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New York - MTA Hike Drives Off 1 Million Motorists

Published on: June 28, 2011 09:58 PM
By: Read more at NY Post
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New York - Motorists are steering clear of MTA bridges and tunnels following a series of massive toll hikes.

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Traffic on the agency’s nine crossings plummeted by about 1 million vehicles in April 2011 when compared to April 2010.

Passenger-car crossings were down by 3.9 percent, while other vehicles, such as trucks and buses, declined by 6.6 percent.

And MTA officials admitted that the downturn mainly stemmed from the recent unpopular fare hikes, although poor weather and high gas prices also contributed.

In December, the fee at most major crossings increased by $1 each way.

Cash tolls widely increased by 18 percent, with the Henry Hudson Bridge toll jumping 33 percent.

As a result, many fuming drivers found alternate routes.

The mass exodus has left the MTA in a financial bind.


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1

 Jun 28, 2011 at 10:04 PM Anonymous Says:

This explains why we need MORE bike lanes so that drivers can leave their cars home and bike into the city. All we hear is about how difficult the bike lanes have made it for yidden in the heimehse neighborhoods of Brooklyn. This articles shows that without those bikelanes, it would have been more difficult to get to the bridges and tunnels.

2

 Jun 28, 2011 at 10:28 PM Chaveirim Says:

When will they learn that hiking tolls (and taxes) doesn't really work, as we see here and everywhere else...

3

 Jun 28, 2011 at 10:30 PM Real Chochom Says:

When will all agencies learn that's its NOT wise to raise prices, as out of necessity people learn to do things the cheaper way. Like when the postal service didn't stop raising the 1st class stamp more & more people got to learn how to pay their bill's online & the list goes on.

4

 Jun 28, 2011 at 10:34 PM KevinTheMevin Says:

Everyone thinks they can keep hiking prices and everyone will keep paying up because they need the service, fact is most households in the USA are hurting and at some point these constant price hikes have to come to an end.

5

 Jun 28, 2011 at 11:01 PM Anonymous Says:

"The mass exodus has left the MTA in a financial bind."

Why don't they just raise the tolls to make up the deficit?

6

 Jun 28, 2011 at 11:15 PM avi e Says:

Everyone complains about the traffic, but when the MTA effectively reduces traffic by 1 million vehicles by raising tolls, everybody complains. You can't have it both ways. Either you make the city convenient for cars, and deal with the congestion that brings, or you make the city expensive for cars, and therefore reduce the congestion.

7

 Jun 28, 2011 at 11:38 PM yalili Says:

Maybe there should be some kind of boycott against the mta so they will have to lower the tolls

8

 Jun 28, 2011 at 11:39 PM charliehall Says:

Reply to #2  
Chaveirim Says:

When will they learn that hiking tolls (and taxes) doesn't really work, as we see here and everywhere else...

Huh? Tolls increase by 18-33 percent and usage drops by 3.9-6.6 percent. That is an increase in revenue!

9

 Jun 28, 2011 at 11:52 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #1  
Anonymous Says:

This explains why we need MORE bike lanes so that drivers can leave their cars home and bike into the city. All we hear is about how difficult the bike lanes have made it for yidden in the heimehse neighborhoods of Brooklyn. This articles shows that without those bikelanes, it would have been more difficult to get to the bridges and tunnels.

this explains nothing about bikes, and business people who have real jobs have no interest in cycling to the city.

For children like you, it's fine.

10

 Jun 29, 2011 at 12:05 AM curious Says:

Reply to #1  
Anonymous Says:

This explains why we need MORE bike lanes so that drivers can leave their cars home and bike into the city. All we hear is about how difficult the bike lanes have made it for yidden in the heimehse neighborhoods of Brooklyn. This articles shows that without those bikelanes, it would have been more difficult to get to the bridges and tunnels.

Did we read the same Article???????

11

 Jun 29, 2011 at 12:35 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #8  
charliehall Says:

Huh? Tolls increase by 18-33 percent and usage drops by 3.9-6.6 percent. That is an increase in revenue!

Apparently you don't know how to do math

12

 Jun 29, 2011 at 02:52 AM Aron1 Says:

Reply to #11  
Anonymous Says:

Apparently you don't know how to do math

No, you are the one deficient in math skills.
Hypothetical scenario:
Pre-hike:
10 million vehicles pay an average of $10. Total = $100 million
Post-hike:
9,340,000 vehicles (6.6% drop) pay an average of $11.80 (18% toll increase). Total equals 110,212,000. That's about a 10% increase in revenue (and that's with assuming the larger 6.6% vehicle drop off and the smaller 18% toll increase; the actual drop off is reportedly less than 6.6% and the actual toll increase is greater than 18%, resulting in an even greater than 10% increase in revenue).
That being said, I am totally against the toll increase, as it is a form of regressive taxation.

