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Skokie, IL - Estate Sued for Plane Crash That Killed Grandkids

Published on: December 1, 2010 09:55 PM
By:  TribLocal
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FILE - A team from Chesed Shel Emes at the site of teh crash to assist FILE - A team from Chesed Shel Emes at the site of teh crash to assist

Skokie, IL - The mother of a boy who was seriously injured in a July plane crash that killed his grandfather, two sisters and a cousin has sued the estate of his grandfather, a Skokie businessman who was flying the plane.

Sharon “Sima” Menora filed the suit in Cook County Tuesday on behalf of her son, Nathaniel Joseph “Yossi” Menora, 13, who suffered severe burns to his arms and legs when the plane his grandfather Moshe Menora was flying crashed while trying to take off from a Michigan airport to return to the Chicago area.

In addition to the executors of Moshe Menora’s estate, the boy’s mother also sued Tri-United Management and Tri-United Development. Both are real estate companies that Menora owned in Skokie and both are listed in the lawsuit as the owners of the Beech 58 twin-engine plane.

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The suit asserts that Moshe Menora and the businesses were negligent in not properly maintaining the aircraft or ensure a safe takeoff. The suit seeks at least $50,000 in damages.

A separate wrongful death suit was also filed on behalf of Yossi Menora’s sisters Rachel Menora, 14, and Rebecca Menora, 16, who died in the crash, along with their 73-year-old grandfather and cousin Sara Klein, 17.

The cousins all lived in Israel and were visiting their grandfather, who’d taken them on the day trip to Mackinac Island.

A preliminary report by the National Transportation and Safety Board indicated that Moshe Menora twice failed to get the plane airborne before it crashed onto an interstate highway about 1,000 feet from the runway at Mackinac County Airport.

Kevin Durkin, an attorney at Clifford Law Offices in Chicago, which filed the civil suits, said cases of family members suing each other aren’t uncommon.

“It’s not unusual. This is how people get compensated for injuries,” Durkin said. “The only way for Sharon Menora to protect her and her children is to file this lawsuit. It is what any parent would do. Especially with the severe injuries and the loss they had. It’s a civil action for money damages.”

Sharon Menora is the former wife of Shalom Menora, who is the father of Yossi, Rebecca and Rachel Menora and the son of Moshe Menora.

A representative at Tri-United declined comment


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Read Comments (19)  —  Post Yours »

1

 Dec 01, 2010 at 10:21 PM Anonymous Says:

If the plane did not get airborne after two attempts, it should never have been taken for a third try. Perhaps, the plane was overloaded. Private planes are very unforgiving in a crash; unlike a large commerical airliner, the chances of surviving a smaller plane crash, are much lower.

2

 Dec 01, 2010 at 11:51 PM yankle Says:

Reply to #1  
Anonymous Says:

If the plane did not get airborne after two attempts, it should never have been taken for a third try. Perhaps, the plane was overloaded. Private planes are very unforgiving in a crash; unlike a large commerical airliner, the chances of surviving a smaller plane crash, are much lower.

that is simply not true

3

 Dec 02, 2010 at 01:29 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #2  
yankle Says:

that is simply not true

Yankle: True or not, it's the only way she will have any funds to take care of her injured son, and she is entitled to that.

5

 Dec 02, 2010 at 05:43 AM Anonymous Says:

To #2-Yankle- Look at the statistics released by the National Transportation Safety Board (they have a website), and you will see hundreds of fatal private plane crashes listed, since 1962. The vast majority of those crashes have been caused by pilot error (i.e. fuel starvation, proceeding to fly in bad weather, misjudging an approach for a landing, not being instrument rated, the plane being overweight, etc.). Smaller private planes, structurally speaking, have very few of the protections that larger commercial airliners have

6

 Dec 02, 2010 at 08:41 AM Anonymous Says:

If this woman doesn't commit suicide, she's a tsadekes.”

What made you think we have to read this unfiltered thought of your mind?

7

 Dec 02, 2010 at 08:41 AM Anonymous Says:

73-year-old grandfather

Elderly people should not be taking people up in small airplanes for joy rides. This was a major tragedy that should never have happened.

8

 Dec 02, 2010 at 08:54 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #7  
Anonymous Says:

73-year-old grandfather

Elderly people should not be taking people up in small airplanes for joy rides. This was a major tragedy that should never have happened.

Gee - this is a very bright comment. I know the Menora family. First, his age was not even remotely a factor in the accident. Second, he was very vibrant and was still working and all his cognitive abilities were intact. Third - why stop there, maybe "elderly" people should not drive anyone in a car or light Chanukah candles in a house with others around. If you respected elderly you would know not to categorize them all into a bucket of "accidents waiting to happen".

9

 Dec 02, 2010 at 09:26 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #8  
Anonymous Says:

Gee - this is a very bright comment. I know the Menora family. First, his age was not even remotely a factor in the accident. Second, he was very vibrant and was still working and all his cognitive abilities were intact. Third - why stop there, maybe "elderly" people should not drive anyone in a car or light Chanukah candles in a house with others around. If you respected elderly you would know not to categorize them all into a bucket of "accidents waiting to happen".

