Welcome, Guest! - or
Easy to remember!  »  VinNews.com

Bnei Brak - Tens Of Thousands Turn Out For Haredi Political Rally In Bnei Brak

Published on: March 11, 2015 01:44 PM
By: Jerusalem Post
Change text size Text Size  
Thousands of Ultra Orthodox Jews attend a rally organized for Yahadut HaTorah (United Torah Judaism) political party, in Bnei Brak, on March 11, 2015, ahead of the upcoming Knesset elections taking place on March 17. Photo by Flash90Thousands of Ultra Orthodox Jews attend a rally organized for Yahadut HaTorah (United Torah Judaism) political party, in Bnei Brak, on March 11, 2015, ahead of the upcoming Knesset elections taking place on March 17. Photo by Flash90

Bnei Brak - Tens of thousands of haredi men and women gathered in Bnei Brak to listen to the words of their rabbis and political representatives urging them to vote for the United Torah Judaism party on Election Day next week.

MKs from the party and the leading rabbis of the community spoke in terms of religious obligation of the importance of voting and the danger of failing to turn up at the voting booth this coming Tuesday.

As the leading rabbis ascended to the stage, including the head of the non-hassidic haredi world Rabbi Aharon Leib Shteinman, thousands upon thousands of men clapped their hands jumping up and down in celebration of the Torah sages in front of them.

Advertisement:

When it came to R’ Shteinman’s turn to address the audience he spoke for all of 50 seconds, in his quiet and somewhat slurred Hebrew.

The 102-year old rabbi called on the haredi community to go out and vote saying barely audibly even over the sounds system “it is in your hands to determine if there will be a sanctification of God’s name or a desecration of His name.”

The excitement of the audience was notably dampened by the brief and uninspiring words, with the organizers continuing swiftly to the speeches of the more vigorous rabbinical leaders of the community.

Haredi political leaders have railed against what they describe as the “wicked decrees” of the outgoing government, which sought among other measures to draft haredi men into military service, reform the conversion process and cut various state-paid budgets enjoyed by the haredi sector.

In light of this legislation, the haredi leaders speaking Wednesday night insisted that more than ever it was incumbent upon haredi men and women to go out and vote to “defend the Torah world.”

Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)
Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish youths take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)Ultra-Orthodox Jewish youths take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)
Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)
An ultra-Orthodox Jewish youth watches as a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party takes place in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)An ultra-Orthodox Jewish youth watches as a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party takes place in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish youths take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)Ultra-Orthodox Jewish youths take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)
An ultra-Orthodox Jewish boy waves a banner during a rally in support of the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)An ultra-Orthodox Jewish boy waves a banner during a rally in support of the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)
Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)
Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)
Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)
Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)
Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)Ultra-Orthodox Jews take part in a rally supporting the United Torah Judaism party in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv March 11, 2015. Israelis will vote in a parliamentary election on March 17, choosing among party lists of candidates to serve in the 120-seat Knesset.  (Credit: REUTERS)


More of today's headlines

Maine - A Maine senator says he has no intention of resigning over a series of offensive Facebook posts, including one that suggests President Barack Obama's family... Berlin - German Chancellor Angela Merkel has declined an invitation from Russian President Vladimir Putin to attend a military parade in Moscow marking the 70th...

 

Total26

Read Comments (26)  —  Post Yours »

1

 Mar 11, 2015 at 02:03 PM SG11224 Says:

Go GIMMEL.

Take that AHRON. ZL you too

2

 Mar 11, 2015 at 02:07 PM bubii Says:

Oy vey siz take gevaldig such achdus .

3

 Mar 11, 2015 at 02:08 PM FarRockDude Says:

I'm sorry...why was this NOT Bitul Torah???

4

 Mar 11, 2015 at 02:14 PM Reuven Says:

Everybody would much rather dance on the streets, than going to Gaza to do battle. It's much safer at home.

5

 Mar 11, 2015 at 02:51 PM mytaxguy Says:

Reply to #4  
Reuven Says:

Everybody would much rather dance on the streets, than going to Gaza to do battle. It's much safer at home.

D
oes everyone get to vote or only TAXPAYERS?

6

 Mar 11, 2015 at 03:14 PM Anonymous Says:

Working people would not have time for these things.

7

 Mar 11, 2015 at 03:35 PM lavrenty Says:

i thought they should be learning and keeping the world going, i guess another day off. in addition to whole nissan and tishrei and other things like shushan purim and every tanis.

8

 Mar 11, 2015 at 03:38 PM Glassman Says:

Reply to #3  
FarRockDude Says:

I'm sorry...why was this NOT Bitul Torah???

Es laasos LaHashem, heferu Torasecha

9

 Mar 11, 2015 at 03:57 PM RebKlemson Says:

so much welfare in one place

10

 Mar 11, 2015 at 03:57 PM aroini Says:

Reply to #3  
FarRockDude Says:

I'm sorry...why was this NOT Bitul Torah???

It is also B'yaharoig V'al yavoir

11

 Mar 11, 2015 at 04:05 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #5  
mytaxguy Says:

D
oes everyone get to vote or only TAXPAYERS?

Everyone in Israel IS a taxpayer! Every bill besides water and all food besides fruits, vegetables, bread and milk have 17.5% added tax.

12

 Mar 11, 2015 at 04:09 PM c Says:

They will be the end of the State.

13

 Mar 11, 2015 at 04:09 PM Anonymous Says:

Oh my! With all kuvid to Rav Steinman, but this is a treifana medinah and ultra orthodox yidden shld play no role in it. Sad to admit it wont happen till mashiachs day& may it be now.

