whole roof of the bus

14

 Oct 21, 2010 at 09:13 AM mj00056 Says:

Are motorcycles exempt? This is a serious question, also what about horses and horse drawn conveyances?

15

 Oct 21, 2010 at 11:30 AM ALLAN Says:

I wonder how NJ will enforce this good law with regard to large trucks such as 18 wheelers? Driving behind an 18 wheeler at highway speeds after a now storm can be really dangerous. They will have to require those vehicle to go thru a truck wash if the law has teeth.

16

 Oct 23, 2010 at 08:38 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #15  
ALLAN Says:

I wonder how NJ will enforce this good law with regard to large trucks such as 18 wheelers? Driving behind an 18 wheeler at highway speeds after a now storm can be really dangerous. They will have to require those vehicle to go thru a truck wash if the law has teeth.

As usual, ALLAN, you have something to say even if you have nothing to say.

Why is it your problem what they do with 18-wheelers? Do you drive one? Do you expect advice from VIN readers? Not to mention that these are not usually left outdoors, esp. in a snowstorm. Extra snow means extra weight, and truck drivers are very sensitive to anything like extra weight that effects their gas mileage (i.e., expenses).

Call the NJ MVB and ask them if this is important to you. Why are you bothering us?

17

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