Welcome, Guest! - or
Easy to remember!  »  VinNews.com

Tel Aviv - Police Caught French Citizen with 228 Etrogim in Smuggling Bust

Published on: October 3, 2011 02:46 PM
By: Read more at Arutz Sheva
Change text size Text Size  

Tel Aviv - Police at Ben Gurion Airport on Sunday arrested a French citizen who was trying to smuggle 228 etrogim (citrons) into the country. Arriving on a flight from Paris he tried to bring the two suitcases full of etrogim without declaring them.

The etrogim were to be sold as “top quality” etrogim for use on Sukkot.

Customs officials announced last week that they would be cracking down this year on importation of etrogim and the other items used on Sukkot. Lulavim, haddasim and aravot, used together with the etrog, cannot be imported by individuals at all, while travelers are permitted to bring one etrog into the country – as long as it is inspected by customs agents.

Advertisement:

The fruit was confiscated and turned over to the Agriculture Ministry.

“The damage caused… is manifested in a number of ways for which the entire population will pay a high price, including direct damage to humans and animals… harm to agricultural production, closure of the export market and damage to the environment and to quality of life,” said a statement.

Failure to follow the rules could also result in a large fine, ministry officials warned.



More of today's headlines

New York - In response to the recent reported events of Israeli extremists vandalizing an Islamic mosque in the Galilee village of Tuba-Zangariyye, the following... Waxahachie, TX - A fire at a chemical plant south of Dallas shot massive plumes of black smoke and bright orange flames into the sky Monday, forcing schoolchildren and...

 

Total10

Read Comments (10)  —  Post Yours »

1

 Oct 03, 2011 at 02:54 PM Anonymous Says:

Over the past several years, the customs police at BG airport have intercepted literally thousands of illegal esrogim being smuggled in for resale in the premium market where they would have sold for hundreds of dollars each, In all cases the esrogim were destroyed and the individuals involved received heavy fines and in several cases, jail time. A plain $20 esrog is more than sufficient for arba minim and this year it will be the lulavim that will be in short supply. Those who try to smuggle in these esrogim are doing so in the name of greed not hidur mitzvah.

2

 Oct 03, 2011 at 06:03 PM Rangers goalie Says:

"while travelers are permitted to bring one esrog into the country – as long as it is inspected by customs agents."
“The damage caused… is manifested in a number of ways for which the entire population will pay a high price, including direct damage to humans and animals… harm to agricultural production, closure of the export market and damage to the environment and to quality of life,” what, wait a minute.

So if 200 esrogim can cause such great harm, what difference does it make if say about 500-1000 passengers arrive with 500-1000 esrogim on a few inbound planes? That's still a lot of "outside of the country esrogim! Is that a big difference?

3

 Oct 03, 2011 at 06:21 PM heeb Says:

Its lilke importing snow to alaska......

4

 Oct 03, 2011 at 08:41 PM sechelhayoshor Says:

Reply to #1  
Anonymous Says:

Over the past several years, the customs police at BG airport have intercepted literally thousands of illegal esrogim being smuggled in for resale in the premium market where they would have sold for hundreds of dollars each, In all cases the esrogim were destroyed and the individuals involved received heavy fines and in several cases, jail time. A plain $20 esrog is more than sufficient for arba minim and this year it will be the lulavim that will be in short supply. Those who try to smuggle in these esrogim are doing so in the name of greed not hidur mitzvah.

They should bring them into the states. Here you can get 500 for a clean esrog. In israel, the most would be 300.00(1000 shekel).

5

 Oct 03, 2011 at 09:02 PM heeb Says:

Reply to #2  
Rangers goalie Says:

"while travelers are permitted to bring one esrog into the country – as long as it is inspected by customs agents."
“The damage caused… is manifested in a number of ways for which the entire population will pay a high price, including direct damage to humans and animals… harm to agricultural production, closure of the export market and damage to the environment and to quality of life,” what, wait a minute.

So if 200 esrogim can cause such great harm, what difference does it make if say about 500-1000 passengers arrive with 500-1000 esrogim on a few inbound planes? That's still a lot of "outside of the country esrogim! Is that a big difference?

Excellent!!!!! Deep down, you must really be an Islanders wanna be........

6

 Oct 03, 2011 at 09:33 PM chaim Says:

Mitzva haba b'avera

7

 Oct 04, 2011 at 07:17 AM Tzi_Bar_David Says:

Presumably sales tax would not be paid on the re-sale.

8

 Oct 04, 2011 at 08:49 AM bored Says:

Reply to #2  
Rangers goalie Says:

"while travelers are permitted to bring one esrog into the country – as long as it is inspected by customs agents."
“The damage caused… is manifested in a number of ways for which the entire population will pay a high price, including direct damage to humans and animals… harm to agricultural production, closure of the export market and damage to the environment and to quality of life,” what, wait a minute.

So if 200 esrogim can cause such great harm, what difference does it make if say about 500-1000 passengers arrive with 500-1000 esrogim on a few inbound planes? That's still a lot of "outside of the country esrogim! Is that a big difference?

Chacham , as a matter of courtesy to their customers they inspect a single import to make sure there are no harmful invasive species living on it. In order to inspect 200 or 500 or 1000 items it would require paying an employee for the service.A service which is in fact provided when you declare the import, which is what we all know as import tax.
Makes sense or does it need to be knocked in with a puck?

9

 Oct 04, 2011 at 12:21 PM Rangers goalie Says:

Reply to #8  
bored Says:

Chacham , as a matter of courtesy to their customers they inspect a single import to make sure there are no harmful invasive species living on it. In order to inspect 200 or 500 or 1000 items it would require paying an employee for the service.A service which is in fact provided when you declare the import, which is what we all know as import tax.
Makes sense or does it need to be knocked in with a puck?

The term is "does it need to be knocked in with a stick". But anyway my point is they do NOT check every esrog if individuals bring them in. Most people keep esrogim in their luggage and buy lulovim in Israel. So who and how are they being checked? Oh and BTW why did you put " and " before your ENTIRE post?

10

 Oct 04, 2011 at 06:24 PM bored Says:

Reply to #9  
Rangers goalie Says:

The term is "does it need to be knocked in with a stick". But anyway my point is they do NOT check every esrog if individuals bring them in. Most people keep esrogim in their luggage and buy lulovim in Israel. So who and how are they being checked? Oh and BTW why did you put " and " before your ENTIRE post?

I wasn't aware there was an official term! I thought i was being funny and creative. Oh well kvar kidmu li :) As far as the " and the ", I don't know what you are referring to.
A gut yur Reb Yid.

11

Sign-in to post a comment

Click here to sign-in.

Scroll Up
Advertisements:
Sell your scrap gold and broken jewelry and earn hard cash sell gold today!