There is a mandatory retirement age for commercial airline pilots at age 65, why do you think the FAA has such a rule?

10

 Dec 02, 2010 at 09:45 AM Barzilai Says:

Reply to #7  
Anonymous Says:

73-year-old grandfather

Elderly people should not be taking people up in small airplanes for joy rides. This was a major tragedy that should never have happened.

This man, as tough as nails and as and sharp as most twenty year olds, flew as often as most people drive cars, and was compulsively thorough in matters of safety. If he did it, it was his expert opinion that it was one hundred percent safe. What hubris and azus it is to blithely render a verdict, when the government is still investigating.

I just don't understand why this poor woman would throw away half or a third of what she gets from the family, which is what Clifford's firm generally takes. What was the rush? Was it so necessary to run to the arkaos? Had she exhausted all possibilities before resorting to what is in essence gneivah? Did she not realize that she could have gotten insurance (and probably more) without making this
poor family suffer? Nebach on all of these people.

11

 Dec 02, 2010 at 10:07 AM sane Says:

What a ridiculous comment! Grow up!

12

 Dec 02, 2010 at 10:33 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #9  
Anonymous Says:

There is a mandatory retirement age for commercial airline pilots at age 65, why do you think the FAA has such a rule?

There is a lot of controversy over the mandatory retirement age (which used to be 60). The best pilots are often forced to retire exactly when they are at their best. They are replaced by younger pilots who simply do not have the same experience as they do.

13

 Dec 02, 2010 at 11:08 AM Anonymous Says:

Some of the best, most experienced pilots in the world, have made pilot errors, which have been costly. There is an old saying, once, twice, three strikes you're out; common sense dictates that if an aircraft does not develop enough thrust to become airborne after two tries, you don't risk the lives of young children on a third try. Something was definitely mechanically wrong with that aircraft; in the months ahead, the NTSB will be dissecting the entire aircraft, and will analyze every component. When the NTSB's final report is issued, it will undoubtedly find mechanical problems as well as pilot error, contributed to that tragic, fatal accident.

14

 Dec 02, 2010 at 11:32 AM Anonymous Says:

the accident happened in the 9 days. we are supposed to be more careful then. that makes it so sad, why were they flying in a small plane that week??

15

 Dec 02, 2010 at 04:00 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #9  
Anonymous Says:

There is a mandatory retirement age for commercial airline pilots at age 65, why do you think the FAA has such a rule?

A) pilots have been fighting that rule for a long time B) I would hardly compare the Governments edicts with what is appropriate for someone who owns his own private plane and flies family - he was not "commercially" responsible for 150 + passengers. In general when people retire at age 65 the Government does not revoke their drivers licenses. One has nothing to do with the other.

16

 Dec 02, 2010 at 04:03 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #10  
Barzilai Says:

This man, as tough as nails and as and sharp as most twenty year olds, flew as often as most people drive cars, and was compulsively thorough in matters of safety. If he did it, it was his expert opinion that it was one hundred percent safe. What hubris and azus it is to blithely render a verdict, when the government is still investigating.

I just don't understand why this poor woman would throw away half or a third of what she gets from the family, which is what Clifford's firm generally takes. What was the rush? Was it so necessary to run to the arkaos? Had she exhausted all possibilities before resorting to what is in essence gneivah? Did she not realize that she could have gotten insurance (and probably more) without making this
poor family suffer? Nebach on all of these people.

Please don't judge or even question a woman who lost two children in a plane crash and sat bedside in an unfamiliar city, far away from home in Israel to watch her son go through painful burn victim treatments. We can not know her pain or her emotional and psychological state nor do we know all circumstances surrounding money between her and the family.

17

 Dec 02, 2010 at 04:08 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #13  
Anonymous Says:

Some of the best, most experienced pilots in the world, have made pilot errors, which have been costly. There is an old saying, once, twice, three strikes you're out; common sense dictates that if an aircraft does not develop enough thrust to become airborne after two tries, you don't risk the lives of young children on a third try. Something was definitely mechanically wrong with that aircraft; in the months ahead, the NTSB will be dissecting the entire aircraft, and will analyze every component. When the NTSB's final report is issued, it will undoubtedly find mechanical problems as well as pilot error, contributed to that tragic, fatal accident.

apparently you are not waiting for the formal report - u just decided yourself what the findings are....

19

 Dec 03, 2010 at 04:58 AM Anonymous Says:

It could be that the only way the insurance company will pay out properly is if they are sued. The pilot was clearly at fault if he needed three chances to get the plane into the air and did not stop after the first two.

20

 Dec 21, 2010 at 03:03 PM ANNON Says:

Reply to #19  
Anonymous Says:

It could be that the only way the insurance company will pay out properly is if they are sued. The pilot was clearly at fault if he needed three chances to get the plane into the air and did not stop after the first two.

Clearly you know nothing about flying a plane. It is not uncommon on a small runway for there to be multiple attempts at a takeoff. Also don't you have any common sense. Perhaps the family reads this don't you think they have enough pain they don't need you to start placing blame.

21

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