14

 Mar 11, 2015 at 04:14 PM Antizionist Says:

Just leave the Torah out of it! Vote if you want but a kidush hashem it will never be no matter who wins.

15

 Mar 11, 2015 at 04:14 PM Rafuel Says:

Reply to #3  
FarRockDude Says:

I'm sorry...why was this NOT Bitul Torah???

How is it bitul Torah to defend Torah yiddishkheit? The misyavnim of our time are no less harmful than the misyavnim of the Bais Sheini. Or did the Maccabees engage in bitul Torah too, in your opinion?

16

 Mar 11, 2015 at 04:41 PM ShatzMatz Says:

Bitool Tayreh!!

17

 Mar 11, 2015 at 04:57 PM ayinglefunadorf Says:

Reply to #15  
Rafuel Says:

How is it bitul Torah to defend Torah yiddishkheit? The misyavnim of our time are no less harmful than the misyavnim of the Bais Sheini. Or did the Maccabees engage in bitul Torah too, in your opinion?

"how is it Bitul Torah" The Misjavnim of our time..." How is it not Bitul Torah? So if you stay home and learn Torah The Misjavnim will win? And if you are on the Streets they will lose? Whats the Psat?

18

 Mar 11, 2015 at 05:00 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #15  
Rafuel Says:

How is it bitul Torah to defend Torah yiddishkheit? The misyavnim of our time are no less harmful than the misyavnim of the Bais Sheini. Or did the Maccabees engage in bitul Torah too, in your opinion?

"How is it Bitul Torah to defend Yidischkeit?" So if the Arabs attack you will defend Yidischkeit with learning in the Beth Hamedresh? From yhe Misyanim you defend Yiddisckeit on the Streets? Makes a lot of sense.

19

 Mar 11, 2015 at 05:13 PM mytaxguy Says:

Reply to #11  
Anonymous Says:

Everyone in Israel IS a taxpayer! Every bill besides water and all food besides fruits, vegetables, bread and milk have 17.5% added tax.

So tourists should be able to vote too?

20

 Mar 11, 2015 at 05:36 PM TexasJew Says:

Thought I saw AlterG there.

21

 Mar 11, 2015 at 06:15 PM Anonymous Says:

Reply to #20  
TexasJew Says:

Thought I saw AlterG there.

Lol! Actually I'm worried for his health ater seeing how many showed up at this rally!!

22

 Mar 11, 2015 at 07:52 PM fat36 Says:

When it comes to anything with money the rabbis tell them to go out in the streets and chant where were they buy gush Katif?

23

 Mar 11, 2015 at 07:55 PM fat36 Says:

Reply to #18  
Anonymous Says:

"How is it Bitul Torah to defend Yidischkeit?" So if the Arabs attack you will defend Yidischkeit with learning in the Beth Hamedresh? From yhe Misyanim you defend Yiddisckeit on the Streets? Makes a lot of sense.

Then going to the Army to secure the gates to your shul so that you could continue learning without interruptions shouldn't be so bad

24

 Mar 11, 2015 at 08:32 PM Rafuel Says:

Reply to #18  
Anonymous Says:

"How is it Bitul Torah to defend Yidischkeit?" So if the Arabs attack you will defend Yidischkeit with learning in the Beth Hamedresh? From yhe Misyanim you defend Yiddisckeit on the Streets? Makes a lot of sense.

Yes, it does make perfect sense. Chofetz Chaim, when asked what the response to Communist persecutions should be, advised armed resistance. He brought up stories of Purim and Chanukah. When the enemy wants our physical annihilation (Amalek, Haman, Germans, yimach shemam v'zichram), the response is Torah and tshuva. When the enemy doesn't seek our annihilation but wants to force us to forget Torah (Yavanim, misyavnim, communists), the response, according to Chofetz Chaim, is violent resistance. In the last century, we got an opportunity to do both and we blew it both times. Hopefully we won't make this mistake again.

The current day misyavnim, zionists, secular Jews, don't seek our physical destruction, at least not openly, but they sure want to compel us to forget Torah and they act that way with less and less shame. They want to force our young learning men to serve their regime in the military where the holy men are forced to fraternize with immoral women. And that's just one of the many examples of persecution. I am not advocating armed resistance (yet), but the action that took place in Bnei Brak yesterday is more than appropriate.

25

 Mar 12, 2015 at 08:30 AM Greener Says:

Reply to #11  
Anonymous Says:

Everyone in Israel IS a taxpayer! Every bill besides water and all food besides fruits, vegetables, bread and milk have 17.5% added tax.

This joke is getting tiresome. Charedim constantly holler, "Oy veh, we are paying the 17.5% VAT; and we pay a lot cause he have a lot of kids!". (But that 17.5% comes from various government grants and subsidies.) Thus we only get 82.5% of what the evil zionist government is suposed to give us. We're being cheated!"
I'm tired of hearing this.
P.S. The VAT is also on the water bill, check with Mai Barak.

26

 Mar 12, 2015 at 08:35 AM An-anon-mous Says:

Reply to #19  
mytaxguy Says:

So tourists should be able to vote too?

"Tourists" do indeed vote in B'nai B'rak. Also dead people. It's a charedi tradition here in Israel. It's a big mitzvah to vote multiple times.

27

Sign-in to post a comment

Click here to sign-in.

Scroll Up
Advertisements:
Sell your scrap gold and broken jewelry and earn hard cash sell gold today!