13

 Jun 29, 2011 at 08:15 AM realistic Says:

T be honest, I really don't mind paying ore tolls if it ould result in less traffic.
Driving thru the city is a nightmare and having less cars on the road is what we need. Peoiple need to realize that living or doing business is a luxury and if u can't afford the tolls, you beloing somewhere else.
In fact, I suppirted the idea of mayor bloomberg to charge tolls on the east river bridges and on any car entering manhattan. My time is worth much more than the hike in tolls.
(Writing this while sitting in traffic....)

14

 Jun 29, 2011 at 09:12 AM realistic Says:

T be honest, I really don't mind paying ore tolls if it ould result in less traffic.
Driving thru the city is a nightmare and having less cars on the road is what we need. Peoiple need to realize that living or doing business is a luxury and if u can't afford the tolls, you beloing somewhere else.
In fact, I suppirted the idea of mayor bloomberg to charge tolls on the east river bridges and on any car entering manhattan. My time is worth much more than the hike in tolls.
(Writing this while sitting in traffic....)

15

 Jun 29, 2011 at 09:19 AM reb yona Says:

Reply to #8  
charliehall Says:

Huh? Tolls increase by 18-33 percent and usage drops by 3.9-6.6 percent. That is an increase in revenue!

Not necesarily, here's why
If the toll hike is a dollar per vehicle for let's say, 1 million cars and you now have 100,000 less vehicles paying an average of $10, you break even. Remember that a vehicle usually pays toll more than once for each trip.

16

 Jun 29, 2011 at 09:42 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #12  
Aron1 Says:

No, you are the one deficient in math skills.
Hypothetical scenario:
Pre-hike:
10 million vehicles pay an average of $10. Total = $100 million
Post-hike:
9,340,000 vehicles (6.6% drop) pay an average of $11.80 (18% toll increase). Total equals 110,212,000. That's about a 10% increase in revenue (and that's with assuming the larger 6.6% vehicle drop off and the smaller 18% toll increase; the actual drop off is reportedly less than 6.6% and the actual toll increase is greater than 18%, resulting in an even greater than 10% increase in revenue).
That being said, I am totally against the toll increase, as it is a form of regressive taxation.

Actually make it simple if the toll cost $10 to go through and they raise it $1 but drop 1 million customers they lost $10 million instead of gaining $1 million

17

 Jun 29, 2011 at 10:16 AM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #12  
Aron1 Says:

No, you are the one deficient in math skills.
Hypothetical scenario:
Pre-hike:
10 million vehicles pay an average of $10. Total = $100 million
Post-hike:
9,340,000 vehicles (6.6% drop) pay an average of $11.80 (18% toll increase). Total equals 110,212,000. That's about a 10% increase in revenue (and that's with assuming the larger 6.6% vehicle drop off and the smaller 18% toll increase; the actual drop off is reportedly less than 6.6% and the actual toll increase is greater than 18%, resulting in an even greater than 10% increase in revenue).
That being said, I am totally against the toll increase, as it is a form of regressive taxation.

Agreed, but if the MTA was expecting no (or little) drop-off in car volume (not unheard of in govt. rosy assumptions), they would probably forecast close to $118,000,000 and therefore be about $8,000,000 short of plan. They will try to make up that shortfall by hiking rates again and getting into the same problem. This is similar to raising taxes in that it breeds the need for more hikes in the future.

18

 Jun 29, 2011 at 10:22 AM Mentsh Says:

I actually go on the Queensborough Bridge a lot more frequently now that the tolls increased on the Whitestone and Throgs Neck. Now it costs $0 to get to New Jersey instead of going through the Bronx at $6.50. When you do this weekly, it adds up!

19

 Jun 29, 2011 at 11:14 AM chayamom Says:

Reply to #1  
Anonymous Says:

This explains why we need MORE bike lanes so that drivers can leave their cars home and bike into the city. All we hear is about how difficult the bike lanes have made it for yidden in the heimehse neighborhoods of Brooklyn. This articles shows that without those bikelanes, it would have been more difficult to get to the bridges and tunnels.

Bike lanes may make sense for single people with no packages. It makes no sense for families or those with packages.

20

 Jun 29, 2011 at 12:24 PM lollypop Says:

You know that all tolls were originally places temporarily and then the Mta decided its a good way to make money so they kept it. The govt should be paying for bridges and tunnels and if they don't have the money they can take it from all those govt workers that get pensions. Which normal business today gives pension?

21

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